OBITUARY

Violet June Carlson

February 7, 1929October 21, 2018

Violet June (Benson) Carlson, 89, of Greeley passed away October 21, 2018 at North Colorado Medical Center in Greeley. Violet was born February 7, 1929, in Greeley, CO, to Aaron V and Esther Linnea (Rapp) Benson.

Clarence and Violet were married October 25, 1953 at First Lutheran Church in Longmont, CO. This week they celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary, calling it close enough! They first met at a Swedish dance in Eaton, CO as Violet was selling tickets. Clarence asked Violet to dance the Hambo and have been dancing together hand-in-hand ever since. Violet graduated from Eaton High School (1947), and CU School of Nursing (1951) with an RN, BSN.

For over 20 years, Violet served Weld County in the Health Department as a public health nurse where she helped run mass immunization programs and addressed other community health needs. Her specialty was maternity and child healthcare. She traveled to several schools and homes, where her patients and their families considered her their personal visiting angel. Violet was a loving wife, daughter, sister, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, friend, and so much more. Her strong voice, persevering strength, servant leadership were inspiring to us all. Violet was one of the most thoughtful and involved member of our family and community, always giving generously of herself and so much more. She always put others first and was so welcoming and made everyone feel at home in every environment with her big, beautiful smile and never-ending hospitality.

She was a member of Immanuel Lutheran Church, Sewing Club at Immanuel, Member and Officer of the Northern Colorado Swedish Heritage Society, Farmerette Club, Country Circle, and Pinochle Club of Brighton, and a 4-H leader. Violet was an avid painter, seamstress, card player, gardener, value shopper, and cook. She enjoyed reading about and trying out new recipes as well as traveling. Violet honored and cherished her Swedish heritage and loved passing on this love to her children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Many wonderful memories were made while attending Hyllningsfest in Lindsborg, Kansas, and events at the Swedish Heritage Club in Greeley. Violet followed all the Colorado athletic professional teams, especially the Rockies. She could even tell us about the opposing team’s pitchers. Violet also enjoyed dancing, especially at family weddings where she and Clarence were often the last ones on the dance floor. She was also her children and grandchildren’s biggest cheerleader, and she and Clarence were constants in the stands of her grandchildren’s athletic and extracurricular events. Family was always priority, and she often said, “Home is best.”

Violet is survived by her husband, Clarence Carlson, of LaSalle; sister, Shirley Uhrich; sister-in-law, Elaine Luther; four daughters and sons-in-law: Linda and Stan Gingerich, Cheryl and Bret Clausen, Marcia and Randy Carlson, and Janet and Mike Crespin; ten grandchildren: Katie (Clausen) and husband Matt Denman, Eric Clausen, Emily (Clausen) and husband Brandon Clum, Michael Crespin, Linnea Gingerich, Matthew Crespin and wife Ashley, Brooks Carlson, Kendell Carlson, Micayla Crespin, and Blake Carlson; four great-grandchildren: Austin Denman, Taylor Denman, Christopher Crespin, and Eveline Violet Clum.

She was preceded in death by her parents, Aaron V and Esther (Rapp) Benson; siblings Agnes Hawley (Charles), Carl Benson (Phyllis), Ken Benson (Clarice), Ed Benson, Sonja Benson; and nephews Kurt Benson, Lee Benson and Jeff Uhrich; and niece Kathy Uhrich.

A visitation will be held from 5-7:00 P.M. on Thursday, October 25, 2018 at Immanuel Lutheran Church. Services will be held at 11:00 A.M. on Friday, October 26, 2018 at Immanuel Lutheran Church. Private burial.

The family wants to thank all the caregivers we have had over the years especially the Heart Care Clinic, First Light, the staff at North Colorado Medical Center and the staff at Greeley Medical Clinic. Memorial contributions may be made in Violet’s honor to Immanuel Lutheran Church in care of Allnutt Funeral Service, Macy Chapel, 702 13th Street, Greeley, Colorado, 80631. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.allnuttgreeley.com.

  • PALLBEARERS

  • Eric Clausen
  • MJ Crespin
  • Matt Crespin
  • Brooks Carlson
  • Blake Carlson
  • Matt Denman
  • Brandon Clum
  • Todd Anderson

Services

  • Visitation Thursday, October 25, 2018
  • Funeral Service Friday, October 26, 2018
REMEMBERING

Violet June Carlson

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Emily Clum

December 16, 2018

I was lucky enough to grow up across the ditch from Grandma and Grandpa. I loved spending time with them. I would often run across the bridge to visit or to escape from my chores or from Katie and/or Eric. Grandma would bring me along to numerous different classes and clubs along the years, whether it be sewing, painting, crochet, or getting ready for the annual church garage sale. I found that my future did not necessary include pastimes involving needles or yarn, I think grandma may have too since I was always tasked with putting on the yarn ties on the quilts instead of actually sewing them together. I did however learn a tad from the painting classes and have a few pieces now hung at my home, one that Grandma insisted on framing, she was always one of my biggest cheerleaders. Regardless of what I did or did not learn the time spent with her during those clubs and classes are memories that I will treasure forever.
I love you!!

Matt Denman

December 16, 2018

I knew Violet for over 20 years, meeting her when I was in high school when I started dating her oldest granddaughter who I married in 2005. Violet was such a kind, caring, and genuine person and I observed many instances of this over the years. She welcomed and included all those she came across, and made everyone feel like family. Violet was also the leader of the family, leading by example, being diligent, showing up early, staying after to clean up and put things where they belonged, and making sure everyone enjoyed themselves. Family came first and was the priority, and whether it was a birthday or a holiday, she enjoyed spending time with those she loved, and she seemed to always bring something sweet to share.
Violet had such an impact in raising four incredible daughters, guiding, caring for, and supporting ten grandchildren, and holding close four great-grandchildren while spoiling them and loving them dearly.
Her life continues in those she left behind through the lessons that were taught, lessons that will be in place for years, and generations, to come.
Thank you for sharing this family with me, Violet. You did well, and should be happy with the legacy of your life that continues.

Katie Denman

December 15, 2018

Tack så mycket Grandma! It is an honor to pay tribute to the woman who taught me, inspired me, showed me unconditional love and support, and gave me profound strength. To my birthday buddy, if I am only a fraction of the woman you were I will be a success. Tough as nails and sweet as pie. Skål!

Psalm 23

December 14, 2018

1 The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.

2 He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters.

3 He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name’s sake.

4 Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.

5 Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies: thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over.

6 Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: and I will dwell in the house of the Lord for ever.

God's Garden

December 14, 2018

God looked around his garden
And found and empty place.
He then looked down upon the earth,
and he saw your tired face.
He put his arms around you
And lifted you to rest.
God's garden must be beautiful,
He always takes the best.
He knew that you were suffering,
He knew that you were in pain.
He knew that you would never
Get well on Earth again.
He saw the road was getting rough,
And the hills were hard to climb.
So He closed your weary eyelids,
and whispered "Peace be thine."
It broke our hearts to lose you,
But you didn't go alone
For part of us went with you
The day God called you home.

Violet June Carlson Memorial Slideshow

December 14, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btUB4gzd3Uc&feature=youtu.be

For your viewing pleasure at any time :)

Please allow 15 minutes.

Day by Day by The Wiebes

December 14, 2018

This song translates from Swedish: "Day by Day" to English: "Dag for Dag" . This song is near and dear to the family's heart as Grandma requested Todd sing this particular song, one of her favorites!
~
Day by day, and with each passing moment,
Strength I find to meet my trials here;
Trusting in my Father’s wise bestowment,
I’ve no cause for worry or for fear.
He, whose heart is kind beyond all measure,
Gives unto each day what He deems best,
Lovingly its part of pain and pleasure,
Mingling toil with peace and rest.

Every day the Lord Himself is near me,
With a special mercy for each hour;
All my cares He fain would bear and cheer me,
He whose name is Counsellor and Pow’r.
The protection of His child and treasure
Is a charge that on Himself He laid;
“As thy days, thy strength shall be in measure,”
This the pledge to me He made.

Help me then, in every tribulation,
So to trust Thy promises, O Lord,
That I lose not faith’s sweet consolation,
Offered me within Thy holy Word.
Help me, Lord, when toil and trouble meeting,
E’er to take, as from a father’s hand,
One by one, the days, the moments fleeting,
Till with Christ the Lord I stand.

Linnea Gingerich

November 29, 2018

"Away is good but home is best" is a Swedish proverb Grandma loved and lived by.

Love, Me By: Collin Raye

November 29, 2018

(This is one of the songs that is near and dear to the family's heart.)

I read a note my grandma wrote back in 1923
Grandpa kept it in his coat, and he showed it once to me
He said, "Boy, you might not understand
But a long, long time ago
Grandma's daddy didn't like me none
But I loved your grandma so"

We had this crazy plan to meet and run away together
Get married in the first town we came to, and live forever
But nailed to the tree where we were supposed to meet instead
I found this letter, and this is what it said

If you get there before I do, don't give up on me
I'll meet you when my chores are through
I don't know how long I'll be
But I'm not gonna let you down, darling wait and see
And between now and then, 'til I see you again
I'll be loving you
Love, me

I read those words just hours before
My grandma passed away
In the doorway of a church
Where me and grandpa stopped to pray
I know I'd never seen him cry in all my fifteen years
But as he said these words to her
His eyes filled up with tears

If you get there before I do, don't give up on me
I'll meet you when my chores are through
I don't know how long I'll be
But I'm not gonna let you down, darling wait and see
And between now and then, 'til I see you again
I'll be loving you
Love, me
Between now and then, 'til I see you again
I'll be loving you
Love, me

cheryl clausen

October 31, 2018

Mom made so many good memories with friends and family over the years. We have cried and laughed this week. But the service was a tribute to who she was and meant to all. Thanks to all that helped us display her love. We will carry Mom's spirit in our hearts until we meet again!

FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY

Biography

Violet June Carlson was known as many things to many people. She was a loved one, a friend, and someone special. To family and friends who knew her best, Violet will be remembered as a very exceptional person.

       She was the daughter of Aaron V and Esther Linnea (Rapp) Benson.

      A typical teenager, Violet had a fairly happy high school experience, making that critical transition from adolescence to adulthood. She graduated from Eaton High School in 1947. She enjoyed some classes more than others, having favorite subjects and teachers.

      Violet enjoyed her college years, which may have been a challenge with all of the academics, responsibilities, and the sudden freedom that accompanied them, but Violet was able to manage the balancing act. She earned her RN, BSN from CU School of Nursing in 1951.

      On October 25, 1953 Violet exchanged wedding vows with Clarence Carlson at First Lutheran Church of Longmont, Colorado. Empathic and loyal, Violet was committed to making her new family happy.

      Violet worked hard to be a good mother to her children and she did her best to fulfill their needs. Violet was blessed with four children, four daughters, Linda Gingerich, Cheryl Clausen, Marcia Carlson, and Janet Crespin. Another blessing for Violet was the gift of ten grandchildren, Katie, Eric, Emily, Michael, Linnea, Matthew, Brooks, Kendell, Micayla, and Blake.

      Fortunately, Violet enjoyed what she did for a living. Showing a strong work ethic, Violet worked diligently and did her best to succeed in her career. Her primary occupation was a public health nurse. She was employed for over 20 years by the Weld County Health Department. Her specialty was maternity and child healthcare. She traveled to several schools and homes, where her patients and their families considered her their personal visiting angel. Violet always sought to be a team player, doing what was necessary in order to get the job done.

      Violet enjoyed her leisure time by taking part in various hobbies. Violet was an avid painter, seamstress, card player, gardener, value shopper, and cook. She enjoyed reading about and trying out new recipes as well as traveling. Violet honored and cherished her Swedish heritage and loved passing on this love to her children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Enjoyed dancing, especially at family weddings where she and Clarence were often the last ones on the dance floor. She was content to enjoy her favorite pastimes alone but was also willing to share her interests with others.

      Violet found pleasure in sports. Violet was also something of a sports fan and enjoyed following her favorite events whenever she had the chance to do so. Violet followed all the Colorado athletic professional teams, especially the Rockies. She could even tell us about the opposing team’s pitchers. She was also her children and grandchildren’s biggest cheerleader, and she and Clarence were constants in the stands of her grandchildren’s athletic and extracurricular events.

      Throughout her life, Violet was a doer and was always actively involved in professional and community organizations. Throughout her later years, Violet was an active member of Immanuel Lutheran Church, Sewing Club at Immanuel, Member and Officer of the Northern Colorado Swedish Heritage Society, Farmette Club, Country Circle, and Pinochle Club of Brighton and a 4-H leader.

      Violet’s faith was important to her. She was a member of Immanuel Lutheran Church. During that time, she was involved with the Sewing Club.

      Violet passed away on October 21, 2018 at North Colorado Medical Center in Greeley, Colorado. She is survived by her husband, Clarence Carlson, of LaSalle; sister, Shirley Uhrich; sister-in-law, Elaine Luther; four daughters and sons-in-law: Linda and Stan Gingerich, Cheryl and Bret Clausen, Marcia and Randy Carlson, and Janet and Mike Crespin; ten grandchildren: Katie (Clausen) and husband Matt Denman, Eric Clausen, Emily (Clausen) and husband Brandon Clum, Michael Crespin, Linnea Gingerich, Matthew Crespin and wife Ashley, Brooks Carlson, Kendell Carlson, Micayla Crespin, and Blake Carlson; four great-grandchildren: Austin Denman, Taylor Denman, Christopher Crespin, and Eveline Violet Clum. Services were held at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Greeley, Colorado. Violet was laid to rest in Linn Grove Cemetery in Greeley, Colorado.

      Simply stated, Violet was a good and kind person, an individual who will for all time be remembered by her family and friends as being a caring and giving person, someone who was a vital part of their lives. Violet leaves behind her a legacy of life-long friendships and many cherished memories. Everyone whose life she touched will always remember Violet June Carlson.

Memories of Grandma Vi
Katie:
Everyone get comfortable, this is long, but worth a listen, and no surprise as this is a compilation of memories from 15 grandkids and significant others. So many amazing memories that began with one boy meeting one girl.
Grandma was always boss. That was clear, and everyone knew it. But ironically with so much influence she was a selfless woman, who thought about herself last, and was forever willing to lend a hand. She was unequivocally one of the most generous people we knew. She would have given the shirt off her back to someone in need. She never yelled, but she did an “eek” sound and everyone knew she was upset, frustrated, disappointment or just flat disgusted. Or she would say “shame on you” and that was enough to make us all shape up. Or rather than talk ill of others she would say “I sure hope they behave.” She also had a reassuring way of ensuring you knew she was paying attention to you as she listened by adding an “oh..” quite frequently. We also often heard her say “I’m fine” or “we’re fine” and until her last breath she insisted on being independent.

Matt:
But I think all of us will remember her saying “Clarence…” and somehow like an angel whispering to grandpa when he couldn’t hear anyone else, he could clearly hear grandma. But there were several funny stories as both grandpa and grandma became more hard of hearing from a phone call that led them to believe grandpas next CT was at King Soopers, or the time grandma was worried about an upcoming doctor’s appointment, and only after calls to every doctor for both grandma and grandpa (which was a lot) did they identify the appointment was for the car to be serviced at Weld County Garage. And it wasn’t always a saying, that was uniquely grandmas, we will remember grandma waving and smiling at us as grandpa drove her away. She had the kind of smile that could soothe anyone’s soul.

Linnea:
Whenever you got to the farm, Grandma always insisted you have something to eat; even if you weren’t even hungry; and she even ensured you took something home with you to eat as well. There weren’t any ifs, and, or buts, about it; she wouldn’t allow you to say no. She would stock up on things like peanut butter and jelly to send home with the college kids, or fruit snacks to send home with the younger kids. But later, as the roles reversed, and we attempted to cook for her, she was never afraid to break out her inner food critic, and let us know how she really felt about the meal. She enjoyed looking at and trying new recipes, even the last of her years. Truly we learned, some of the best found ingredients were that, that came from the farm. Like when we used to take the golf cart out to cut asparagus along the ditch, and then take it home to cook it in mounds of butter and fresh mushrooms for dinner. We all also loved her homemade applesauce, with apples picked from, you guessed it, her backyard of course. And no meal or gathering was complete without a complementing adult beverage to wind down the night or celebrate the occasion. She kept a fully stocked bar at home, and was even known to hold her own; enjoying a bowling ball sized beer when out to eat with her grandkids in their mid-twenties. And to that we all say: Skål!

Blake:
Grandma loved to bake everything you can dream of, including topping off brownies, cupcakes, and cakes with homemade icing. She would coach us with amazing tips, like using tapioca flour as the best thickener. Grandma’s counters were always complete with multiple types of cookies to choose from in the cookie jar, and some type of candy. You could also count on her pantry to be stocked with multiple cake mixes. Grandma also gave us our love of pie, which is best enjoyed warmed with ice cream. We loved going to JB’s and Farmer’s with grandma because we knew if we finished our meal we would share pie ala mode or an ice cream sopaipilla! With others it would have been considered asking too much since going out to eat was a treat in-and-of-itself but with her it was a given you could look forward to with giddy throughout the meal!

Micayla:
Grandma also loved bargain shopping, and knew her way around a dollar store, or the thrift stores including a special outing on our annual family trip to Vail. She was constantly so thoughtful to pick up snacks, candy, coloring books, and gifts for special occasions including, cards she picked for each of us for every birthday. In addition to the dollar and thrift stores, grandma really had a love of Kohls. She was very particular about what “she was going to have” that would be perfect for every member of our family, and then on the occasion where we would take her shopping for items for herself, she was so picky it seemed like we would never find something acceptable. She had an eye for the type of material, how patterns were sewn together, and sought just the perfect fit. And she LOVED to accessorize all of her outfits! Her bargain hunting extended to the perfect shopping partner at many a garage sale growing up where she was very supportive of letting us find the perfect treasure to take home and cherish. Especially if it was the bi-annual church garage sale, and we attempted to be helpful! Even in her final year and failing health, she insisted on getting to the garage sale, strolling down every isle to analyze every table and item. She was just thrilled to be there! But the shopping didn’t end with her she was also known to send grandpa off to Ace to pick up the weekly sale item, not just for her but to stock up for her grandkids. She would also often ask one of our moms to “go into town for her.”

Katie:
Grandma seemed to know EVERYONE and taught us that we should as well. She was the original Facebook long before Mark Zuckerberg was even alive. She could pick up a Greeley Tribune, or Eaton Voice, and tell you stories about what seemed like most of the people featured. She also took it upon herself to point out articles we should read to stay current on the most important Weld County news. We could drive anywhere in town or go to Farmer’s and she would say hello like a rock star to every person we passed, and then continue to explain who the person was and all about their extended family. Or even just driving around town, she would direct us with every turn and speed limit, and even taught us to do the farmer wave of a few fingers when passing someone driving the other direction as we drove around the area. She would tell us who lived in every house and about their families and could do so for miles around. When we would visit grandma, she would keep us all up to date about the latest goings on for relatives, friends, neighbors, and often knew more about our friends or our friends’ parents before we did. She truly took time to get to know and care for everyone around us and taught us that everyone has a story if you take the time to learn and appreciate it, and she worked hard to ensure her kids and grandkids did the same.

Matt:
Grandpa and Grandma made an effort to attend all our ballgames. It was amazing just how far they were willing to go and surprised us all appearing in the stands ready to cheer on their favorite athlete! On occasion, they would travel in style in their luxurious motor home to the distant games. Her interest in sports extended to the professionals on TV. She could tell you all about every athlete, how they were related, how they were doing this season, about injury reports, specific final scores, or even points scored by specific players. She surprised us all as our own personal ESPN reporter, agent, and general manager all in one lovely lady with the answer to any question you might ask. The men in our family would even sheepishly admit that she often knew more about the professional athletes and what was going with each team than they did!

Linnea:
Some of our fondest memories with Grandma, were when she was sharing our Swedish heritage with us: from mid-summer dancing around the maypole wearing traditional holiday attire only after filling it with Swedish flowers, to dressing up as the star role of Santa Lucia, to learning how to count and say many common sayings and prayers in Swedish, to even hosting extended family from Sweden, to our bi-annual trips in the motor home to Lindsborg, KS to celebrate Hyllningsfest. She would tell us stories about Sweden, and how much pride everyone took in their work and homes. She often shared how, her mother, Esther always would comment on a girl that walked about around with a purse must have a “JOB”. Obliviously, the sweetish J is a tough one in in English translation. Grandma taught us what a good smorgasbord includes and gave us our love of: korv, herring, a good sampling of meatballs, cheese and crackers, dinner rolls, and even made us try Lutefisk (which is a pickled fish for those who are wondering) at Christmas just that once. EICK!

Blake:
Grandma enforced positive pressure to attend church every Sunday. We will never forget how distinctly grandma’s voice stood out singing every Sunday at church. Even from the farthest back pew, she was leading by example encouraging those around her to participate and do their best. She taught us about our Lutheran faith, she got us to Sunday school and bible school, and so much about life that begins with believing in a higher power, showing up to participate, and doing our best. In her final hours she reassured us all that she was ready to go to heaven and when that didn’t happen on her timeline she joked, “maybe He’s still deciding which way I am going,” or that “St. Peter must not work 24x7,” even though we all knew her faith was potentially the only thing stronger than her will.

Micayla:
Grandma was a nurse through and through. Her bathroom was filled with medications including those stocked up on from Mexico after trips to Arizona, and other home remedies. Almost any ailment you had, grandma could fix and then make you feel better with a homemade treat. Even when we were out and about, grandma always had sugar free candies in her purse she would give us to keep us occupied, and she always had Kleenex in her purse and pockets she could pull out before you could even gestured or announced your need. She insisted on preventive health through attendance at the annual 9News Health Fair. She also nursed several of us back to health after surgeries. She knew how to comfort each of us. And as the best nurse, grandma worked until the end of her final shift passing away at 6:59am (a traditional shift change is 7am). She inspired many of us to be the next generation of community servants, and through all of us her legacy and compassionate impact will continue.

Katie:
We will remember grandma being busy, but not stressed or frazzled. She was organized, had a plan and was executing and directing others as needed to see her plan through. She never complained, she just smiled and with sheer determination and an occasional loving directive, she went about her day. At times, some may have perceived her as bossy or stubborn, but as a working mother of four, church going, community volunteer, who also made time to participate in clubs and other extra-curricular groups, she just had to be boss. The woman was always on the go, and very often had a grandkid or two in tow.

Matt:
Even when she was at home she was busy painting in her covered porch, baking, quilting and crocheting in her blue recliner, and gardening. Thankfully for all of us, she was a masterful seamstress as well. We all took a number of clothing items to grandma to sew in a new zipper, or patch a hole, or hem a special dress or pair of pants just perfectly. Grandma was happy to teach and share these hobbies and chores with her grandkids. She would bring us along to different classes and clubs, and while some of us learned early on that our skills were best directed putting the yarn ties on the quilts instead of actually sewing, she still engaged us with hands on activities, and was our biggest cheerleader. She even insisted on framing some of our paintings over the years.

Linnea:
She was always willing to let us work at the farm for extra money. Even if it was her last dollar, she would let us work for it. This instilled a hearty work ethic in us early on, that only benefits us all in adulthood today. But chores for grandma and grandpa didn’t ever really feel like work. We loved being out on the farm: running the big equipment, taking wild adventures in the golf cart, and digging mindlessly and joyfully in the dirt. As we helped in her garden every spring, by re-organizing pots and plants, pulling weeds, raking and trimming, she would take time to explain to us what each flower was, where she got it, and how to care for it. Grandma was a generally soft-spoken woman, but a scientist of sorts, with more information on each plant than you could ever find in a botany book. She had a grand garden, complete with prize winning, hardy irises in many luscious and beautiful colors. Thankfully, while there was hard work going on around the farm, she would ensure everyone had snacks and lunches and even brought out refreshing beverages to the fellas on those John Deere tractors. She would also be the one to tell grandpa, it was time for everyone to take a break, and come in to gather for lunch. Visiting with grandma and grandpa after our chores were done, was also a stern expectation for all of us, which of course grew on us all over time, and flourished to be something we dearly looked forward to, even just as much, as the times playing mindlessly and joyfully in the dirt.

But farm life wasn’t all roses for Grandma. She absolutely HATED snakes. Some of us also share this fear. But once we caught a snake, and grandpa told grandma this, and she locked us all out of the house until we showed our hands straight up in the air to ensure 110% the snake wasn’t anywhere around. She also highly disliked mice. We good-humoredly used this to play tricks on her knowing this about her, but on one occasion we really did spot a mouse, and she shot straight up on to the high chair. Trust me, this wasn’t just an ordinary chair, it was the high chair we all grew up getting our hair cut by Aunt Marcia on. Geez, who knew she had such amazing hops! And while snakes and mice were not her thing, she loved animals, including cats and dogs. She would make us gather all the scraps from the dinner plates and take them all out to the strays.

Blake:
She also let us just be carefree kids, from collecting endless numbers of tadpoles, to playing Nintendo games in the basement. She played with us and had a mean game of ‘up/down’ that we played nightly in Vail. We all loved to drive the golf cart and 4-wheeler, some of us better than others… crazy how they never did jump the cement ditch, and how many of us got stuck in the mud or even hit the side of the shed, but grandma was there to cover for us. Once in an instant when grandma turned her back, one of us ran into the corn field and then didn’t return when grandma was frantically calling for him. Needless to say he earned new, jingle bell accessories on his shoes that day. We loved to have sleepovers with the cousins at grandma’s, even though… we’ll admit it, some of us didn’t always make it through the night before we had to call mommy and daddy to come get us.

Micayla:
Some of us were blessed to live with her on the farm. This meant grandma and grandpa’s was a refuge from fighting siblings, or to get out of doing chores. Or to catch something on cable from a movie where grandma would serve you snacks to the ballgame on that day. She took us to get our first Block Buster videos (back when that was still a thing…) and helped us pick out great movies like the Sandlot that remain some of our favorite movies still today.

Katie:
Grandma taught us the value of family and as the matriarch of the family marshalled generations to attendance at every member’s birthday, often celebrated at Farmer’s, and every major holiday. As we have expanded our family, we have learned that we also have quite a LARGE family, and while that could be overwhelming to a suiter, her warm smile welcomed everyone like they were blood. She had a way of firmly ensuring the expectation was clear that we all be there, ON TIME, no excuses, and yet we never recall her ever verbally giving any of us orders. We just knew. It is a hard to describe Carlson trait of unspoken expectations and yet they are translated and adhered to without debate because we all just knew. This included some of our less than best tween and teen moments as we protested wearing the initially handmade matching Christmas dresses often made of crushed velvet to later years of store bought matching dresses all donned at 5am for the Swedish sunrise service. Yes, we had many years of fun with the contest of ‘who wore it best.’ But on occasion there was a protest or scowl in pictures, but we all knew who won those battles… we now realize there was never any contest because when grandma put her mind to something that was the end of it, she was more determined than anyone we know which is saying a lot given the crowd here today. This also extended to ensuring we were thankful and understood the importance of both saying thank you, as well as writing thank you notes. But whether it was matching outfits for all of us to wear at Christmas, or how thoughtfully she ensured each of us received the same or equal gift, she single handedly fully stocked most of our wardrobes and brought the magic of Christmas to each of us through handmade stockings marked with our initials and overflowing with goodies. Every time we eat an orange we will forever be reminded of Christmas stockings.

Linnea:
Grandma, even in her failing health, made it a priority to see each and every one of her great-grandbabies, hours after they were each born: to hold, kiss, snuggle, and love them with all her heart. There was absolutely nothing, that would stop or stand in grandma’s way from being with her ever growing family. For example, she even insisted on checking out of the nursing home a few days early, to be present at Matty and Ashley’s wedding up in the mountains of Silverthorne. But being the nurse she was, she even had a few extra life-saving tanks of oxygen, for those in need. But she didn’t just show up, she even got in a dance or two! All of us knew, no matter what, and most of all, she was on our side and would always support us through and through, with her steady and gentle unconditional love.

Micayla:
When asked what grandma’s favorite quote or motto was, without a second thought she said the words, “hem är bäst.” These are Swedish for “home is best.” She then proceeded to say that her mother used to say those three words and for us to know, no matter where we are or happen to go, home is never far. And in the end, it was a team sport to keep grandma at home and out of the nursing home and eventually even bringing home to grandma in the hospital with all of us by her side. Tack så mycket Grandma! Our hearts are broken but filled with endless loving memories we will treasure forever. Until we meet again, we know she is in heaven keeping tabs on everyone and working to make it feel like home, so she will be ready to welcome us when our time comes.

Next we would like to have Todd sing you a song grandma requested. The remaining song in this service are close to the family's heart as we brought home to grandma, we also had our own service and sang songs including this one grandma requested Todd sing, a Swedish folklore, Day by Day.