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Witzke Funeral Homes Inc.

5555 Twin Knolls Road, Columbia, MD

OBITUARY

Floyd Joseph Malveaux

January 11, 1940January 9, 2020

Floyd Joseph Malveaux passed away peacefully on Thursday, January 9, 2020. He was the devoted and loving husband of Myrna Ruiz Malveaux, whose passing preceded him on April 13, 2018. He is survived by his sister, Deltinez Benjamin. Floyd was a caring and inspirational father of Suzette, Suzanne, Courtney and Gregory Malveaux; a proud grandfather of Nailah, Bennett, Jacob, Richard, Gabriel, and Soleil; and a generous friend, compassionate physician, respected colleague, and dedicated mentor to many. Floyd had a modest upbringing in Opelousas, Louisiana, and was the son of Delton and Inez Malveaux. As a youth, he enjoyed spending many days with his grandparents on their farm, and swimming with cousins in the nearby bayou. At age thirteen, he left for boarding school to attend Immaculata Minor Seminary School in Lafayette, Louisiana; he departed from seminary school and returned to his hometown to attend Holy Ghost Catholic School during his senior year of high school. Floyd joined the faculty at Howard University in 1968 as an assistant professor of Microbiology after having completed Bachelor of Science (1961) and Master of Science (1964) degrees in Biological Sciences at Creighton University (Omaha, NE) and Loyola University (New Orleans, LA), respectively. He earned a Doctor of Philosophy in Microbiology (1968) at Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI). Two years later, he attended the Howard University College of Medicine to pursue a Doctor of Medicine while maintaining his faculty status. Professionally, his impact was far-reaching and unparalleled. All of his life, Floyd had asthma, and was the child and grandchild of asthmatics. This influenced his career path as he sought to help others who were similarly challenged. He honed his clinical skills in internal medicine as a resident at the Washington Hospital Center in the District of Columbia prior to completing his subspecialty fellowship training (1976-78) in Allergy and Clinical Immunology at Johns Hopkins University. His fellowship encompassed patient care, as well as basic and clinical research. His research findings led to the groundbreaking development of Omalizumab, an important drug that is effective in treating individuals with relatively severe asthma. As a MD/PhD, Floyd returned to the Howard University medical faculty in 1978, garnering a number of research grants from the National Institutes of Health to continue his research and patient care. He was appointed Dean of the College of Medicine (1995-2005) and Vice Provost for Health Affairs (2000-2003). In the spring of 2001, Floyd oversaw the establishment of the National Human Genome Center at Howard University. The Center concentrates on genetic variations and their relationships to the causes, preventions and treatments of disease among African Americans. He established a thriving, medical practice in which he tended to asthma and allergy patients with offices in Washington DC, Baltimore and Columbia, Maryland. In 2005, he retired from Howard University and embarked on a ten-year science initiative as the Executive Vice President and Executive Director of the Merck Childhood Asthma Network, Inc. (MCAN), a non-profit organization of the Merck Foundation. Under his direction, MCAN led efforts to implement innovative, evidence-based childhood asthma intervention programs in diverse, impoverished communities in the US (including Puerto Rico). Of note, one program was carried out in New Orleans in partnership with the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences of the NIH and the deLaski Family Foundation in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Floyd has always made it his mission to help underserved and at-risk communities get better access to medical care and increase awareness about public health. For example, early in his career, he coordinated the Schools without Walls Science Program for District of Columbia public schools, and later founded The Urban Asthma and Allergy Center in Baltimore. His impact is celebrated every year by the National Medical Association’s Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Section with a symposium in his name. Floyd was extremely appreciative of the “Floyd J. Malveaux, MD, PhD Endowed Chair in Public Health,” created by Howard University. The Chair will recruit a highly talented individual to lead the Master of Public Health program. The fund itself will be used to support the teaching, research, service, and other activities of the chair holder. This Chair was near and dear to his heart, noting “What I have learned through the years is there needs to be good research and evidence to manage health problems, but it is just as important to address the environment and conditions in the community.” Floyd was also a prolific scholar and speaker, and published his work in peer-reviewed scientific journals, presented findings at scientific meetings, and shared asthma and health-related information with lay audiences in newspapers and magazines. He served on numerous boards and received many awards and commendations for this work. He recently completed a personal memoir that recounts his life-long journey as an African American male who overcame segregation to achieve great educational, career, and professional distinction. In addition, his memoir showcases the loving adventures of a doting husband and attentive father. Floyd had a great love for family. In his later years, he immensely enjoyed being with his children and grandchildren, attending their school activities, taking long walks in the neighborhood, and playing their favorite game—charades. Floyd also loved to work out at the gym, meeting with a personal trainer three times a week. He often challenged and encouraged friends and family to join him. In Myrna’s final years, Floyd lovingly took on the role of her personal caregiver for more than five years, as she bravely battled Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). With his generosity, hard work, and great value for education, he also put his four children through college. The funeral service for Dr. Floyd Joseph Malveaux will be held Friday, January 31, 2020 from 11:00 am to 12:30 pm at The Washington National Cathedral, 3101 Wisconsin Avenue, NW Washington, D.C. 20016. Parking is available in the Cathedral’s underground parking (regular weekday rates apply). The repast program will be held immediately following the funeral service at the Howard University College of Medicine in the NUMA P.G. Adams Building, 520 W Street, NW, Washington, D.C. 20059 (corner of W St, NW & 5th St, NW). Everyone is invited to attend. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts may be made to the Floyd J. Malveaux, MD, PhD. Endowed Chair in the Public Health established at Howard University in Dr. Malveaux’s honor. Donations may be sent to: Kenneth R. Ashworth Howard University Development Office 1851 9th Street, NW Room 311 Washington, D.C. 20001

Gifts may also be made online at: https://giving.howard.edu/endowed-chair-funds/malveaux-endowed-chair-fund Updated funeral information, further details and guest book may be found at the Witzke Funeral Home website dignitymemorial.com. (Please select the Columbia, MD funeral home.)

Services

31 January

Funeral Service

11:00 am - 12:30 pm

Washington National Cathedral

3101 Wisconsin Ave. NW
District of Columbia, DC 20016

Memories

Floyd Joseph Malveaux

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Richard Murray

January 25, 2020

I’m sending sincere condolences to Suzette, Suzanne, Courtney, Greg and to the entire Malveaux family on the occasion of the upcoming celebration of the life of my friend Floyd J. Malveaux.

I first knew Floyd as a faculty member at Howard College of Medicine where I was a student, then later as a mentor and colleague in our shared interests in reducing the burden of asthma particularly in those less advantaged who bear a greater burden of the disease. I spent ten wonderful years, never far away from Floyd as he directed the Merck Childhood Asthma Network and was a close colleague at Merck. As Chair of the Board of Directors of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America and on behalf of our entire organization we thank Floyd for his ceaseless efforts to help children with asthma and for his personal service to AAFA.

Floyd - thank you for your friendship, your leadership and your positive impact on our world. This picture from post-Katrina New Orleans, reminds us well of this.

Willie McLemore

January 24, 2020

To the Malveaux Family

Bessie and I would like to express our sympathy during your time of bereavement. God heals all.
Dr. Malveaux and I were faculty members at Howard U. College of Medicine. He was in the Department of Microbiology and I was in the Department of Biochemistry. When he was accepted into medical school, I told him I always wanted to go to medical school. He encouraged me to apply also. I credit him with my being able to become a physician. He was always thinking of others. Through the years our families have remained close friends. Bessie and I would always get together with Myrna and Floyd whenever we were in Washington DC and had wonderful times. We were fortunate to spend time with him last year at our 45th Class Reunion. He always had something good to say. We will miss him
He is gone and but not forgotten!

Willie McLemore
MD, PhD, FACP
Class of 1974

Kathryn Bayne

January 24, 2020

On behalf of AAALAC International, I would like to express our sincere condolences to the Malveaux family on your loss. Floyd gave dedicated and active support to AAALAC International and its program of accreditation for 12 years. In that time, he took on the significant role of service on AAALAC’s Executive Committee, culminating as Chair of that august body. His commitment to high quality animal welfare and science, and enthusiasm for promoting AAALAC International’s role in the scientific community, helped our organization attain its unique stature. His contributions to raising the benchmark of quality in research animal care and use practices is one of his many legacies. He will be deeply missed by his AAALAC “family.”

Dr. Kathryn Bayne
Chief Executive Officer

Claude and Evelyn Tellis

January 24, 2020

To the Malveaux Family:
Evelyn and I send our prayers and condolences to the family. I have known Floyd since our days at Michigan State University. We became friends even though he was a graduate student and I was an undergraduate, even though he was a Kappa and I am an Omega. Maybe it was because we were both from Louisiana. Nevertheless, his friendship and support meant a great deal to me. Happily, our paths continued to cross in Silver Spring, Maryland and at the National Medical Association. He would take time to discuss his asthma research with me, especially as it affected the New Orleans residents after Hurricane Katrina. While we didn’t see him often, the times we did share together were special. We will miss him. May he Rest In Peace.
Sincerely,
Claude and Evelyn Tellis

Keith Levy

January 21, 2020

Dear Malveaux Family--

I had the good fortune of meeting Floyd as a member of the Class of 1974 Howard University School of Medicine. In the chaotic anxiety of 100 first year med students, Floyd was immediately seen as a voice of wisdom and experience. He was calm, thoughtful and helped guide us in the right direction.
Personally, as a young, white, naive 22 year old thrust into an unfamiliar environment; Floyd was generous with his time and support in assisting me to feel like part of the class. It was certainly no surprise to anyone that his career would blossom--and that his gifts would benefit the medical community and beyond.
I have long looked forward to attending our 50th anniversary in 2024. He was at the top of the list of those whom I wished to see. His presence will be missed there, as it will be in countless other places. He was a pleasure to know. My thoughts and prayers go out to his family.
Keith Levy, M.D.--Class of 1974

Gregg Bell

January 21, 2020

We lost a great one when we lost Floyd Malveaux.
When I knew I was about to begin work on a big public health project, my first words to Suzette were, "I need to talk to your dad!" Only a couple of sentences into my explanation of the project (a complicated state-level restructuring of Medicaid payments) Floyd interrupted me and with his usual insight and intolerance for double-talk, said, "It sounds like they don't like poor people." As usual, his insights were quick and to the point. Despite his own success, Floyd never lost sight of other people’s struggles.
I'm thankful for the influence Floyd leaves as a mentor. Once while standing in line at a popular boudin shop in South Louisiana, I struck up a conversation with an older man from Opelousas and asked if he knew Floyd. After a moment's reflection, he replied, "No, I don't believe I do." Just then, the man in line behind me said, "Are you talking about Dr. Floyd Malveaux? He was my advisor and mentor at Howard. I'm now practicing Psychiatry in New York!" As tempting as it is to pass off stories like these as unbelievable coincidences, Floyd's reach and influence are so great that stories like this are easily believed—my neighbor in Alabama, now president of an HBCU, for instance, yielded a similar story.
I will miss a lot about Floyd, but most of all, I will miss driving to his favorite rotisserie chicken place in Columbia to get dinner for the family. As great as he was, he never took the simple pleasures in life for granted.

Norman Miller

January 21, 2020

To the family of Dr. Floyd Malveaux

I met Dr. Malveaux as a classmate in Howard University Medical School. We worked together in the Department of Microbiology as well.
I was a white student at Howard just following the tragic assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King.
He was always a complete gentleman, and professional in all his affairs.
He was truly a power of example for all who came in contact with him.
HIs life is an ideal for everyone.

Norman S Miller MD
Class of 1974

Harold Yates

January 21, 2020

Rest in peace Bro. Malveaux.
Thank you for securing my job as a graduate fraternity resident advisor that enabled me to attend grad school at Michigan State University. That experience led to a successful career.

Feli Sola-Carter

January 20, 2020

Dear Malveaux Family,
It was a privilege to serve with Floyd on the Horizon Foundation Board. His commitment to service in our community, his generosity of spirit as a leader, his mentorship of many in public health service, and his devotion to family are but some of his fine qualities.
May you find peace and comfort,
Feli Sola-Carter

Lolita Burrell

January 20, 2020

I met Floyd in New Orleans 16+ years ago. We were in a conference session that heated up people’s passions over the ravages of racism on the culture and families of New Orleans, in particular how the color line fractured families when some members would “passe blanc” (pass for white) denying their darker relatives. I did not know him yet, but I remember Floyd standing up and asserting the research that supports human life originating in Africa. His statement did what he wanted it to, it really showed the senselessness of the social construct of race and the hurtful human divides that result.

I found myself in tears at the end of the conference and trying to be inconspicuous about it. A sweet lady approached me with a tissue and the warmth of the most motherly person you could ever know. It was Myrna, Floyd’s wife. She and I began to talk and not long after that, Floyd approached us and I met the other half of this dynamic duo. I would not know it then, but these two people would become like a mother and father to me.

I got to know Floyd even better as I witnessed him take care of his sweet Myrna through the trial of her life, ALS. And also when he was there for me during the trial of my life, an intense divorce. We spoke about all aspects of life - from successes to failures, the love of family, the racism he encountered in the simple desire to do his genealogy research, the quest to make things right in this world, and most importantly, we spoke about God and Scriptures. I enjoyed his intellect, appreciated his fatherly advice to “Stay Strong” when life was wearing me down, and will miss him so very much. Thank you Floyd. – Love Lolita

FROM THE FAMILY

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FROM THE FAMILY

Titus and Dad

FROM THE FAMILY

Titus and Dad II

Biography

Funeral Service for Dr. Floyd Joseph Malveaux

The funeral service for Dr. Floyd Joseph Malveaux will be held Friday, January 31, 2020 from 11:00 am to 12:30 pm at The Washington National Cathedral, 3101 Wisconsin Avenue, NW Washington, D.C. 20016. Parking is available in the Cathedral’s underground parking (regular weekday rates apply).

The repast will be held immediately following the funeral service at the Howard University College of Medicine in the NUMA P.G. Adams Building, 520 W Street, NW, Washington, D.C. 20059. Everyone is invited to attend.

In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts may be made to the Floyd J. Malveaux, M.D., Ph.D. Endowed Chair in Public Health established at Howard University in Dr. Malveaux’s honor. Donations may be sent to:

Kenneth R. Ashworth
Howard University Development Office
1851 9th Street, NW
Room 311
Washington, D.C. 20001

Gifts may also be made online at: https://giving.howard.edu/endowed-chair-funds/malveaux-endowed-chair-fund

Hotels near the Washington National Cathedral:

Kimpton Glover Park
2505 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
Washington D.C. 20007
(877) 219-2970
.5 miles from the Cathedral

Washington Marriott Wardman Park
2660 Woodley Road, NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
(202) 328-2000
1.1 miles from the Cathedral

Days Inn by Wyndham
4400 Connecticut Avenue
Washington, D.C. 20008
(800) 225-3297

The Fairfax at Embassy Row
2100 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
(855) 559-8899
2 miles from the Cathedral

Updated funeral information and further details may be found at the Witzke Funeral Home website dignitymemorial.com. Please select the Columbia, MD funeral home. You may sign the guest book there.

For those unable to attend, a webcast is available for viewing the Funeral Service. Please contact the family for that information.