OBITUARY

Diane Jean Barlow

October 10, 1944November 19, 2010

Diane J. Barlow 66, passed away peacefully Nov. 19, 2010 in Indianapolis. She was born in Marion Co, to the late Orin and Pauline Barlow. Diane worked in the Health Care profession most of her life. She was a member of the Whitelick Presbyterian Church, Brownsburg, In. and Honey Creek United Methodist Church. Diane was a loving mother and grandmother and had a passion for gardening and her dog Penny. She is survived by her daughter Loretta (Rob) Campbell; son Jeffrey (Belinda) DeWeese; grandchildren Zachery, Joshua, and Grace Campbell, Brittany and Cassandra DeWeese. A memorial gathering will take place Monday Nov. 22, 2010 from 3:00-5:00 PM at Honey Creek United Methodist Church 2722 S. Honey Creek Rd. Greenwood, In. 46143, followed by a memorial service at 5:00PM. Arrangements entrusted to Little & Sons Funeral Home Stop 11 Chapel. www.littleandsonsindianapolis.com

REMEMBERING

Diane Jean Barlow

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Peter Schilling

November 23, 2010

Loretta I am so sorry for your loss and God will find a special place for your mother. Remeber the good times and she will live inside of you forever! My family prayers go out to you!

Loretta Campbell

November 23, 2010

November 22, 2010
Mom’s Memorial Letter

First of all I would like to thank each of you for coming. She would be happy to know we were all here today not to mourn for her loss but to celebrate her life. So I would like to share things of mom you may not know and some of my favorite memories.

Mom grew up on a family farm and park in Brownsburg; the park was called Barlow’s Flowing Well Park and people would come on the weekends to fish; hike, ride horses and camp. She worked hard to help maintain it and the farm as my grandparents were older. We would go for long walks in our woods and she would wade in the creek with me.

She was a very good horse rider – I remember her galloping across our fields working the horses out – she would take me for rides and go so fast the tree branches would blur! It was scary but also exciting sitting behind her so high up and speeding thru the woods.

Mom owned a few motorcycles in her life. She would take me for rides and we would go on the highway and downtown to the Circle. And just like riding the horse, it was fun and scary. Sometimes people would be surprised to see the two of us riding – but she didn’t care. I think of her every time I see a girl on a bike and it cracks me up. I may have disappointed her in that I don’t like riding horses or motorcycles.

She liked the ocean, walking in the water, picking up shells and sitting in the sun. I took her to Fort Meyers and Myrtle Beach, but never got her to the Caribbean.

Mom was a very good bowler and played on a weekly bowling league.

She taught me to ice skate on the pond. One time she was using a snow shovel to clear the ice and I was skating behind her. I remember hearing the ice crack and instinctively pushed off her to give me momentum to get back to shore! She just laughed and said “Thanks a lot. Be sure to save yourself.”

She made sure I knew when a persimmon was ripe. Every fall we would make persimmon pulp and she would make me pudding for my birthday.

She taught me how to plant trees and tulips – but not how to sew.

She taught me how to plant corn, tomatoes and potatoes – but not how to cook. Rob and the kids still pay for that.

When I was 9, she brought me a white kitten, I named her Trixie; I had her for 18 years. When I moved out mom wanted weekend visitation rights. I think she missed the cat more than me.
She planned a surprise 13th birthday sleepover party with my friends and she had the most awesome annual Halloween parties in our barn.
We had water fights in the house – she would use the kitchen sink sprayer and Jeff would bring the water hose from outside! It was crazy but she said at least the kitchen floor would get clean!

She liked to color her hair red; said it was because red hair was “an attitude, not a birthright”.

She loved animals and always had a dog with her. We had raccoons living in the house and a goat in the yard. At one time, we had 27 cats/kittens on the property. She would wake before dawn to break the frozen water for the cows and horses.

She would cry if she saw a stray dog. After it rained, she was the one rescuing worms from sidewalks and tossing back in the grass. Now I find myself doing the same thing.

She taught me how to drive a car at Raceway Park. Because she worked there on weekends; I practiced on the road track and drag strip. I thought that was pretty cool.

Mom was always tired but she would take me to work at Hilligoss Bakery at 5:30am on weekends– never complained but I’m sure she was glad when I got my own car.

We never had much money to go places but our friends were always welcome to hang out, sleepover and eat whatever was in the house.

I was raised to help my neighbors – period.

After my parents divorced, she, brother and I moved back into the farm house where she grew up. I slept in her childhood room upstairs – it wasn’t heated and she felt badly about that – but I just thought it cool to have her old room. It was a sad day when the farm house burnt down.

She learned Country Line Dancing and I saw her once – she looked good on the dance floor.

Mom made the best peanut butter fudge. She would take some to an old lady living at my grandmother’s nursing home. The lady had no teeth and could barely speak – but she loved moms fudge.

She was a loyal daughter – working three jobs to pay for my grandparents nursing home care. She always said she did not want to go to a home; just take her out to the pasture and leave her. I am thankful she lived independently. My grandmother lived with us the last two weeks before she passed away and I am so glad we were able to bring mom home with us for her last few days, too.

Some mothers and daughters may shop together or go out for lunches; mom and I spent our together time at doctor’s offices and hospitals. And we usually had fun. She had been going for treatments and appointments for ten years. We would tell stories to pass the time and, even if it was the same stories, it didn’t matter. If there was laughter going on behind the curtains, it was us. More than once in a doctor’s waiting room, we would get disapproving looks from other patients and families! Many times our tears were from laughter not from sadness.

I will miss taking care of her. No more worries.

The best gift those of you who knew mom could do for me, would be to share your favorite story or memory. No matter how insignificant it may seem– if it brings a smile or memory to you, it would mean a lot to me and my children. Thank you again for coming.

Loretta Campbell

November 23, 2010

November 22, 2010
Mom’s Memorial Letter

First of all I would like to thank each of you for coming. She would be happy to know we were all here today not to mourn for her loss but to celebrate her life. So I would like to share things of mom you may not know and some of my favorite memories.

Mom grew up on a family farm and park in Brownsburg; the park was called Barlow’s Flowing Well Park and people would come on the weekends to fish; hike, ride horses and camp.

She worked hard to help maintain it and the farm as my grandparents were older. We would go for long walks in our woods and she would wade in the creek with me.

She was a very good horse rider – I remember her galloping across our fields working the horses out – she would take me for rides and go so fast the tree branches would blur! It was scary but also exciting sitting behind her so high up and speeding thru the woods.

Mom owned a few motorcycles in her life. She would take me for rides and we would go on the highway and downtown to the Circle. And just like riding the horse, it was fun and scary. Sometimes people would be surprised to see the two of us riding – but she didn’t care. I think of her every time I see a girl on a bike and it cracks me up.

I may have disappointed her in that I don’t like riding horses or motorcycles.

She liked the ocean, walking in the water, picking up shells and sitting in the sun. I took her to Fort Meyers and Myrtle Beach, but never got her to the Caribbean.

Mom was a very good bowler and played on a weekly bowling league.

She taught me to ice skate on the pond. One time she was using a snow shovel to clear the ice and I was skating behind her. I remember hearing the ice crack and instinctively pushed off her to give me momentum to get back to shore! She just laughed and said “Thanks a lot. Be sure to save yourself.”

She made sure I knew when a persimmon was ripe. Every fall we would make persimmon pulp and she would make me pudding for my birthday. I will miss that.

She taught me how to plant trees and tulips – but not how to sew.

She taught me how to plant corn, tomatoes and potatoes – but not how to cook. Rob and the kids still pay for that.

When I was 9, she brought me a white kitten, I named her Trixie; I had her for 18 years. When I moved out mom wanted weekend visitation rights. I think she missed the cat more than me.

She planned a surprise 13th birthday sleepover party with my friends and she had the most awesome annual Halloween parties in our barn.

We had water fights in the house – she would use the kitchen sink sprayer and Jeff would bring the water hose from outside! It was crazy but she said at least the kitchen floor would get clean!

She liked to color her hair red; said it was because red hair was “an attitude, not a birthright”.

She loved animals and always had a dog with her. We had raccoons living in the house and a goat in the yard. At one time, we had 27 cats/kittens on the property.

She would wake before dawn to break the frozen water for the cows and horses.

She would cry if she saw a stray dog. After it rained, she was the one rescuing worms from sidewalks and tossing back in the grass. Now I find myself doing the same thing.

She taught me how to drive a car at Raceway Park. Because she worked there on weekends; I practiced on the road track and drag strip. I thought it was pretty cool.

Mom was always tired but she would take me to work at Hilligoss Bakery at 5:30am on weekends– never complained but I’m sure she was glad when I got my own car.

We never had much money to go places but our friends were always welcome to come over, to sleep and eat whatever was in the house.

I was raised to help my neighbors – period.

After my parents divorced, she, brother and I moved back into the farm house where she grew up. I slept in her childhood room upstairs – it wasn’t heated and she felt badly about that – but I just thought it cool to have her old room. It was a sad day when the farm house burnt down.

She learned Country Line Dancing and I saw her once – she looked good on the dance floor.

Mom made the best peanut butter fudge. She would take some to an old lady living at my grandmother’s nursing home. The lady had no teeth and could barely speak – but she loved moms fudge.

She was a loyal daughter – working three jobs to pay for my grandparents nursing home care. She always said she did not want to go to a home; just take her out to the pasture and leave her. I am thankful she lived independently.

My grandmother lived with us the last two weeks before she passed away and I am so glad we were able to bring mom home with us for her last few days, too.

Some mothers and daughters may shop together or go out for lunches; mom and I spent our together time at doctor’s offices and hospitals. And we usually had fun. She had been going for treatments and appointments for ten years. We would tell stories to pass the time and, even if it was the same stories, it didn’t matter. If there was laughter going on behind the curtains, it was us. More than once in a doctor’s waiting room, we would get disapproving looks from other patients and families! Many times our tears were from laughter not from sadness.

I will miss taking care of her. No more worries.

The best gift those of you who knew mom could do for me, would be to share your favorite story or memory. No matter how insignificant it may seem– if it brings a smile or memory to you, it would mean a lot to me and my children. Thank you again for coming.

Eddie Overmann

November 22, 2010

Loretta,
My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family.

FROM THE FAMILY