OBITUARY

Beverly Burnice Francis

August 12, 1930September 30, 2020

Beverly Burnice Wootton entered the busy bustling home of Edgar Allen Wootton and Claudia Burnice McDonald Wootton on August 12, 1930. She was the seventh of nine children and joined in the farm life outside of Goodyear, Arizona. She graduated from Buckeye Union High School in 1948 where she played tennis and developed a love of acting and singing. After graduation she earned money for nursing school by picking cotton on nearby farms. She entered nurses training in Phoenix, Arizona and earned her RN certificate. While in nurses training, she secretly eloped marrying her high school sweetheart, Donald Lee Francis. Since this was against the nurses training rules, they were married again at the end of nurses training. She was in a hospital bed at that time recovering from a near fatal traffic accident. This accident crushed her right arm partially crippling it. They began their marriage with $15.00 and living in a tent on her parents farm. Her determination pushed her to relearn many skills including writing left handed, playing the piano with left hand cords and touching the main keys with right hand. She succeeded in her chosen careers of nursing, then a realtor as well as an insurance and commodities broker. She was an avid teacher and taught the youth in her beloved church for many years. After retiring she and Don volunteered at a Women’s correctional prison for 10 years as church missionaries and teaching religious classes. Bev was actively involved in politics for the Republican Party as a committeeman and precinct chairman. She was actively involved in Toastmasters, encouraging family and friends to join. After retirement, she started taking art classes and developed a love of painting. Art was one of her greatest joys. There were two constants in Beverly’s life. They were a love of her family and a love for of our Savior Jesus Christ. Up to her last days, every conversation with her included her love for her ‘perfect’ children and amazing grandchildren! She often spoke of her gratitude to the missionaries, who brought the gospel to our home and she also spoke of the blessing it has been for our family to belong to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. She is survived by her brother Ted Wootton of Clairmont, CA. Her five children, Ron (Mary) Francis, Mindy (Colin) Gordon of Bountiful, UT, Marcy (Mark) Perryman of Cincinnati, OH, Jeanie (Mark) Hyer of Nine Mile Falls, WA and Shelly (Keith) Clark of Spokane Valley, WA. 22 grandchildren, 44 great grandchildren and 8 great great grandchildren. She is preceded in death by her husband of 57 years, two sons who died near birth, her parents and eight siblings that she had longed to see again. She was welcomed back to them on September 30, 2020.

  • PALLBEARERS

  • Jeremy Francis
  • Spencer Gordon
  • Larry Rupp
  • Jay Walker
  • Brandon Bradshaw
  • Andrew Clark
  • Joel Clark
  • Jared Clark
  • Colton Hyer
  • Samuel Perryman
  • James Perryman
  • Nate Murray
  • Mark Perryman

Services

  • Visitation

    Friday, October 9, 2020

  • Funeral Service

    Friday, October 9, 2020

  • Graveside Service

    Friday, October 9, 2020

Memories

Beverly Burnice Francis

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Megan Clark

October 8, 2020

Memories from the grandkids:

- When I was in high school I stopped by Nana's house one night with some friends. Nana told us she wanted to show us something in the back yard. She took us out back, grabbed a fistful of crabgrass and started eating it. She proceeded to tell us how she'd just red that native Americans used to eat it all the time. Nana had a safe installed, hidden under the carpet in a closet. She would tell everyone that came over she'd pay them $100 if they could find her safe. She was very proud to show everyone where it was after we failed to find it. Ronnie was coming into town so I called him and told him exactly where it was. When she challenged him to find it he walked right to the closet and peeled back the carpet. She was mortified. (Joel)

- Nana always taught us that “flattery will get you anywhere in life.” She also taught us the importance of getting a pedicure on a regular basis and it has become a habit for us now. Even though Nana had a sassy side and would say/do some wild things, the two things she definitely had a firm conviction of were that she knew who she was and she knew who God was. She never let anything, or anyone get in the way of that. (Mandi and Megan)

- I remember flying back from Ohio with Nana. As we were waiting to board on the jet bridge, Nana started dancing quite an impressive little jig. I’m talking a semi-tamed half Charleston, half Irish reel. Her eyes danced with her feet as she triumphantly proclaimed, “Do you think you’ll be able to do this when you’re 80 years old? I don’t think so!” I can only hope to have her zest (and her dance moves!) when I’m in my eighties. (Haley)

- I remember every year I’d get a peacock feather from her (back when they had the farm). Peacock feathers have always been special to me. (Sam)

Megan Clark

October 8, 2020

Memories from grandkids:

- I don't know where to begin with memories of Nana. She was such a big part of my life for over ten years and she taught me so much in that time. There were so many yard sales, ice cream runs, walks, and hours spent playing in her yard. One of my most cherished lessons and memories of her was sitting on her back porch swinging and looking out at the wonderful view (this was before her neighbors built that gaudy shed that obstructed her view). We sat there swinging and eating ice cream while she asked me to describe what I saw, specifically describing the colors of the sky and mountains. She explained that the sky was more than just blue, the clouds weren't just white, they had depth and dimension; they were a combination of colors. She continued by inviting me to always see life for the beauty in its depth of color and perception, to challenge what I saw in front of me in order to really appreciate the beauty in life. From that point on I could see how that mentality shaped the way she engaged with the world. She was always reading books, learning news things, and asking questions. She would always encourage me to learn by buying me books that taught me more about animals, red heads, and everyday life. When we went to the store she would always bring a sketch pad and sketch the faces of the people around her and question how they got to the point they were at or what is going on in their lives that made them have a particular facial expression or style. Nana helped me to see the world as dynamic and vibrant, not a just sphere full of static dull colors. Another great memory of Nana was like 5 years ago she got her hair dyed but it looked more purple than red. When we came to visit her she was dressed in a purple blouse tucked into purple pants wearing a white belt. She came strutting out and said her outfit was to help mellow out her hair (Morgan)

Megan Clark

October 8, 2020

Memories from the grandkids:

- I remember Nana as being doggedly determined. Sometimes that manifest in her trying to keep Papo alive longer than he seemed to wish by depriving him of fattening food against his will. Other times it was refusing to lose gracefully to my wife in a highly competitive game of kings on the corner during their first encounter. In the most important moments, it was demonstrating pure love towards people despite their best efforts. That ability to love was deep and it was on fully display throughout her life. And with that fighting spirit and quick affection came her endearing smile and mischievous laugh that will last in my memory the rest of my life. (Andrew)

-- We always lived so far from Nana and Papo that my memories are few. Impressions that lasted for me included how Nana was always such a lady. I've started to think of her as a southern belle with her beautifully coiffed hair, painted nails and lipstick. I don't think I recall seeing her without every hair in place! Nana always encouraged me to do art. I appreciated her gifts of paintbrushes, paints and how to books. She liked to find common ground with her grandkids. I spent spring break of my junior year visiting Nana and Papo. I remember doing art, exploring, making homemade orange juice, visiting the hotel, and spending time getting to know my grandparents. Nana's great legacy in my mind is her determination to hold fast to her belief in God through difficult times. Determined is a word that describes her well. She supported herself and her family through hardships. Seems like she always spoke her mind! Whether it was too much talking during card games or opinions about my future life choices, I always knew where Nana stood. I am grateful to have her legacy as a part of me. (Amy Rupp)

Cara Avery

October 7, 2020

Shelly, so sorry to hear of your loss and know that my thoughts, prayers and love are with you and your family.....God bless !!

Ted Wootton

October 6, 2020

See message entered by Maria Wootton on our behalf.

Ted Wootton

Maria Wootton

October 6, 2020

Beverly was my sister-in-law. She was very kind and accepted me into the Wootton/Francis family lovingly. I remember that one Thanksgiving Bev showed me how to make tamales for the Thanksgiving Picnic at Estrella Park. Everyone liked to have one of her tamales and that was the tradition. Unfortunately, I didn't learn how to make them. Tamales are difficult to make.
I also remember that when we went to visit Don and Bev at the "Bonnie Ranch" Bev would take us on a long walk. She was very active and showed us that walking was important. She was very hospitable. Ted and I and our sons stayed at the ranch during our Thanksgiving visits. This is our second visit to Spokane. The first time we had a good visit with Don also. Their home was beautiful and surrounded by some forests unlike Buckeye, Arizona in the middle of a desert.
Don and Bev liked travelling to Mexico. One year we went by car all the way to Guaymas. We went to a typical plaza here where they were selling all kinds of foods. Don loved eating shrimp. After this trip, we would say when we saw each other that someday we would go all the way to South America.
Bev, was in touch with us from time to time. She had a beautiful voice and she loved talking to her youngest brother Ted. She would call us when she heard on the news that some cities in California had fires. We appreciated her concern about us.
My husband Ted has a soft spot in his heart for nurses and it is because one of his favorite sisters, Bev, became a nurse and worked as a nurse at the County Hospital in Phoenix, Emergency Room. Night shift. Ted admired his sister for her strength and for doing such a difficult job.
Bev was loved by my family and we will miss her.

Natalie Bradshaw

October 4, 2020

My sweet grandmother was such an incredible Woman of Faith. An eternal example for me of kindness, loyalty and charity. I'm so thankful she raised such an incredible woman to be my mother. She did a really great job, as I have the best mother in the entire world.

Louise Beagley

October 3, 2020

What a beautiful woman . She taught me our favorite card game . Sending love and hugs to all

Tina Burns

October 3, 2020

I'm sorry about ur mom. Awesome playing KING'S CORNER with your mom. It was so fun.

Linda Abbey-Green

October 3, 2020

♥️

FROM THE FAMILY

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