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Lemmon Funeral Home of Dulaney Valley Inc.

10 West Padonia Road, Timonium, MD

AVIS DE DÉCÈS

Dr. Yung Keun Lee

26 septembre , 192929 septembre , 2019
Visionner la présentation hommage

Yung-keun Lee, professor emeritus in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University, died Sunday, September 29, at his home in Towson. He was 90.

Professor Lee, one of four children, was born in Seoul, Korea in 1929, to Hŏ Yŏng-suk, a doctor of gynecology and obstetrics, and Yi Kwang-su, one of the first modern writers in Korea, whose works have been translated into English (“The Soil,” Dalkey Press, 2017; and “Mujŏng: The Heartless,” Cornell East Asia Series, 2005). Professor Lee graduated from Susong Elementary School, and Chungang Middle School and High School in Seoul, Korea. He attended Seoul National University when the campus was evacuated to Pusan during the Korean War. Professor Lee then emigrated to the United States when he received a scholarship to study at Johns Hopkins University. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Johns Hopkins University in 1957, received an M.A. in Physics from the University of Chicago in 1958, and received a Ph.D. in Physics from Columbia University, in 1962. The Baltimore Sun published a photograph of Professor Lee shaking hands with the President of Johns Hopkins University, Milton Eisenhower, when he graduated.

In 1963, Yung Lee, Luke Mo, and Prof. C.S. Wu, using a Columbia University atom smasher, performed precise measurements of the boron-12 and nitrogen-12 beta-ray spectra. The measured data matched the theoretical prediction within 3%, and verified the Conserved Vector Current (CVC) model of the weak nuclear interaction. The weak interaction is responsible for the decay of all but the heaviest radioactive isotopes, and the CVC was an important step on the path to the present-day Standard Model of particle physics. (Source: Gus Caffrey, Ph.D., student of Professor Lee). At Johns Hopkins University, Professor Lee’s area of specialty was experimental nuclear physics.

He met his wife Ock-kyung when his sister Chung-nan introduced them at his college graduation. Chung-nan and Ock-kyung were both students at Bryn Mawr College. Professor Lee and Ock-kyung were married in 1958 in New York City when Professor Lee was attending Columbia. He and Mrs. Lee moved to Baltimore in 1964 when he became a professor of physics at Johns Hopkins in 1964.

He was a founding member of a Korean congregation that met for worship at Lovely Lane Methodist Church in Baltimore. Professor Lee was also chairman of the board of directors for the Baltimore Korean Language School on Taylor Avenue. Professor Lee helped Johns Hopkins students organize to obtain Korean language instruction at the university.

"He was a very loving and supportive husband and father,” said his wife Ock-kyung Lee, professor emerita in the Art Department at Towson University, in an interview. “He was so supportive of me that he would come to all of the openings of the art exhibits that I curated. Sometimes after I gave a talk, people would ask him questions, and he could answer.”

Professor Lee enjoyed playing golf, attending concerts of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and working on home projects such as designing and building bookshelves.

Professor Lee retired in 2004, and traveled with his wife, and visited his children and grandchildren. He is survived by his wife Ock-kyung Pai Lee, and his daughter Ann Lee, son Arnold Lee, daughter-in-law Grace Liao, daughter Sara Lee, son-in-law Michael Lawrence, daughter Sylvia Lee, son-in-law Wayne Kazan, daughter Clara Lee, son-in-law Bill Miller, granddaughters Leah Weaver, Zoe Hana Kazan, and Lila Lee Lawrence, grandson Sam Weaver, sister Chung-nan Lee Kim (Young-shik Kim), sister Chung-wha Lee Iyengar, and nieces and nephews.

A funeral service will be celebrated at the Towson United Methodist Church, 501 Hampton Lane, Towson, MD 21204 on Friday, October 25 at 11 am. Interment at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.

Professor Lee had a particularly strong compassion for orphans being that his father and childhood best friend were both orphaned at a very young age. His compassion led him to spend time working at an orphanage after the Korean War on Jeju Island. Should friends desire, memorial donations may be sent to The Board of Child Care Of The United Methodist Church, a non-profit organization that provides therapeutic programs and residential care facilities for youths in need of a safe home and specialized training to potential foster care parents. 3300 Gaither Road, Baltimore, MD 21244, or https://www.boardofchildcare.org/donate/

  • FAMILLE

  • Ock-Kyung Pai Lee, Spouse
  • Ann Lee, Daughter
  • Arnold Lee, Son
  • Grace Liao, Arnold's Wife
  • Sara Lee, Daughter
  • Michael Lawrence, Sara's Husband
  • Sylvia Lee, Daughter
  • Wayne Kazan, Sylvia's Husband
  • Clara Lee, Daughter
  • Bill Miller, Clara's Husband
  • Dr. Chung Nan Kim, Sister
  • Dr. Chung Wha Iyengar, Sister
  • Leah Weaver, Grandchild
  • Sam Weaver, Grandchild
  • Zoe Kazan, Grandchild
  • Lila Lawrence, Grandchild

Services

  • Funeral Service vendredi, 25 octobre , 2019

Souvenirs

Dr. Yung Keun Lee

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Biographie

Yung-keun Lee, professor emeritus in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University, died Sunday, September 29, at his home in Towson. He was 90.

Professor Lee, one of four children, was born in Seoul, Korea in 1929, to Hŏ Yŏng-suk, a doctor of gynecology and obstetrics, and Yi Kwang-su, one of the first modern writers in Korea, whose works have been translated into English (“The Soil,” Dalkey Press, 2017; and “Mujŏng: The Heartless,” Cornell East Asia Series, 2005). Professor Lee graduated from Susong Elementary School, and Chungang Middle School and High School in Seoul, Korea. He attended Seoul National University when the campus was evacuated to Pusan during the Korean War. Professor Lee then emigrated to the United States when he received a scholarship to study at Johns Hopkins University. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Johns Hopkins University in 1957, received an M.A. in Physics from the University of Chicago in 1958, and received a Ph.D. in Physics from Columbia University, in 1962. The Baltimore Sun published a photograph of Professor Lee shaking hands with the President of Johns Hopkins University, Milton Eisenhower, when he graduated.

In 1963, Yung Lee, Luke Mo, and Prof. C.S. Wu, using a Columbia University atom smasher,
performed precise measurements of the boron-12 and nitrogen-12 beta-ray spectra. The measured data matched the theoretical prediction within 3%, and verified the Conserved Vector Current (CVC) model of the weak nuclear interaction. The weak interaction is responsible for the decay of all but the heaviest radioactive isotopes, and the CVC was an important step on the path to the present-day Standard Model of particle physics. (Source: Gus Caffrey, Ph.D., student of Professor Lee). At Johns Hopkins University, Professor Lee’s area of specialty was experimental nuclear physics.

He met his wife Ock-kyung when his sister Chung-nan introduced them at his college graduation. Chung-nan and Ock-kyung were both students at Bryn Mawr College. Professor Lee and Ock-kyung were married in 1958 in New York City when Professor Lee was attending Columbia. He and Mrs. Lee moved to Baltimore in 1964 when he became a professor of physics at Johns Hopkins in 1964. They lived on Gittings Avenue until 1969, and then moved to the Hampton Gardens neighborhood in Towson.

He was a founding member of a Korean congregation that met for worship at Lovely Lane Methodist Church in Baltimore. Professor Lee was also chairman of the board of directors for the Baltimore Korean Language School on Taylor Avenue. Professor Lee helped Johns Hopkins students organize to obtain Korean language instruction at the university.

"He was a very loving and supportive husband and father,” said his wife Ock-kyung Lee, professor emerita in the Art Department at Towson University, in an interview. “He was so supportive of me that he would come to all of the openings of the art exhibits that I curated. Sometimes after I gave a talk, people would ask him questions, and he could answer.”

Professor Lee enjoyed playing golf, attending concerts of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and working on home projects such as designing and building bookshelves.

Professor Lee retired in 2004, and traveled with his wife, and visited his children and grandchildren.
He is survived by his wife Ock-kyung Pai Lee, and his daughter Ann Lee, son Arnold Lee, daughter-in-law Grace Liao, daughter Sara Lee, son-in-law Michael Lawrence, daughter Sylvia Lee, son-in-law Wayne Kazan, daughter Clara Lee, son-in-law Bill Miller, granddaughters Leah Weaver, Zoe Hana Kazan, and Lila Lee Lawrence, grandson Sam Weaver, sister Chung-nan Lee Kim (Young-shik Kim), sister Chung-wha Lee Iyengar, and nieces and nephews.

A funeral service will be celebrated at the Towson United Methodist Church, 501 Hampton Lane, Towson, MD 21204 on Friday, October 25 at 11 am. Interment at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.

Professor Lee had a particularly strong compassion for orphans being that his father and childhood best friend were both orphaned at a very young age. His compassion led him to spend time working at an orphanage after the Korean War on Jeju Island. Should friends desire, memorial donations may be sent to The Board of Child Care Of The United Methodist Church, a non-profit organization that provides therapeutic programs and residential care facilities for youths in need of a safe home and specialized training to potential foster care parents. 3300 Gaither Road, Baltimore, MD 21244, or https://www.boardofchildcare.org/donate/