OBITUARY

Douglas Terrell Woods

July 31, 1946June 15, 2018
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Vergil Neff Woods & Ethel Marie Woods were from Arkansas and moved to Paducha Kentucky and started a family. They had eight children, Bob, Jim, Joyce, Allen, Douglas, Julia, Joe, and Thom. My Father, Douglas Woods was born in Paducha, KY. On July 31st, 1946 In 1954 Vergil and Ethel moved to California with Joyce, Allen, Douglas, Julia, Joe, and Thom, in hopes of more opportunities. In 1964 Doug graduated High school in Bakersfield, CA. On August 23rd, 1967 Doug Joined the Army He did his basic training in Fort Ord, in Monterey, Ca. He then served in Vietnam. While Doug was overseas, he was stationed as a guard, worked on a patrol boat, and was a cook. He never talked much about his time in Vietnam, but there was this one story he loved to tell. One time as cook he was making dinner for his platoon. That night they were having chicken except for the Sargent, who apparently rated a steak. My father thinking he had every right to eat steak as the Sargent decided to right this injustice and ate the steak. After thoroughly enjoying his meal it had dawned on my father he still had serve the Sargent his steak. In a panic he went through the kitchen supplies and even contacted a nearby base to replace the steak. I’m not sure if he succeeded in replacing the steak but that sure sounds like something my father would do. After two years serving in the army, he was honorably discharged in Sep 11th, 1969 After Doug return to the states he caught up with his family. He enjoyed going mini golfing or hanging out and catching up with his brothers. He even dressed up in his army uniform to be the best man at his brother’s wedding. My father met my mother, Mary Caldwell in the Summer of 1971 at a place called the Blackboard. They had hit it off instantly and were married on December 27th, 1971. My father loved my mother with all his heart for all his life. I think he also loved how gullible she was at times. When they first got together my father told my mother that his father was a very mean man and would beat him with straps and chains. My mother hated my grandfather until one day she was listening to a comedy record and heard the exact same story. Needless to say, she was not very happy with him. But that’s how my father was, he loved to tell a story from time to time. Two years later, Nov 03rd 1973 Doug and Mary had a son Terry Woods. My father was a very good father even though he and my mother divorced in 1980. He was a devoted dad, and helped whenever he could. Growing up he shared his loves for fishing, hiking, billiards, archery, and motorcycles with me. My father was also an amazing pool player. He was very good at playing bank shots he never needed a strait shot to make a ball, and always planed at least three shots ahead. I can still hear his battle cry at the table “Now we start!” He was the one that taught me to ride a motorcycle. The first time I rode a motorcycle it was a church parking lot. I let go of the clutch and that bike took off and I almost drove off in to a field and crashed. But to be fair word has it that his first time on a Motorcycle he was literally bouncing off cars and an apartment building. So, I guess I didn’t do too bad for my first time. He always liked to make things fun. One time at an archery competition he dressed up as a blind archer and his brother went along with it and was calling out yardage. He kept hitting target after target. The best part of that was when another group finally asked at what distance can’t you see. My father didn’t just try to be my buddy though. He was a parent that would put me in my place when it was needed. The best advice he ever gave me was when I was 18. We were in an argument and he said to me “When are you going to get of your ass and blaze your own trail” it may not be the most inspirational quote you’ve ever heard but that argument with my dad stuck with me and made me the Man I am today. Not only was Douglas and Father but He was a Grandfather of six Grandchildren Sophie, Alex, Jeff, Katelynn, Conner, and Samantha. Some of my favorite memories is of him holding Alex or Katelynn as a baby. He looked so scared like he was going to break them or something. I loved watching him go fishing or hiking with them. And even when could no longer run around with them he still made time to go on a walk and have coffee with Samantha. Or be the first to say happy birthday to any of them. You could see how proud and how much he loved his grandchildren. In the end what can I say, Douglas Woods was a good man. He served his country as a soldier, loving brother, father, and grandfather, and was a friend you could always count on. If you needed it he would give you his last dollar. As a father he was always there for me and did his best to provide for me. He taught me right from wrong, to stand up for myself and others, and to never take BS from others. Not always in his words but Always in his Actions. Thanks Dad.

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Douglas Terrell Woods

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Biography

Vergil Neff Woods & Ethel Marie Woods were from Arkansas and moved to Paducha Kentucky and started a family. They had eight children, Bob, Jim, Joyce, Allen, Douglas, Julia, Joe, and Thom.
My Father, Douglas Woods was born in Paducha, KY. On July 31st, 1946
In 1954 Vergil and Ethel moved to California with Joyce, Allen, Douglas, Julia, Joe, and Thom, in hopes of more opportunities.
In 1964 Doug graduated High school in Bakersfield, CA.
On August 23rd, 1967 Doug Joined the Army
He did his basic training in Fort Ord, in Monterey, Ca.
He then served in Vietnam. While Doug was overseas, he was stationed as a guard, worked on a patrol boat, and was a cook. He never talked much about his time in Vietnam, but there was this one story he loved to tell. One time as cook he was making dinner for his platoon. That night they were having chicken except for the Sargent, who apparently rated a steak. My father thinking he had every right to eat steak as the Sargent decided to right this injustice and ate the steak. After thoroughly enjoying his meal it had dawned on my father he still had serve the Sargent his steak. In a panic he went through the kitchen supplies and even contacted a nearby base to replace the steak. I’m not sure if he succeeded in replacing the steak but that sure sounds like something my father would do.
After two years serving in the army, he was honorably discharged in Sep 11th, 1969
After Doug return to the states he caught up with his family. He enjoyed going mini golfing or hanging out and catching up with his brothers. He even dressed up in his army uniform to be the best man at his brother’s wedding.
My father met my mother, Mary Caldwell in the Summer of 1971 at a place called the Blackboard. They had hit it off instantly and were married on December 27th, 1971. My father loved my mother with all his heart for all his life. I think he also loved how gullible she was at times. When they first got together my father told my mother that his father was a very mean man and would beat him with straps and chains. My mother hated my grandfather until one day she was listening to a comedy record and heard the exact same story. Needless to say, she was not very happy with him. But that’s how my father was, he loved to tell a story from time to time.
Two years later, Nov 03rd 1973 Doug and Mary had a son Terry Woods.
My father was a very good father even though he and my mother divorced in 1980. He was a devoted dad, and helped whenever he could. Growing up he shared his loves for fishing, hiking, billiards, archery, and motorcycles with me. My father was also an amazing pool player. He was very good at playing bank shots he never needed a strait shot to make a ball, and always planed at least three shots ahead. I can still hear his battle cry at the table “Now we start!”
He was the one that taught me to ride a motorcycle. The first time I rode a motorcycle it was a church parking lot. I let go of the clutch and that bike took off and I almost drove off in to a field and crashed. But to be fair word has it that his first time on a Motorcycle he was literally bouncing off cars and an apartment building. So, I guess I didn’t do too bad for my first time.
He always liked to make things fun. One time at an archery competition he dressed up as a blind archer and his brother went along with it and was calling out yardage. He kept hitting target after target. The best part of that was when another group finally asked at what distance can’t you see.
My father didn’t just try to be my buddy though. He was a parent that would put me in my place when it was needed.
The best advice he ever gave me was when I was 18. We were in an argument and he said to me “When are you going to get of your ass and blaze your own trail” it may not be the most inspirational quote you’ve ever heard but that argument with my dad stuck with me and made me the Man I am today.
Not only was Douglas and Father but He was a Grandfather of six Grandchildren
Sophie, Alex, Jeff, Katelynn, Conner, and Samantha. Some of my favorite memories is of him holding Alex or Katelynn as a baby. He looked so scared like he was going to break them or something. I loved watching him go fishing or hiking with them. And even when could no longer run around with them he still made time to go on a walk and have coffee with Samantha. Or be the first to say happy birthday to any of them. You could see how proud and how much he loved his grandchildren.
In the end what can I say, Douglas Woods was a good man. He served his country as a soldier, loving brother, father, and grandfather, and was a friend you could always count on. If you needed it he would give you his last dollar.
As a father he was always there for me and did his best to provide for me. He taught me right from wrong, to stand up for myself and others, and to never take BS from others. Not always in his words but Always in his Actions. Thanks Dad.