OBITUARY

Dr. Manfred Erich Bayer

September 22, 1928February 27, 2015
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Dr. Manfred E. Bayer, 86, passed away at his home in Crozet, Virginia on February 27, 2015, with his daughter Ada-Helen at his side. Manfred was born in Goerlitz, Prussia (now Germany) on September 22, 1928, to Erika Helene Bayer (nee Pelikan) and Dr. Erich Ludwig Bayer. He is survived by his daughters, Dr. Ada-Helen Bayer Volentine of North Garden, Virginia, and Dr. Thora Ilin Bayer of New Orleans, Louisiana, and by his granddaughter, Anika Helene Volentine of North Garden, Virginia. Throughout his life, Manfred had an insatiable appetite for all things science. He studied at the University of Kiel, Germany, and obtained a degree in biology in 1949. He then studied medicine at the University of Hamburg, where he completed his medical clinical training in 1955 and received an MD in 1957. He also studied physics at the same university from 1957 to 1959, and was awarded a physics diploma in 1959. He later earned a diploma in tropical medicine and parasitology at Hamburg’s Bernard Nocht Institute for Tropical Diseases in 1961, and was an Assistant Member of the university’s Institute of Tropical Diseases and Parasitology from 1960 to 1962. In 1962, he and his wife Margret and their infant daughter Ada immigrated to the United States to take a Research Associate position at the Fox Chase Institute for Cancer Research in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He remained at the institute until his retirement, as an Assistant Member (1964-1967), Member (1978-1986), Senior Member (1986-1997), and following his retirement as Senior Member Emeritus (1997 onward). Among his many notable achievements at the Institute, Manfred was the first person to describe the structure and growth of the yellow fever virus. Over the years, his intellectual thirst took him from human and animal virology to even more specific studies of the structures that enabled viruses to invade cells. He researched and refined the use of water soluble embedding resins for electron microscopy, and this experimentation led to the production of high-quality molecular samples so thin that they can be applied to use in electron micrography. Manfred was the first person to obtain ultrathin sections of the changes caused to the cell wall of Escherichia coli by the antibiotic penicillin. The latter achievement helped guide the development of future antibiotics active against the bacterial wall. It was also during this time that Manfred and his research team discovered the structural units that form the Hepatitis B virus, paving the way to the formulation of a Hepatitis vaccine. Manfred also worked for the Lyme Disease Association, where he and his wife Margret conducted groundbreaking Lyme disease research in preliminary chain reactions, and was awarded a grant for his research studies on the effects of electromagnetic fields on Borrelia burgdorferi. In addition to his research activities, Manfred was an Adjunct Professor of Microbiology at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School from 1971 to 2000, and an Honorary visiting professor at Dalhousie University, in Halifax, Nova Scotia beginning in 1981. He won the Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science award (1977), was awarded a fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology, and was an editorial member of the Journal of Bacteriology for over fifteen years. In his spare time, Manfred loved traveling, fossil-hunting, birds, and artistic endeavors, where he created beautiful and unique welded sculptures – most being large-scale representations of the very viruses he studied under an electron microscope. In 2013, he and Margret moved from Philadelphia to central Virginia to be closer to Ada and her family. Manfred enjoyed the new landscape, the different birds and plants, and taking walks and scenic drives through the Blue Ridge Mountains around his new home. Manfred and Margret also continued to adore their ocean-side summer cottage in Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia. Margret passed in May in 2014, and as per their wishes, Manfred will be laid to rest next to Margret in a beautiful plot at St. Peter’s Anglican Church in Hackett’s Cove, Nova Scotia, Canada. Recognizing Manfred’s love of science, art, nature, and photography, one may hang a birdhouse or go for a stroll in a park in his memory. Alternatively, donations in memory of Manfred may be made to The Lyme Disease Association (lymediseaseassociation.org). Family will receive friends at a memorial gathering at 4pm on Friday March 20th 2015 at the Teague Funeral Home in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Services

  • Memorial Gathering Friday, March 20, 2015
REMEMBERING

Dr. Manfred Erich Bayer

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precious lewis

February 4, 2016

hey im very sorry for your lost and i will pray for you every night i'm really sorry i know this hurt u alot but he is looking down at you watching you every day

sincerely, precious lewis
xoxo

Urd Mdge Ziegeler

March 20, 2015

Dear Ada, Thora and families
When I heard from Jorrit that you have lost your father I was very sad.Onkel Manfred was my uncle and although we did not meet so very often, he and Tante Margret have always been a part of our lives.Stories were told, letters were written, there were visits, far too seldom. But it kept our fantasies alive, thinking about our uncle in America. His life was full of interesting moments, he inspired us as children and even as adults. Here in "Good Old Europe" we feel with you in this very sad time. We, that is Urd with Wilfried, Viveka and Arno from Kiel, Barcelona and Lneburg and Britt from Hamburg.
We all send our deepest sympathy and love to you.

Ken & Kerry Fordyce

March 19, 2015

We would like to repeat the first part of last year's tribute to Margret, because it remains an indelible image of both of them for us: A fond memory for us was attending a meeting of the American Society for Microbiology and unexpectedly finding the two of them there, with a joint poster session: Bayer, ME and Bayer, MH. How often we saw those names together on a paper. They were such a strong couple, making these discoveries together. They were also such a unique couple. In their conversations we saw a fun point-counterpoint, leading ultimately to a harmony which warmed us.

As a doctor and physicist, Manfred used his beloved Zeiss electron microscope (which he proudly demonstrated to us many times) to make ground-breaking contributions to medicine. But he became best-known to the patient community for his work on Lyme disease. At a time when he was already a Senior Researcher Emeritus at Fox Chase, he was touched by the plight of Lyme disease patients enough that Margret and he resolved to conduct basic research, some funded by the patient community and some by their own money. He was marvelously complex, caring and inquisitive, and we all benefited.

When we visited Manfred and Marget for the last time at Pier 3, we pulled into the dark garage and there he was, standing tall and straight, with his arms open wide. And that is how we will always remember him warm, gracious courtly, even - and proud. And we miss them both. Ribbit!

Patricia Smith

March 19, 2015

Ada and Family, We at the Lyme Disease Association are very sad about the passing of Dr. Bayer. He was a caring person and a gentleman and truly a professional in his work as a researcher. His dedication to unraveling the mysteries of Lyme disease was unparalleled. We worked closely with him and on a number of occasions over the years, I had the opportunity to sit down with him and with your mom to discuss the important work they were doing for humanity. I know he is missed by his family and certainly by all of us in the Lyme community. Pat Smith President Lyme Disease Association, Inc.

Sally Shepardson

March 19, 2015

Ada, Thora and Families,

I was very sad to hear of your father's passing. I worked under him for eight years at the Fox Chase Cancer Center and he was a wonderful mentor and supervisor.

I wish you peace at this difficult time and hope that you find comfort in your memories.

March 17, 2015

Dear Ada,
It was our pleasure to spend time with both Margaret and Manfred. What an amazing couple.
Suzy Bowman, RN
The Lodge at Old Trail

Jane Toll

March 16, 2015

Dear Ada,

I returned from Europe last night when I received your letter and the news of your father's passing. I am very sorry for your loss. Your father was a gifted scientist, a devoted husband/father, and a wonderful person. He had a profound impact on my life, and I will always be grateful to him and your mother for their guidance and friendship.

Your parents where so kind to me when, as a high school student, they allowed me to work in their lab. My summers from then on through college were filled with lab work, electron microscopy, and climbing trees to obtain gall samples for your mom. I loved learning from them and working for them they were talented, engaging and really fun. They were supportive of me through college and later pursuing my doctorate, and I was honored that they attended my wedding. Over the years, I truly enjoyed hearing from them about their work and life. They loved you deeply and were so proud of all of you and your many accomplishments.

It is very sad for me to think of a world without your father. He will be missed so much by those very close and by the countless lives that he touched over the years. I wish you and your family peace and comfort with the memories that you have. You are in my thoughts as you (and we all) move forward without him.

With sympathy,

Jane Rech Toll and Family

March 12, 2015

Sam:
What fun we had! I will always cherish Manfred's memory. He is a peak in my passage through this life.
Perry:
I remember Manfred and Margaret as very caring, gracious people, devoted to their science and to their family. Attached is a photo of them at our wedding in 1980.
Sam and Perry:
We are very sorry for your loss, Ada and Thora. Our deepest sympathy.
Love, Sam & Perry

Perry Watts

March 12, 2015

March 11, 2015

The Fox Chase party in heaven is growing, and I'm sure my aunt Betty is there to welcome Manfred in as she would have in life. We were honored to have become family friends with Manfred and Margret through Betty, and remember them fondly around the dinner table. The world has lost another great and gentle heart, but Manfred's contributions to humanity will live on through his scientific endeavors. We're very sorry for your loss, and thinking of you all fondly. Isabelle, Mary, and Tim Travaglini

Biography

Dr. Manfred E. Bayer, 86, passed away at his home in Crozet, Virginia on February 27, 2015, with his daughter Ada-Helen at his side. Manfred was born in Goerlitz, Prussia (now Germany) on September 22, 1928, to Erika Helene Bayer (nee Pelikan) and Dr. Erich Ludwig Bayer. He is survived by his daughters, Dr. Ada-Helen Bayer Volentine of North Garden, Virginia, and Dr. Thora Ilin Bayer of New Orleans, Louisiana, and by his granddaughter, Anika Helene Volentine of North Garden, Virginia.

Throughout his life, Manfred had an insatiable appetite for all things science. He studied at the University of Kiel, Germany, and obtained a degree in biology in 1949. He then studied medicine at the University of Hamburg, where he completed his medical clinical training in 1955 and received an MD in 1957. He also studied physics at the same university from 1957 to 1959, and was awarded a physics diploma in 1959. He later earned a diploma in tropical medicine and parasitology at Hamburg’s Bernard Nocht Institute for Tropical Diseases in 1961, and was an Assistant Member of the university’s Institute of Tropical Diseases and Parasitology from 1960 to 1962.

When I was little we played
We built our train set, raced toy cars,
Jumped over rocks, teased the waves.
You taught me about the world,
And you showed me how things work.

When I graduated with my degrees,
Your blue eyes twinkled with pride.
And when Anika came,
You were soon there, too
To see my little one and say
Hello, you are really great too.

But my father who loved me
Has gone where I cannot reach him.
Yet my love for him lives on,
I'll keep his memory alive,
and honor all he believed.
And just feel so very grateful
For all his love that I received.

- Ada-Helen

In 1962, he and his wife Margret and their infant daughter Ada immigrated to the United States to take a Research Associate position at the Fox Chase Institute for Cancer Research in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He remained at the institute until his retirement, as an Assistant Member (1964-1967), Member (1978-1986), Senior Member (1986-1997), and following his retirement as Senior Member Emeritus (1997 onward). Among his many notable achievements at the Institute, Manfred was the first person to describe the structure and growth of the yellow fever virus. Over the years, his intellectual thirst took him from human and animal virology to even more specific studies of the structures that enabled viruses to invade cells. He researched and refined the use of water soluble embedding resins for electron microscopy, and this experimentation led to the production of high-quality molecular samples so thin that they can be applied to use in electron micrography. Manfred was the first person to obtain ultrathin sections of the changes caused to the cell wall of Escherichia coli by the antibiotic penicillin. The latter achievement helped guide the development of future antibiotics active against the bacterial wall. It was also during this time that Manfred and his research team discovered the structural units that form the Hepatitis B virus, paving the way to the formulation of a Hepatitis vaccine.

Manfred also worked for the Lyme Disease Association, where he and his wife Margret conducted groundbreaking Lyme disease research in preliminary chain reactions, and was awarded a grant for his research studies on the effects of electromagnetic fields on Borrelia burgdorferi.

In addition to his research activities, Manfred was an Adjunct Professor of Microbiology at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School from 1971 to 2000, and an Honorary visiting professor at Dalhousie University, in Halifax, Nova Scotia beginning in 1981. He won the Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science award (1977), was awarded a fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology, and was an editorial member of the Journal of Bacteriology for over fifteen years.

In his spare time, Manfred loved traveling, fossil-hunting, birds, and artistic endeavors, where he created beautiful and unique welded sculptures – most being large-scale representations of the very viruses he studied under an electron microscope.

In 2013, he and Margret moved from Philadelphia to central Virginia to be closer to Ada and her family. Manfred enjoyed the new landscape, the different birds and plants, and taking walks and scenic drives through the Blue Ridge Mountains around his new home. Manfred and Margret also continued to adore their ocean-side summer cottage in Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia. Margret passed in May in 2014, and as per their wishes, Manfred will be laid to rest next to Margret in a beautiful plot at St. Peter’s Anglican Church in Hackett’s Cove, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Recognizing Manfred’s love of science, art, nature, and photography, one may hang a birdhouse or go for a stroll in a park in his memory. Alternatively, donations in memory of Manfred may be made to The Lyme Disease Association (lymediseaseassociation.org).

I thought of you today
But that is nothing new

I thought about you yesterday
And days before that too

I think of you in silence
I often speak your name

Now all I have are memories
And your picture in a frame

Your memory is my keepsake
With which I'll never part

God has you in his keeping
I have you in my heart.


Family will receive friends at a memorial gathering at 4pm on Friday March 20th 2015 at the Teague Funeral Home in Charlottesville, Virginia.