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Barbara Youngblood Carr

5 septembre , 19383 août , 2018
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Barbara died August 3, 2018 in Austin, Texas, age 79. Barbara Ann Youngblood was born in St. Joseph’s Hospital in Houston in 1938, the first of three children born to Tommie Ancie and Alma Grace Day Youngblood. In her childhood years the family lived first at Tomball, then Singleton, and her lifelong love of music began with trips to Magnolia for piano lessons. During her teenage years the family lived in Bowie, Texas and she was a 1957 graduate of Bowie High School. At the graduation ceremony she was presented the school’s first ever Poet Laureate Medal, and she always attributed the development of her writing talent to English teacher, Myrtle Early Davis. She was a Bowie Lions Club Sweetheart, when playing for their meetings, and also was pianist at the Baptist Church.

She was a Civil Service employee at Sheppard Air Force Base when she married Milton Carr in Wichita Falls in 1959; and in the 29 years following was well-travelled as an Army Wife. Afterwards, depending on the company, she either boasted or complained about, having 17 times had to move her household, which had gradually grown in stuff and population as their three children had been born along the way. Barbara and Milton made their retirement move in 1988, choosing to return to Austin, best of all the places they had lived.

In Austin, Barbara joined the Lone Star Chorus, ladies singing group; and played piano, regularly at Bergstrom AFB, and occasionally at a few of the hotels and restaurants around town. She began writing in a big way, eventually authoring more than a dozen books (most of which she edited and some of which she also published), prose and poetry, mostly celebrating her Native American Cherokee heritage and about growing up in Texas and the Southwest, but also some humor and her own special cook book. Supportive of her husband’s veterans group, she was an active Auxiliary in the Military Order of the Purple Heart, and was also a member of the Retired Officers Wives Club. But, poetry was always her greatest passion, and upon finding a vibrant poetry community in Austin, she considered it too somber in tone, and set out to lighten things up. Her red hair and poetic sense of humor in her readings were enjoyed and can now be remembered by many. On the serious side, she served on the board of the Austin International Poetry Festival for 20 years.

Survived by husband, Milton, their children, all in Texas; Curtis of Bellville, Sean of Waco, and Kathleen and her spouse Martha Catano of Wichita Falls; their five grandchildren who knew her as the best cook in the world, and seven great-grandchildren who saw her as a source of endless entertainment; also, her brother, David Youngblood of Houston.

She still had songs to sing and poems to write.

Visitation will be on Thursday, August 9th at 6:00-8:00 p.m. The service is Friday, August 10, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. at Cook-Walden Chapel of the Hills Funeral Home, 9700 Anderson Mill Road, Austin, Texas. A private graveside service is at Willow Spring Cemetery in Willow Park, Texas at a later date.

Fond memories and expressions of sympathy may be shared at www.cookwaldenchapelofthehills.com for the Carr family.

  • FAMILLE

  • Milton Carr, Husband
  • Curtis Carr, Son
  • Sean Carr, Son
  • Kathleen (Martha Catano) Carr, Daughter
  • David Youngblood, Brother
  • Barbara is survived by her five grandchildren who knew her as the best cook in the world, and seven great-grandchildren who saw her as a source of endless entertainment.

Services

  • Visitation jeudi, le 9 août, 2018
  • Funeral Service vendredi, le 10 août, 2018
  • Funeral Service vendredi, le 10 août, 2018
  • Graveside Service samedi, le 11 août, 2018
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Barbara Youngblood Carr

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Beverly Stephens

11 août 2018

It is hard to accept that Barbara is no longer with us. We met in high school in Bowie and became good friends. Yes, Mrs. Davis was her favorite teacher and greatly encouraged her writing. I remember how upset Barbara was when Mrs. Davis moved her from the front seat to the back seat in English class because Barbara was smart and did not need monitoring as some of the other students needed. What a pleasure to see Barbara pursue her writing and performances so successfully. We will miss her at the high school reunions. Best wishes to Milton and the family.

Jennie Carr

9 août 2018

Barbara Youngblood Carr was my husband's Grandmother, my children's beloved Great-Grandmother, and an inspiration to me. Over many games of cards, shared meals, poetry readings, and beach vacations I had the privilege of learning from her life stories, laughing at her razor sharp wit, and admiring her deep devotion to family. I miss her so very much, and wish we had more nights together laughing over a game of cards with family. Her great-grandsons miss her already too, but we remind them that her love and spirit will continue to live through them each time they sit down to practice piano, help cook one of her delicious recipes, comb through their own curly hair, write a funny story, or share in the joy of being with family.

Susan Summers

9 août 2018

Barbara was one of my dearest friends. We shared a love of poetry, a similar sense of humor, and a love of interesting jewelry. We were kindred spirits. I have written a couple poems about her generous and fiery spirit and she inspired and encouraged many other poems from my hand. We always had a great time together, especially that crazy time in 2012-2013 when we did two Austin International Poetry Festivals only seven months apart. We drove all over Austin getting things coordinated and then we would have a good meal or a margarita and laugh. We spent long hours late into the night at Jim's restaurant having pie and coffee, working on poetry projects or just talking. Sometimes she invited me to come to Austin Symphony or the Ballet with her family when they had extra tickets. In many ways, she reminded me of my own mother and my heart aches for her children and husband because a strong presence like hers leaves an echo.
One more thing, since she loved accolades, here's one more. She's the Poet Laureate of our Hearts.
Much love to all of you, Susan Summers

Benjamin Pehr

7 août 2018

Barbara was a true poet, using language to compose works of beauty. She was a creator, not just delighting in the pleasure of creating art but doing so with a purpose for others. In her poetry she shared her world as she experienced it with the added offering of joy, insights, and wisdom passed to her audience. Her writings are imbued with her personality: those who never met her can still come to know her. And I can again visit her. Beyond this, Barbara encouraged and promoted many grateful poets. She provided public platforms for poets to perform and local audiences to be entertained. She hosted a monthly reading at Barnes and Noble bookstore continuously for 26 years without fail. Even as her health dramatically declined she insisted on being there or arranged for someone else to take her duties when she could not. This reading continues every month henceforward as a memorial to our dear friend Barbara.

Gini Gyorkos

7 août 2018

I met Barbara via the Austin International Poetry Festival director, Wendy "Christina Sergevenia" Podwalny in the late 80's early 90's. I attended several readings and social events that Wendy held at her home and Barbara attended. All the lovely poets I met via AIPF were delightful people. I am happy that Barbara led such a full and rich life. And she is blessed to have so many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Rest peacefully, and I'm sure Wendy's saved you space at that writing table up there in the heavens! Wendy thought highly of you and often spoke of your friendship.

Robin Blackburn

7 août 2018

I remember meeting Barbara at the Austin International Poetry Festival many years ago. She was so wonderfully vibrant and light-hearted, and her creativity and liveliness remain an inspiration.

john row

7 août 2018

I am devastated to hear Barbara has passed away. When I first visited Texas from England in the mid nineties for the Austin International Poetry Festival she and Milton welcomed myself and two teenage boys in their home for the best part of six weeks. They drove us everywhere, to poetry readings and historical sites and we stood surrounded by bluebonnets to have our photos taken. My son described her hospitality to his mum with the words "the food just fell out of the fridge". We remained friends and my visits to the festival always included Barbara's special concert at the Westminster care home. I cannot find words to say how much I will miss her laugh, her cutting humour, my favourite line being when she met my partner Stephanie and she told her I had taken a year to take up the invitation to visit her Barbara replied "Well nobody said he was smart" and I will miss her enormous generous heart and her refusal to bow down to adversity. My thoughts are with Milton and the whole family. Barbara Younblood Carr we will always love and miss you.

Sharron Lichtenberger

6 août 2018

Dear Milt and family.

I am so very sorry to hear of Barbara's passing. I remember her with great fondness and the good times we shared through Purple Heart and Retired Officer's Wives Club. I loved her books and poetry and her patriotism. Mostly I loved her candor and humor. She wrote a beautiful poem on the occasion of Bob's death that I still cherish. She befriended me when I was new to the Austin area and to Purple Heart. I am better for knowing her.

Sincerest condolences,
Sue Lichtenberger

Louise Richardson

6 août 2018

Barbara always made sure to call me and invite me to the monthly reading at the Arboretum Barnes and Noble. No matter how she felt she was always in high spirits, never losing her sense of humor, and she always tried to be at Barnes and Noble for the group. She was a highlight of the NeWorlDeli open mic for the Austin Poetry Society that she attended.

PoetKen Jones

5 août 2018

Barbara was a fiery personality and unique individual whose words and performances touched so many lives in the Austin poetry scene and beyond. Her seriousness of purpose shone in all her work, whether it was her Cherokee memory series or her humorous pieces. Her spirit will live on not only through her writing but also in the hearts of all who knew her. My sincere condolences to Milton and the family.

Biographie

Barbara died August 3, 2018 in Austin, Texas, age 79. Barbara Ann Youngblood was born in St. Joseph’s Hospital in Houston in 1938, the first of three children born to Tommie Ancie and Alma Grace Day Youngblood. In her childhood years the family lived first at Tomball, then Singleton, and her lifelong love of music began with trips to Magnolia for piano lessons. During her teenage years the family lived in Bowie, Texas and she was a 1957 graduate of Bowie High School. At the graduation ceremony she was presented the school’s first ever Poet Laureate Medal, and she always attributed the development of her writing talent to English teacher, Myrtle Early Davis. She was a Bowie Lions Club Sweetheart, when playing for their meetings, and also was pianist at the Baptist Church.

She was a Civil Service employee at Sheppard Air Force Base when she married Milton Carr in Wichita Falls in 1959; and in the 29 years following was well-travelled as an Army Wife. Afterwards, depending on the company, she either boasted or complained about, having 17 times had to move her household, which had gradually grown in stuff and population as their three children had been born along the way. Barbara and Milton made their retirement move in 1988, choosing to return to Austin, best of all the places they had lived.

In Austin, Barbara joined the Lone Star Chorus, ladies singing group; and played piano, regularly at Bergstrom AFB, and occasionally at a few of the hotels and restaurants around town. She began writing in a big way, eventually authoring more than a dozen books (most of which she edited and some of which she also published), prose and poetry, mostly celebrating her Native American Cherokee heritage and about growing up in Texas and the Southwest, but also some humor and her own special cook book. Supportive of her husband’s veterans group, she was an active Auxiliary in the Military Order of the Purple Heart, and was also a member of the Retired Officers Wives Club. But, poetry was always her greatest passion, and upon finding a vibrant poetry community in Austin, she considered it too somber in tone, and set out to lighten things up. Her red hair and poetic sense of humor in her readings were enjoyed and can now be remembered by many. On the serious side, she served on the board of the Austin International Poetry Festival for 20 years.

Survived by husband, Milton, their children, all in Texas; Curtis of Bellville, Sean of Waco, and Kathleen and her spouse Martha Catano of Wichita Falls; their five grandchildren who knew her as the best cook in the world, and seven great-grandchildren who saw her as a source of endless entertainment; also, her brother, David Youngblood of Houston.

She still had songs to sing and poems to write.