OBITUARY

Carlos Muñoz Rodriguez

June 7, 1938October 11, 2020
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A LIFE LIVED TO THE FULLEST

Carlos was born on June 7, 1938 in Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico. He and his older sister, Alicia, grew up experiencing poverty. At the age of 6, his mother Lucia left the home to find work and Carlos and Alicia remained with their grandmother, Maria.

Carlos remained in Guanajuato where he obtained his only form of formal education completing the 6th grade. Due to necessity, a young 12-year-old Carlos began working 12-15 hour days in order to eat for the week. It is here Carlos learned the strong and indestructible power of earning a peso. For Carlos, poverty was his motivator.

At 16, he and his sister moved to Tijuana to join his Mother. In an effort to increase his work skills, he began taking classes; welding and car repair were at the top of his list. However, Carlos also was curious about other skills, so he took a typing class. It was here that Carlos met the love of his life, Carmen. In 1956, they began a 5-year courtship that included weeks of exchanging endearing letters because Carlos had enlisted in the Mexican army and sent to Guerrero Negro to work in the salt mines. Carlos was eager to get back to Tijuana to be with Carmen for he knew he wanted Carmen to be his lifelong partner, and understood the responsibility of this decision.

Carlos believed hard work was a moral good. Carlos confronted everyday with a mindset of perseverance, diligence and meeting goals. In 1959, Carlos became part of the U.S -Mexico guest worker program, also known as the Bracero program. Carlos enthusiastically began working in San Diego as a welder, where he proudly worked on U.S. naval carriers such as the Midway, the Kitty Hawk, U.S. Constellation, Saratoga and others.

Carlos was also an entrepreneur at a young age. Carlos’s spirit of innovation and solving problems came alive when he saw a need for reconstructing engines and engine parts. After a full day of work in the U.S, he would return to Tijuana to work on cars, but also focus on the birth of his automotive business, Tromex. In addition, during this time, Carlos began building the home where he and Carmen would live. Carlos himself staked the house, laid the corners and stacked the brick wall. For Carlos, the 24-hour long day was not enough time to complete his daily goals.

On November 12, 1961, Carlos exchanged wedding vows with Carmen Vasquez at Maria Del Carmen Church, in Tijuana, Baja California. Carlos brought his bride to their newly built home and soon after, they began their family.

In 1967, after proudly becoming a naturalized citizen, Carlos brought his family to the United States. The settled on Darwin Place in South San Diego. By 1969, Carmen was caring for Liliam, Monica, Carlos, Jr. and Lizbet. Carlos had transitioned from a master welder to business owner.

From 1970-1980, Tromex transformed to Prokar and grew in size. Crossing the border was part of his daily regimen. Carlos now had three factories and many employees. His products sold throughout Mexico and in the US.

In the 1980’s, Carlos was invited to join local business and community organizations. Carlos thrived here and in 1982, Carlos was selected by his peers to lead the local manufacturers association. From 1982-1984, Carlos served as President of Tijuana’s Canacintra (Camara Nacional de la Industria de Transformacion). An organization that promotes trade and business domestically and abroad. Here he was recognized for his dynamic leadership and progressive reforms.

For Carlos, his home was always at the center. He tenaciously strove for family unity by requiring attendance at every family dinner, daily chores, assigned responsibilities and caring consequences. As the family grew, he was ever watchful of his children. He maintained a firm hand in their upbringing. His sense of work ethic was inescapable. Carlos worked six days a week until the age of 80 when he was diagnosed with mesothelioma. You would often find Carlos at his San Diego office counting freeze plugs with his grandchildren.

Carlos approached his leisure time in the same manner that he approached his life-with passion for the moment. Carlos enjoyed gathering his family and creating moments for teachings. Carlos was a lover of music and singing.

Carlos passed away peacefully on October 11, 2020 at his home with his family around him. He is survived by his partner of sixty years, Carmen; his four children, Liliam, Monica, Carlos and Lizbet; their spouses, Jorge, Thomas, Martha and Michael; his sister, Alicia and his nine grandchildren, Carlos, Martha, Jorge, Ana Sofia, Gabriel, Isabella, Miguel, Victoria and Diego.

All who knew him would agree that Carlos was a pillar of his family. His patrimony is his family and a love for life that he instilled in them. He created a lasting legacy that will endure.

Services

  • Visitation

    Monday, October 19, 2020

  • Funeral Mass

    Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Memories

Carlos Muñoz Rodriguez

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Monica Glover

October 17, 2020

Ana Peterson

October 16, 2020

When I think of Abuelito Carlos, I think of the many ways he brought us all together. Even when we may not have wanted a fuss, he knew it was important to dedicate quality time to family. All those Christmas shows, birthdays, dias del niño, and Thanksgiving speeches were times when I felt the most connected with my family and I couldn't describe what it's like to be a part of our family without them or without Abuelito.
When I think of him, I also think of what a hard-working person he was. He worked hard and was proud of his accomplishments and what he could provide for his family.
He was also very proud of us in whatever we accomplished. Because of this, I always felt so good sharing my successes with him and knowing that he was genuinely proud of me.
One time, when I was working at his office, I made an origami paper ball with drawings of the prokar logo and sellos on it. I brought it to him and told him that I made it. He liked it so much that he got some scotch tape and taped it up on the wall above his desk. I was not expecting him to do that and it looked so out of place there but it brought me so much pride and joy seeing it up there after so many years every time I came to help.
Lastly, I think of how he knew what was important in life and used this to teach us. He was such an influence and his speeches will be deeply missed but I know he will continue to play a role in our lives.

Jorge Peterson

October 15, 2020

Abuelito was the best grandpa anyone could ever ask for. I still remember going to his office with him when I was on summer breaks, helping him count sellos, and eating tacos together from the truck down the street. Or when he would let me drive his car because he wanted to teach me to learn to drive using two feet. Sitting on a bench next to the bay with him in Acapulco when all of a sudden a huge wave came out of nowhere that crashed on us and completely soaked us both. There's way too many memories to count, and so many things I've learned from him. More than anything a deep sense of importance of family. I'll miss him so much and know he'll be with us every time our family spends time with each other.

FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY

Biography

A LIFE LIVED TO THE FULLEST


Carlos was born on June 7, 1938 in Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico. He and his older sister, Alicia, grew up experiencing poverty. At the age of 6, his mother Lucia left the home to find work and Carlos and Alicia remained with their grandmother, Maria.

Carlos remained in Guanajuato where he obtained his only form of formal education completing the 6th grade. Due to necessity, a young 12-year-old Carlos began working 12-15 hour days in order to eat for the week. It is here Carlos learned the strong and indestructible power of earning a peso. For Carlos, poverty was his motivator.

At 16, he and his sister moved to Tijuana to join his Mother. In an effort to increase his work skills, he began taking classes; welding and car repair were at the top of his list. However, Carlos also was curious about other skills, so he took a typing class. It was here that Carlos met the love of his life, Carmen. In 1956, they began a 5-year courtship that included weeks of exchanging endearing letters because Carlos had enlisted in the Mexican army and sent to Guerrero Negro to work in the salt mines. Carlos was eager to get back to Tijuana to be with Carmen for he knew he wanted Carmen to be his lifelong partner, and understood the responsibility of this decision.

Carlos believed hard work was a moral good. Carlos confronted everyday with a mindset of perseverance, diligence and meeting goals. In 1959, Carlos became part of the U.S -Mexico guest worker program, also known as the Bracero program. Carlos enthusiastically began working in San Diego as a welder, where he proudly worked on U.S. naval carriers such as the Midway, the Kitty Hawk, U.S. Constellation, Saratoga and others.

Carlos was also an entrepreneur at a young age. Carlos’s spirit of innovation and solving problems came alive when he saw a need for reconstructing engines and engine parts. After a full day of work in the U.S, he would return to Tijuana to work on cars, but also focus on the birth of his automotive business, Tromex. In addition, during this time, Carlos began building the home where he and Carmen would live. Carlos himself staked the house, laid the corners and stacked the brick wall. For Carlos, the 24-hour long day was not enough time to complete his daily goals.

On November 12, 1961, Carlos exchanged wedding vows with Carmen Vasquez at Maria Del Carmen Church, in Tijuana, Baja California. Carlos brought his bride to their newly built home and soon after, they began their family.

In 1967, after proudly becoming a naturalized citizen, Carlos brought his family to the United States. The settled on Darwin Place in South San Diego. By 1969, Carmen was caring for Liliam, Monica, Carlos, Jr. and Lizbet. Carlos had transitioned from a master welder to business owner.

From 1970-1980, Tromex transformed to Prokar and grew in size. Crossing the border was part of his daily regimen. Carlos now had three factories and many employees. His products sold throughout Mexico and in the US.

In the 1980’s, Carlos was invited to join local business and community organizations. Carlos thrived here and in 1982, Carlos was selected by his peers to lead the local manufacturers association. From 1982-1984, Carlos served as President of Tijuana’s Canacintra (Camara Nacional de la Industria de Transformacion). An organization that promotes trade and business domestically and abroad. Here he was recognized for his dynamic leadership and progressive reforms.

For Carlos, his home was always at the center. He tenaciously strove for family unity by requiring attendance at every family dinner, daily chores, assigned responsibilities and caring consequences. As the family grew, he was ever watchful of his children. He maintained a firm hand in their upbringing.

His sense of work ethic was inescapable. Carlos worked six days a week until the age of 80 when he was diagnosed with mesothelioma. You would often find Carlos at his San Diego office counting freeze plugs with his grandchildren.

Carlos approached his leisure time in the same manner that he approached his life-with passion for the moment. Carlos enjoyed gathering his family and creating moments for teachings. Carlos was a lover of music and singing.

Carlos passed away peacefully on October 11, 2020 at his home with his family around him. He is survived by his partner of sixty years, Carmen; his four children, Liliam, Monica, Carlos and Lizbet; their spouses, Jorge, Thomas, Martha and Michael; his sister, Alicia and his nine grandchildren, Carlos, Martha, Jorge, Ana Sofia, Gabriel, Isabella, Miguel, Victoria and Diego.

All who knew him would agree that Carlos was a pillar of his family. His patrimony is his family and a love for life that he instilled in them. He created a lasting legacy that will endure.

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