OBITUARY

Rosie Verda (Carelock McVay) Warren

July 12, 1929April 14, 2021
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Rosie Verda Warren, 91, went to be with her heavenly Father and Jesus her Savior on April 14, 2021. She was born July 12, 1929 in Union County, Arkansas. Rosie was a member of Galilee Baptist Church. She was a talented seamstress and loved to crochet. She lovingly made crocheted afghans for all her children and grandchildren as well as many other members of her family.

She was preceded in death by her parents, William B. Carelock and Alpha Leister Carelock; her husband Guy (Buddy) McVay and her second husband, Bill Warren whom she married after Buddy's death; and brothers, Bo, Orland, Donald, and Julius Carelock.

She is survived by her son, Gerald McVay (Linda) of Flint, Texas, and daughters, Julia McVay of Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Elaine Blair (Richard) of Columbus, Mississippi; 8 grandchildren, Tracey Hyland (Rocky), Gregory McVay (Paula), Russell Blair (Vicky), Stephanie Solodovnikov (Misha), Chris Blair, Roger McVay (Lea), Tim Johns, and Charlotte McVay; 11 great grandchildren; 3 great-great grandchildren; brother, Jimmy Carelock; and numerous nieces, nephews and extended family members. Visitation will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, April 20, at Young's Funeral Home followed by the funeral service at 11:00 a.m. in Young's Chapel with the Rev. Dan Louman officiating. Interment will follow at Arlington Memorial Park.

Memorials may be made to the John R. Williamson Hospice House, 2301 Champagnolle Road, El Dorado, Arkansas 71730.

Condolences can be made online at www.youngsfuneralhome.com

Services

  • Visitation

    Tuesday, April 20, 2021

  • Funeral Service

    Tuesday, April 20, 2021

  • Burial

    Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Memories

Rosie Verda (Carelock McVay) Warren

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Colleen Jones Christianson

April 16, 2021

I am so sorry to hear about Rosie. She was such a sweet lady. I remember visiting a lot growing up. Mother loved Rosie so much. Sending prayers, love and hugs to all.


Colleen

FROM THE FAMILY

Rosie

FROM THE FAMILY

This is a picture of the Carelock children. From left to right
Front: Jimmy, Donald, Julius
Middle: Orland, Sonny Boy
Back: Bo, Alpha, Rosie

FROM THE FAMILY

Rosie and friends

FROM THE FAMILY

Rosie with friends and family

FROM THE FAMILY

Rosie

FROM THE FAMILY

Rosie
School Pictures

FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY

Rosie
as a young woman

FROM THE FAMILY

Rosie
School Days

FROM THE FAMILY

Rosie

FROM THE FAMILY

This is a picture of the Carelock children. From left to right
Front: Jimmy, Donald, Julius
Middle: Orland, Sonny Boy
Back: Bo, Alpha, Rosie

FROM THE FAMILY

Rosie and friends

FROM THE FAMILY

Rosie with friends and family

FROM THE FAMILY

Rosie

FROM THE FAMILY

Rosie
School Pictures

FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY

Rosie
as a young woman

FROM THE FAMILY

Rosie
School Days

FROM THE FAMILY

Rosie
Graduation Picture
at home

Biography

Rosie Verda Carelock McVay Warren was a very creative lady with an independent spirit and an “I can do this” attitude. She was inquisitive and enjoyed learning how things worked. Rosie had the ability to find solutions to any difficulties she had to face. She was an entertaining conversationalist who told great stories. She also enjoyed verbally sparring with people she knew well; and those who knew her best often remarked that Rosie loved to argue just for argument’s sake. Rosie’s curiosity, confidence, and endurance during adversity was an inspiration to all who knew her.

Rosie was born on July 12, 1929, just south of Bethel Chapel Assembly of God Church in Union County, Arkansas. Her parents were William (Willie) Carelock and Alpha Alberta Leister Carelock. She was the oldest of seven children and the only girl. Her brothers were Bo, Orland, Donald, Jimmy, Julius and Rodney Gerald who died at birth. Except for short periods of time when the family moved to the Dodge City Community and Reader, Arkansas, Rosie grew up in the Parkers Chapel Community. Times were hard for the family as the country was in the middle of the Great Depression. Because Rosie’s mother often worked outside the home to help make ends meet, Rosie had to assume a lot of the responsibility of caring for her brothers. So very early in life she learned to work hard and be resourceful. Rosie attended Jones School until it merged with Parkers Chapel School. She graduated from Parkers Chapel High School in 1947. Rosie was known in school for her intelligence, friendly smile, and loyalty to friends. The relationships she formed in those early years became life-long friendships that she maintained for the rest of her life.

It was while Rosie was in high school she met her future husband, Guy Thomas McVay (Buddy). Even though he did not attend school long, the budding romance was helped along by Buddy’s sister, Virginia, who would pass notes between the two. They were married on June 1, 1947 at Buddy’s mother’s home. The bridesmaids were Rosie’s cousins, Dorothy Carelock, Melba Leister, and Fayrene Carelock. Buddy’s younger sisters picked wild roses for the wedding.

Rosie quickly found herself a mother with three children. A son, Gerald born in 1948, and two daughters; Judy born in 1949, and Elaine born in 1950. The young family had several homes the first few years. They lived in the Houston-Galveston area for brief periods and at one time lived in a small trailer next to Rosie’s parents’ home. Buddy then built a small two room house that they lived in for a period of time. During this time they bought a country store which Rosie ran for several years. She said she had to shut it down because people couldn’t or wouldn’t pay for the groceries they had bought on credit. Within a few years Buddy and Rosie purchased a home on the Southfield Road which was halfway between both their parents. This was to be Rosie’s primary residence for the rest of her life. It was here she raised her three children, experienced the death of two husbands, and worked hard to keep the home during some rough times.

Once Rosie and her family settled into their Southfield Road home there were lots of family gatherings because many family members lived nearby. Everyone loved Rosie’s cooking. The family enjoyed exchanging recipes, sewing patterns, and passing on a little family gossip. Rosie’s laughter and hospitality was contagious.

It was during this time of her life that Rosie was beginning to develop her artistic skills. She could not only sew, knit, and crochet but she learned to make useful items out of ordinary materials. She used pine needles to make pot holders, and later used Walmart bags to make rugs. She was so proud the year her Walmart rugs won first place in the recycling category at the county fair. She really enjoyed making things, many of which she gave away.

Rosie’s faith in Jesus was important to her and she passed that heritage of Christian faith on to her children. She was a member of Bethel Assembly of God Church and later of Galilee Baptist Church where she taught Sunday School and helped plan and host church fellowships.

About the time the kids were leaving the nest, Buddy developed heart problems that led to Rosie becoming not only a homemaker but a caregiver and family provider. She took good care of Buddy during his disability until his death in 1972. She held jobs at Cooper Tire and High Capacity as an assembly worker. During those hard times Rosie’s strength, endurance, and self-reliance developed and grew.

In the late 70’s, neighbors introduced Rosie to Bill Warren. In a short time, the couple were married on December 6, 1979. Although Rosie and Bill lived in south Louisiana until he retired, Rosie kept her home in El Dorado. After Bill’s retirement they lived in Morrison Bluff, Arkansas for a while, but soon settled down in her home on the Southfield Road. Rosie continued to work, caring for older people in their homes. When Bill developed Parkinson’s disease in his later years Rosie became his caregiver.

After Bill’s death in 2007, Rosie was able to live independently in her home for a long time. She stayed busy visiting and being visited by friends and family. She continued to crochet, sew, and make other handcrafts for her family. As she aged and began to have health issues because of uncontrolled diabetes she was blessed to have family members help her so she was able to stay at home longer than most people. Her brother Julius came most every day to check on her; and he and her sister-in-law, Virginia were faithful to drive her to the doctor and to get her groceries and other things she needed.

As Rosie’s health continued to decline it became necessary for her to go live with her daughter, Elaine in Mississippi. There Rosie was surrounded by Elaine’s family and enjoyed several good years with them. She enjoyed phone visits with the rest of the family and her friends during her time in Mississippi. Near the end of her life, her daughter Judy went to Elaine’s to help care for her. As Rosie had done most of her life, she fought the good fight to the end. But the numerous problems associated with advanced diabetes became too much for her to fight. Rosie passed away on April 14, 2021, at the age of 91 at the Trinity Comfort Care Unit, Columbus, Mississippi. Services were held at Youngs Funeral Home in El Dorado, Arkansas. Rosie was laid to rest in Arlington Memorial Park, El Dorado, Arkansas.