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FitzHenry’s Funeral Home

3945 Fairview Drive, Carson City, NV

OBITUARY

Mr. Anthony "Tony" Francis Green

January 4, 1962October 29, 2019
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Anthony "Tony" Francis Green passed away in the early morning hours of 29 October from natural causes at the Carson-Tahoe Regional Medical Center. He was 57 years old.

Tony entered this world in Sioux Falls, South Dakota as part of a set of twins born to Dave and Renata Green. His brother occasionally reminded Tony that he was actually born second, to which Tony responded that his view during childbirth was particularly traumatic and likely scarred him for life.

Tony grew up in Sioux Falls with his two brothers and parents. Tony believed that the sacrifice his parents made to send him and his brothers to catholic schools was the foundation that enabled him to develop a solid education, sound value system, and open outlook on life as he matured into adulthood.

During the entirety of his life Tony fought to overcome significant health issues - nearly all related to a heart condition discovered soon after at birth - and that struggle helped mold Tony into a resilient, optimistic, and gregarious man. A series of critical open heart operations during his early years (before the advent of microscopic surgery) only made Tony stronger over time. His repeated success overcoming overwhelming odds stacked against him contributed to a sense of fearlessness in Tony. He was willing to accept risk. He did not shy away from challenges, and instead saw opportunity in circumstances where others saw only problems. And Tony always displayed an uncanny empathy for family and friends experiencing tough times. He could relate to others in a difficult spot and would be the first to respond and offer whatever support was needed. This unique combination of energy, optimism, empathy, and resiliency translated into a quiet confidence that no doubt influenced events such as classmates selecting Tony to be their Student Body President in high school.

Tony was an engaging and charismatic character. He found energy and satisfaction interacting with others. Not surprisingly, Tony made friends easily and he had many of them. He thoroughly enjoyed talking about his family and friends, folks he had just met, or stories of shenanigans with others. Tony’s personality was ideally suited for his love of theater. His passion for acting started at an early age and manifested itself in numerous community theater events throughout his adult life. Those skills also made Tony a particularly effective prankster, such as the time he took the entire family to brunch at a very exclusive resort in Texas by convincing the restaurant staff that he was a member of the private country club ... despite having no identification or other means of proof. He later told me his Club Sandwich was delicious, while I was just grateful we were not arrested.

After graduating from O’Gorman High School in 1981, Tony went on to South Dakota State University. But when he decided to start working full-time, Tony headed out west and never looked back. He initially started in California, but later moved to Las Vegas and adopted Nevada as home. For almost the past twenty years Tony lived in Dayton. Among his adult endeavors, Tony dabbled in everything from Hollywood to the renewable energy industry, but he was partially effective in real estate. Tony is probably best described as a jack of all trades while he grew in real estate related knowledge, experience, and expertise. He found his calling as a real estate broker - and absolutely loved working hand-in-hand with clients and employers in the local area and Las Vegas - but his projects and responsibilities also extended into Texas. Tony’s greatest satisfaction came from assisting those in need find quality and affordable housing for themselves and their loved ones. He found fulfillment witnessing the joy and pride of a family experiencing home ownership for the first time.

Tony’s outgoing personality was not just an advantage in the real estate arena - it was a feature attribute in his passion for life. He was a car and motorcycle enthusiast who never missed a car show or passed up an opportunity to for a summer bike trip to Sturgis. Tony was also an avid skier who eagerly awaited each year’s season pass to Tahoe. And, of course, he was a dedicated and loyal Denver Broncos fan, who has likely visited every Bronco friendly sports bar between Minden and Mile High Stadium. Shocking to this day is the fact that Tony married a former Oakland Raiders cheerleader (Maureen Johnson), thereby proving for all time and beyond doubt that true love creates emotions even more powerful than the most bitter football rivalry. More than anything else, Tony Green was, is, and always will be the most incredible son, brother, uncle, husband and friend. We love him unconditionally, miss him terribly, and find comfort knowing that he is being cared for in God’s healing hands.

Tony was preceded in death by his maternal grandparents (Anthony and Margaret Kappenman) and by his universally beloved father (David Green). Tony is survived by the love of his life - his wife Maureen, and her son Zach, as well as two brothers (Toby and Tom) and his mother (Renata Green Vest).

A funeral service for Tony will be held at Saint Ann’s Catholic Church on Thursday, 7 November, at 6 pm. A reception at the church will immediately follow mass. All family and friends of Tony or his family are cordially invited to join us there. The address is: Saint Ann’s Catholic Church 3 Melanie Drive Dayton , NV 89403

In lieu of flowers, the family kindly asks that anyone wishing to contribute consider a donation to Saint Ann’s Catholic Church. The mailing address is: Saint Ann’s Catholic Church PO Box 309 Dayton, NV 89403

Finally, the family is in the process of preparing an “Everlasting Memorial” to better capture Tony for posterity. Anyone having pictures, videos, or a memory / story they are willing to share, please do so here on this site.

Services

  • Funeral Mass and Reception Thursday, November 7, 2019

Memories

Mr. Anthony "Tony" Francis Green

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Steve Brooks

November 12, 2019

Rest In Peace Tony!

Phi Alpha brother!

Maureen Hopkins-Green

November 11, 2019

My Ton Man, another memory...Sturgis and Mt. Rushmore

Maureen Hopkins-Green

November 11, 2019

My Ton Man, another memory...Misfits fun 💕

Maureen Hopkins-Green

November 11, 2019

My Ton Man, another memory...Broncos game

Maureen Hopkins-Green

November 11, 2019

My Ton Man, another memory...Raider game

Maureen Hopkins-Green

November 11, 2019

To my Ton Man, another memory...you and Boo 💕

Maureen Hopkins-Green

November 11, 2019

Oh My Ton Man, my love, my life, my dance partner, my karaoke king, my love bug, oh how I miss you. You are forever in my heart and soul.

Carolina Avila Islas

November 6, 2019

CPLC NV Holiday Dinner 2016!

Carolina Avila Islas

November 6, 2019

Tony was a great coworker and mentor not only for me but for my husband Ty. Thanks to Tony my husband Ty was able to finally get his maintenance company going. Tony you will be missed very much. Thank you for sharing crazy yet exciting stories with me while you were in the office thank you for always asking about my kids. RIP Senor Verde!

Big B

November 5, 2019

The only known person to ever see the Forest through the trees!
Auf Uns!!!

FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY

Biography

Tony’s Eulogy-by Toby Green

The year was probably 1974 or 1975, about the time the movie JAWS was very popular in the US. Our family was taking its annual summer vacation. Now this vacation was quite a rite of passage - not all that different in some respects from Chevy Chase playing Clark W. Griswald in the old Vacation movies. Our parents and all three kids would pile into the family car, always departing for the interstate very early to “avoid traffic and make good time” - although exactly who or what we were gaining time “for” usually escaped us kids. We would drive across the country for hours - never exactly certain where we were headed or why we had to get there so fast. My mom would feed us drinks and baloney sandwiches from her impressive collection of Tupperware containers because it would waste too much time to stop for fast food. These family vacations all occurred before the advent of Expedia or Booking.com. We had no reservations, so by 4 or 5 pm each day it was time to find a hotel, and the only acquiescence my parents would agree to is that our lodging would have a swimming pool.

For us boys, a pool was absolutely essential, and Tony would assume a lead role in our endeavors. The three of us boys were basically all hitting puberty, and mostly thinking about girls. When the driving was done for the day, and we were in the hotel room, we could not wait to change into our swim suits and head for the pool ..... as my brother Tom and I crossed our fingers that Tony would do his thing.

Tony was born with a hole in his heart, between the left and right ventricle, meaning that his heart was not effectively separating the dirty from the clean blood. He was very sick for many years. In fact, DuPont Corporation developed a special material for this medical condition and Tony was the first to ever have it implanted in his heart. Before the age of 12, Tony had gone through 3 or 4 open heart surgeries. These operations occurred long before the development of arthroscopic surgery. Instead, for each operation, doctors had to cut Tony open from the middle of his chest, all the way around his left side, to the middle of his back. These surgeries left Tony with a pronounced scar across about half of his torso. But my brother had a knack for finding opportunity where others saw only challenges, and this situation was no different. You see, as soon as we got to the pool we were hoping to meet girls, and Tony had the plan to make it happen. He quickly introduced himself to others at the pool and casually mentioned in pointing out his scar that he was a lucky victim who had survived a deadly shark attack. Everyone was mesmerized as Tony explained how the giant Great White Shark bite had resulted in the scar across his upper body. Yes, our brother was a real life JAWS survivor. And it did not take long before Tony had girls enthralled by his story, as Tom and I anxiously waited for our brother to introduce us and have us join the conversation. Tony was the hook - and he was good. Tom and I were his grateful sidekicks.

This story from our youth captures a lot about my brother. He was a guy who wrestled with serious health issues throughout his entire life, but he mostly kept the pain and difficulty to himself. His significant heart problems were never an obstacle that slowed him down. Instead, Tony leveraged those challenges for his benefit. He found a way to have fun with it. Tony was always a bit of a showman - he was gregarious - an extrovert. He loved meeting and interacting with others. I believe his repeated health scares helped make Tony a fearless risk taker who embraced life and made the most of his circumstances. He loved cars and motorcycles. He enjoyed travel and skiing. He had more clothes than anyone I know. Tony loved birthdays and holidays. He always gave the most thoughtful and personalized gifts - albeit normally 3 or 4 days late, as my brother was rarely concerned about what he considered to be arbitrary suspenses or deadlines. He was not afraid to quickly switch jobs, move, or make a big life changes. Tony understood that life was a precious gift that might be fleeting, and as a result he was intent on making the most of each day. He was not going to be denied from having a good time.

Just under ten years ago my brother Tom and family relocated from South Dakota to Brighton, CO (on the outskirts of Denver) following new job opportunities. About that same time Tony began visiting Tom more often. He became a regular traveler to Colorado, particularly in the fall. Now I suspect Tom might still believe that Tony’s frequent trips to visit were somehow tied to a deep desire for closer relations as we all grew older. The simple truth is that Tony was a fanatical Denver Bronco fan, and Tom’s home in Brighton served as a convenient location for Tony to spend time in the Denver area and attend Bronco games. Sorry to burst your bubble Tom.

Anyway, whenever Tony did visit Tom in the Denver area, he and my brother rekindled their long-standing “Karaoke challenge” that had originated decades earlier. The two of them would hit the local bars, and since neither of them had much self-awareness of their vocal limitations, each was eager to grab a mic, belt out a song, and let the crowd decide who was better. Tony was always adamant that he was the reigning champ in this Karaoke feud. Tom, on the other hand, would insist that Tony’s relative popularity was simply the result of screaming songs that were crowd favorites - such as AC/DC or Metallica - while Tom would attempt to perform newer material that actually required him to sing. Sounds like sour grapes - but without taking sides, I will simply share with you that neither one of my brothers can sing, and the reason I was conveniently excluded from this contest is because I happen to have an incredible voice. But I am certain Tony will miss the Karaoke Challenge.

Although my brother wrestled with health concerns throughout his life, he never thought those problems could beat him. I think all three of us boys are strong-willed, but perhaps no one more so than Tony. He simply would not accept a diagnosis or medical advice he did not agree with. Tony was usually pretty confident the doctors were wrong, or too reserved, and that he could find a way to beat any issue or illness. For example, twenty years ago when my father was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer, we were all told my Dad had only four months to live. Tony would have none of that doom and gloom, and quickly began researching alternative treatment methods. Sure enough, Tony found medications for my Dad that the FDA had yet to evaluate or approve, he ordered the medications from across the border, and those drugs helped extend the quality of my father’s life for another two wonderful years that we were able to spend with him. Those beautiful moments between my father and my mom, his children, and grandchildren would never had happened without Tony’s determination to reject the medical experts and prove them wrong. Similarly, when surgery on my pancreatic cancer tumor failed this past spring, the oncologists at multiple cancer centers told me I was no longer a surgical candidate, and that I should simply enjoy my remaining 5-12 months with family. Tony completely dismissed this advice and started exploring other options for me. Not surprising to anyone in our family, Tony found perhaps the best doctor in the world at dealing with difficult pancreatic cancer cases like mine. Then Tony contacted the Mayo Clinic on my behalf, without even telling me, and scheduled me for medical testing and a comprehensive medical records review with this doctor. Well, this doctor agreed with Tony. I am currently a patient of this doctor, on an entirely new treatment protocol, and I am doing well - now six months after that surgery and having just had good results from a thorough check-up and series of tests at the Mayo Clinic this week. Maynard would be quite satisfied with this information. Of course, none of it would have happened without the stubbornness and hope and feeling of invincibility that Tony brings to any situation. He just refuses to accept bad news.

[NOTE: as an aside, you no doubt heard me use the name “Maynard” just now when mentioning Tony. You see, Maynard is actually Tony’s nickname. Tom and I have called Tony by the nickname Maynard for as long as we can remember. I cannot tell you why we call him Maynard, or exactly when it all started. But I do recall that that my mother really disliked that name from the beginning and told us to stop using it. Well, as you might imagine, when you are 10 or 12 year old mischievous boys, doing something you know upsets your mother, her reaction essentially sealed the deal - and Maynard stuck as Tony’s forever nickname. And, yes, eventually .... my Mom came around.]

Tony’s incredible toughness and ability to overcome obstacles helps explain why all of us close to him were so surprised when Tony suffered two massive strokes back on July 5th of this year. Our family watched him struggle with physical therapy and recovery from those attacks. Despite the serious challenges and our constant worries, we also knew Tony had an unmatched spirit, and none of us would bet against his ability to overcome adversity once again. In fact, when my daughter Courteney was married in late August, Tony and Maureen were right there to celebrate with our family, despite the fact that no one in his condition had any business traveling. But Tony would simply never accept any outcome where he would not be present for this celebration. Perhaps the one flaw in Tony’s approach was that my brother was always taking care of everyone else before he would take care of himself. His friends, family, and loved ones always came first. At the same time, he went out of his way to hide adverse information about his own health because he did not want us to worry about him.

So Tony’s sudden decline and passing last week caught all of us off guard, as he had been feeling better of late, and he was very excited about stem cell therapy for stroke survivors that he was scheduled to begin just two days after his death. I am grateful to God that Tony was able to pass peacefully, with Maureen next to him holding his hand. Tony had struggled so much during his life that he had earned this small respite. Of course, if we could talk to Tony right now, I think he might actually feel annoyed, arguing that if he had just been afforded a bit more time he would have figured out his rehabilitation and identified what was needed to get himself healthy again.

With Tony in heaven now he can reunite with our Dad, and that makes me happy. My Father understood that life does not give everyone a fair playing field, and Dad had a special affinity for Tony because he appreciated how much my brother struggled to address and overcome those health issues throughout his life. Our family feels better because Tony and Dad can be together until the time comes that God calls the rest of us to join them.

For my mother, brother, and myself - we know that Tony is in a better place and we are grateful for all the years he has been the glue for our family. I know he misses his wife Maureen, and wishes he could be here with her. But I am equally confident that he believes things will work out, and that life has so much in store for all of us. We miss you Maynard - keep looking out for us - we will see you on the other side.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Anthony (Tony) Francis Green passed away in the early morning hours of 29 October from natural causes at the Carson-Tahoe Regional Medical Center. He was 57 years old.

Tony entered this world in Sioux Falls, South Dakota as part of a set of twins born to Dave and Renata Green. His brother occasionally reminded Tony that he was actually born second, to which Tony responded that his view during childbirth was particularly traumatic and likely scarred him for life.

Tony grew up in Sioux Falls with his two brothers and parents. Tony believed that the sacrifice his parents made to send him and his brothers to catholic schools was the foundation that enabled him to develop a solid education, sound value system, and open outlook on life as he matured into adulthood.

During the entirety of his life Tony fought to overcome significant health issues - nearly all related to a heart condition discovered soon after at birth - and that struggle helped mold Tony into a resilient, optimistic, and gregarious man. A series of critical open heart operations during his early years (before the advent of microscopic surgery) only made Tony stronger over time. His repeated success overcoming overwhelming odds stacked against him contributed to a sense of fearlessness in Tony. He was willing to accept risk. He did not shy away from challenges, and instead saw opportunity in circumstances where others saw only problems. And Tony always displayed an uncanny empathy for family and friends experiencing tough times. He could relate to others in a difficult spot and would be the first to respond and offer whatever support was needed. This unique combination of energy, optimism, empathy, and resiliency translated into a quiet confidence that no doubt influenced events such as classmates selecting Tony to be their Student Body President in high school.

Tony was an engaging and charismatic character. He found energy and satisfaction interacting with others. Not surprisingly, Tony made friends easily and he had many of them. He thoroughly enjoyed talking about his family and friends, folks he had just met, or stories of shenanigans with others. Tony’s personality was ideally suited for his love of theater. His passion for acting started at an early age and manifested itself in numerous community theater events throughout his adult life. Those skills also made Tony a particularly effective prankster, such as the time he took the entire family to brunch at a very exclusive resort in Texas by convincing the restaurant staff that he was a member of the private country club ... despite having no identification or other means of proof. He later told me his Club Sandwich was delicious, while I was just grateful we were not arrested.

After graduating from O’Gorman High School in 1991, Tony went on to South Dakota State University. But when he decided to start working full-time, Tony headed out west and never looked back. He initially started in California, but later moved to Las Vegas and adopted Nevada as home. For almost the past twenty years Tony lived in Dayton. Among his adult endeavors, Tony dabbled in everything from Hollywood to the renewable energy industry, but he was especially effective in real estate. Tony is probably best described as a jack of all trades while he grew in real estate related knowledge, experience, and expertise. He found his calling as a real estate broker - and absolutely loved working hand-in-hand with clients and employers in the local area and Las Vegas - but his projects and responsibilities also extended into Texas. Tony’s greatest satisfaction came from assisting those in need find quality and affordable housing for themselves and their loved ones. He found fulfillment witnessing the joy and pride of a family experiencing home ownership for the first time.

Tony’s outgoing personality was not just an advantage in the real estate arena - it was a feature attribute in his passion for life. He was a car and motorcycle enthusiast who never missed a car show or passed up an opportunity to for a summer bike trip to Sturgis. Tony was also an avid skier who eagerly awaited each year’s season pass to Tahoe. And, of course, he was a dedicated and loyal Denver Broncos fan, who has likely visited every Bronco friendly sports bar between Minden and Mile High Stadium. Shocking to this day is the fact that Tony married an Oakland Raiders fan (Maureen Johnson), thereby proving for all time and beyond doubt that true love creates emotions even more powerful than the most bitter football rivalry. More than anything else, Tony Green was, is, and always will be the most incredible son, brother, uncle, husband and friend. We love him unconditionally, miss him terribly, and find comfort knowing that he is being cared for in God’s healing hands.

Tony was preceded in death by his maternal grandparents (Anthony and Margaret Kappenman) and by his universally beloved father (David Green).

Tony is survived by the love of his life - his wife Maureen, and her son Zach, as well as two brothers (Toby and Tom) and his mother Renata Green Vest.

A funeral service for Tony will be held at Saint Ann’s Catholic Church on Thursday, 7 November, at 6 pm. A reception at the church will immediately follow mass. All family and friends of Tony or his family are cordially invited to join us there. The address is:
Saint Ann’s Catholic Church
3 Melanie Drive
Dayton , NV 89403
In lieu of flowers, the family kindly asks that anyone wishing to contribute consider a donation to Saint Ann’s Catholic Church. The mailing address is:
Saint Ann’s Catholic Church
PO Box 309
Dayton, NV 89403