OBITUARY

John Franklin Lerbekmo

December 8, 1924November 30, 2012

John Franklin Lerbekmo was born on December 8, 1924 in Tofield, AB and passed away on November 30, 2012 in Edmonton, AB.

Services

  • Funeral Service Wednesday, December 5, 2012
REMEMBERING

John Franklin Lerbekmo

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Margaret Diamond - nee Liversidge

March 22, 2017

My memories go back to 1945 - just before the end of WW2. I met Johnnie ..... as he was called in those days .... in the UK whilst he was on leave from Continental Europe. Even then he was an impressive young man. I am now 90 years old but I still have fond memories of him.Sincerely,Margaret Diamond

August 12, 2013

just thinking about you grandpa... shine bright like diamond

July 2, 2013

although he has been gone more than 6 months already; not a day goes by that I don't think about him and miss him. I foolishly thought he would live forever. Wish you were here Dad... Love Janice

Baden Kudrenecky

December 8, 2012

It is sad to learn of Jack's death, not so much that life owed him anything, but rather it reminds us of our own mortality. While I have been absent for a long time, he was a quiet giant in my recollection, and his dedication to his family, profession, and sport were always an inspiration to me. I vividly remember all the good times our families had camping and visiting together. Please feel free to contact me at baden@baden.nu, as our lives are too short to remain out of touch.

Baden Kudrenecky

December 8, 2012

It is sad to learn of Jack's death, not so much that life owed him anything, but rather it reminds us of our own mortality. While I have been absent for a long time, he was a quiet giant in my recollection, and his dedication to his family, profession, and sport were always an inspiration to me. I vividly remember all the good times our families had camping and visiting together. Please feel free to contact me at baden@baden.nu, as our lives are too short to remain out of touch.

Rick Sliwkanich

December 5, 2012

As a member of the Edmonton Vintage hockey organization I had the pleasure of playing hockey with Jack the last few years. He was a true gentleman and a fine player. He almost scored a hat trick on me a couple of years ago. I miss him, and I offer my sincere condolences to his family.

December 5, 2012

Dennis and Gloria Zukiwsky Kona Hawaii-as a member and teammate of Jacks on the 1984 PreCambrians Championship hockey team....it was inspiring to play hockey with someone who had Jacks enthusiasm and love of the game at an age when most guys were in a rocking chair.....he was admired by all of us young guys and was a treat to play with .....our thoughts and prayers to the family....

December 4, 2012


Though a colleague for 37 years, I got to know Jack best by the many field trips we took together to prairie locations ranging from Caspar, Wyoming to Mandan, N.D. to to Davidson, Saskatchewan to Drumheller, Alberta and many points in between. Jack knew many of his field locations like the back of his hand, I learned to know them reasonably well and we collected many bentonites for dating. Not wanting to carry 50-60 lbs. of bentonite any further than necessary, we often took my car (four-door sedan with large trunk space) into fairly rugged areas over a farmer's tracks, and occasionally right across the prairie when we could. This sometimes made our return home noisy because of a damaged or lost muffler. Because our trips were mostly in summer , at the end of a long hot afternoon we needed to get in a beer or two before supper. Jack was beer aficionado, and we always tried a local or a special beer if we could. Jack was moderate, patient and self-contained in most ways and never drank enough beer to get tipsy. He was also long-suffering to put up with my snoring in the motel! We had several favorite field areas which were visited many times --- St. Mary's River, on the side opposite the Blood Reserve; Drumheller and vicinity; the south shore of the Fort Peck Reservoir north of Jordan, Montana; and the Milk River Valley. Jack always had his agenda for any trip well-organized, and we rarely sat around resting, except in the evenings. Few things ever irked or bothered him, and he was easy to be with; in the field or out of it.

Bud Baadsgaard

Halfdan Baadsgaard

December 4, 2012


Though a colleague for 37 years, I got to know Jack best by the many field trips we took together to prairie locations ranging from Caspar, Wyoming to Mandan, N.D. to to Davidson, Saskatchewan to Drumheller, Alberta and many points in between. Jack knew many of his field locations like the back of his hand, I learned to know them reasonably well and we collected many bentonites for dating. Not wanting to carry 50-60 lbs. of bentonite any further than necessary, we often took my car (four-door sedan with large trunk space) into fairly rugged areas over a farmer's tracks, and occasionally right across the prairie when we could. This sometimes made our return home noisy because of a damaged or lost muffler. Because our trips were mostly in summer , at the end of a long hot afternoon we needed to get in a beer or two before supper. Jack was beer aficionado, and we always tried a local or a special beer if we could. Jack was moderate, patient and self-contained in most ways and never drank enough beer to get tipsy. He was also long-suffering to put up with my snoring in the motel! We had several favorite field areas which were visited many times --- St. Mary's River, on the side opposite the Blood Reserve; Drumheller and vicinity; the south shore of the Fort Peck Reservoir north of Jordan, Montana; and the Milk River Valley. Jack always had his agenda for any trip well-organized, and we rarely sat around resting, except in the evenings. Few things ever irked or bothered him, and he was easy to be with; in the field or out of it.

Bud Baadsgaard

Philippe Erdmer

December 4, 2012

One of the giants of Alberta geology on whose shoulders today's generation stands, Jack was a true field geologist. He lived through the extraordinary era when Alberta's resource potential led the world and there was no limit to what was possible. They don't make geologists like this anymore and his scientific life accomplishments are a legacy of quiet, humbling inspiration. A life most well completed.