OBITUARY

Dr. Yong Soo Paul Kim

October 4, 1945January 3, 2021
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Dr. Yong Soo Paul Kim, 75, passed away on January 3, 2021 at home in Las Vegas, Nevada. He was born on October 4, 1945 in Busan, South Korea to Louis Kucksang Kim and Elizabeth Myungran (Oh) Kim. He was a biostatistician that developing protocols for clinical trials at pharmaceutical companies. In his career, he was employed by different companies including Hyundai, General Foods, Dupont and Sanofi-Aventis. Yong enjoyed fishing, playing tennis, billiard, Go (baduk), and day trading. He was a member of Holy Spirit Catholic Church for 10 years. During that time, he was a devoted attendee of the weekday morning masses, a Eucharistic Minister, a Lector, and a regular minister to the sick at the local hospitals. He is survived by his wife, Sunnie; his children, Louis and Michelle; his brothers, Yong Syk and Peter Yong Woo; and his sisters, Young Sook, Jung Sook, and Myung Sook. Services were held at Holy Spirit Catholic Church in Las Vegas.

Services

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Memories

Dr. Yong Soo Paul Kim

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Lucas Tae-Shin Kwon

January 13, 2021

Looking at the photos with Paul at the West Point in May 1981,
my wife, Caritas Yang-Sook Kim, cousin of Paul and I miss him even more.

We will never forget his gentle, kind, warm heart and lovely, friendly smile forever. Paul stayed at my wife' house for sometime in his college days and when he visited Korea later, we used to have dinner together.

We wish him a good rest in the heaven!

We believe he will be kindly cared by the God in the heaven because he has been a real good Catholic with deep belief in God.

May him rest in peace eternally!

Lucas Tae-Shin Kwon

January 13, 2021

Mary Stinger

January 11, 2021

In the Spring of 1968, Yong Soo Kim made his home with our family in Chestnut Hill, PA. He was attending Temple University and pursuing three post-graduate degrees. He rented a room in our home as a student but quickly became part of our family.

Throughout his years with our large family of eight children, Yong brought much joy and taught many life-long lessons to our children. He became a big brother to our children
especially to our two eldest boys who were about to become teenagers.

To my husband, Harry and me, Yong became like a son. Our parents and other family members embraced him in the same manner. His devotion to his studies and work at Temple University presented a great example to all our children.

Yong lived with our family for ten years but he quickly became an integral part of our family, attending Sunday Mass, vacationing with us, celebrating many birthdays and holidays. His most favorite was Christmas when he often stayed up into the wee hours of Christmas morning wrapping presents with us. He believed everything must be wrapped.

We all learned to enjoy Korean food. Some of us became expert at Ping - Pong. The girls cherished lovely Korean dresses sent from Yong's sisters in Korea.

We are sad that Yong is no longer here but are most grateful that he came into our lives and remained a faithful, life-long friend to each of us.

May God now grant him eternal rest and peace at last.
Mary H. Stinger, Blue Bell, PA

Biography

Yong Soo Paul Kim was a humble man, quiet and observant in his ways. He was trustworthy and traditional in his approach to his life and in his relationships. He was tough-minded with the kind of “stick to it” attitude that earned the respect of all who knew him. He was also a man who was meticulous, carefully disciplined, and orderly in virtually everything he undertook. Realistic about life, he was always at the ready, prepared to take on responsibility.

Yong was born on October 4, 1945 in Busan, South Korea to Louis Kucksang Kim and Elizabeth Myungran (Oh) Kim. Yong was raised in Busan, South Korea with three older sisters, Young Sook, Jung Sook, and Myung Sook; two older brothers, Michael Yong Joon and Yong Syk; and one younger brother, Peter Yong Woo. He was brought up to be self-reliant, dependable, and especially loyal to his family. These were traits that would serve him well throughout his life.

As a young child, Yong was never someone who needed to be the center of attention. Yong developed a variety of interests and the things he enjoyed doing, he did well. He was always curious about the world around him and was often eager to explore it. Yong loved baseball; he organized his own little league team - complete with embroidered hats and uniforms - that played in his father's factory yard as a field. He was a Boy Scout and would later volunteer for future generations of Scouts. In his spare time, Yong liked terrorizing the neighborhood with his marble-shooting skills and winning all of the other kids' marbles in fierce competitions. Yong also vividly remembered practicing in speech competitions as a child. However, what Yong enjoyed most was simply playing and spending time with his many friends.

His teachers and even his friends generally thought of Yong as a serious person, but he managed to have a pretty good time in high school as he made that critical transition from adolescence to adulthood. He graduated from Gyung Nam High School in 1964. He was a talented baseball player (2nd baseman) and class president. Yong was a very logical person who enjoyed learning about factual information. Using his exceptional memory, he was able to learn much through observation. Yong always seemed to have a command of the facts and was able to make it seem as though he could easily master any problem that might be presented to him.

College life brought with it a new set of challenges, but Yong handled them well. He initially wanted to become a priest and pursued his education at the Jesuit Sogang University (Korea). Being a critical thinker who always remained intellectually independent, Yong was able to focus on the task at hand in order to complete his class work. He thrived on college reading assignments as he was able to retain the information in ways that impressed his classmates. He earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Business Administration in 1968. He determined the academic opportunities best aligned with his nature were in America and pursued Graduate Degrees from Temple University after accepting a full scholarship. He earned his MBA in 1972, MS in 1974, and PhD in 1977.

Always considered to be a solid friend, Yong was fortunate to have numerous acquaintances and several very close friends during his life. He was committed to his friends and valued the trust they placed in him. It was not uncommon for Yong to go beyond the call of duty for others, and friends frequently sought him out for advice on their careers, educational pursuits, and any other challenges they were facing. While growing up, some of his best friends were Mr. Young Soo Kim and Mr. Hyun Soo Nam. Later in life, he became friends with Dr. John Whisnant, Mr. Ben Palmer, Mr. Danny Chaing, and Dr. Gary Koch; their friendships were born of interests as diverse as medical science and fishing.

On October 27, 1984 Yong exchanged wedding vows with Misun "Sunnie" Kim at the Linden Hill Hotel and Racquet Club of Bethesda, Maryland. Throughout their marriage, Yong was trustworthy and dependable in the highest degree. He was a source of strength to Sunnie and his children; he loved his family wholeheartedly and nurtured unique relationships with each of them.

Yong was blessed with one son, Louis Dongmin, and one daughter, Michelle Soomie. Yong was a good parent to his children, always firm yet fair in his dealings. He strived to be a continuous source of support for his children to learn, grow, and raise their expectations for what they could accomplish; he succeeded.

Yong greatly enjoyed what he did for a living; his primary occupation was a biostatistician, developing protocols for clinical trials at pharmaceutical companies. He was a hard worker who expected the same in return from his co-workers. Yong had an exceptional talent for cutting through the noise and identifying root problems. He was an efficient worker, one who paid careful attention to detail with his rigid standards for accuracy. In his career, he was employed by different companies including Hyundai, General Foods, Dupont and Sanofi-Aventis.

Yong liked to experience things first-hand as well as learn about them. This trait carried over into his hobbies, where he was very methodical in how he organized his activities and categorized things. His favorite pursuits were playing Go (baduk), billiards, tennis, fishing, teaching people how to fish, and day trading. Yong was content to enjoy his hobbies alone but especially enjoyed teaching and sharing his happy experiences with his family and friends.

Yong was a man who was dedicated to his faith. He was a member of Holy Spirit Catholic Church for 10 years. During that time, he was a devoted attendee of the weekday morning masses, a Eucharistic Minister, a Lector, and a regular minister to the sick at the local hospitals. He was a sympathetic man, deeply comforted by his faith, and he with compassion shared his beliefs in hopes that he could offer similar comfort to others who were in pain.

A man of deep-rooted principle and belief in the greater good, Yong worked tirelessly to develop new cancer treatments, without interest in individual recognition. Yet, this selfless attitude earned Yong many accolades for his efforts and achievements. Throughout his career in the oncology field, he was recognized for his numerous contributions to the study, assessment, and advancement of cancer treatments. He was published over a dozen times and a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Yong enjoyed traveling. While Yong was a meticulous planner as a host for out-of-town visitors, he was actually quite free-spirited when it came to his own adventures. Favorite vacations included anywhere by the ocean from which he could enjoy delicious seafood. He loved the European rail system, visiting Rome and Jerusalem, cruising in Alaska, and above all, exploring the world with his wife. The last trip he took with his family was to Japan and Korea in 2019.

Yong never owned pets as an adult, but he fell in love with his daughter’s shepherd mix mutt, Commandant Boomer Kim the Dog. They were best friends for 3 years, aside from one incident in which Boomer was guarding Michelle while she slept. Yong was dismayed to realize that all of his efforts to win Boomer over with chicken and other treats were effective up to the point where Yong thought he could wake Michelle with impunity. Boomer wouldn’t stand for that. Otherwise, Boomer knew that Yong was a special part of Michelle’s life, and the better Boomer behaved the more chicken Yong would offer quite freely.

In 2008, Yong retired and relocated to Las Vegas to take advantage of the drier climate. In retirement, he found new pleasure in playing tennis, organizing and leading his community Tennis Club and Finance Committee, organizing events for the Korean War veterans’ community, and actively participating in his church hospital and Eucharistic ministries. Yong became well-known and well-respected for his organizational skills, his consideration and accommodation of diverse community members’ needs, and his unwavering commitment to support those around him.

Yong Soo Paul Kim passed away on January 3, 2021 at his Las Vegas home listening to his family recount some of the best stories of his life with his friend and spiritual advisor, Rev. Joe Annese. He died after a year-long battle with pancreatic cancer. He is survived by his wife, Sunnie; his children, Louis and Michelle; his brothers, Yong Syk and Peter Yong Woo; and his sisters, Young Sook, Jung Sook, and Myung Sook. Services were held at Holy Spirit Catholic Church in Las Vegas.

Commitment is a key word that can be used to describe the life of Yong Soo Paul Kim. He was committed to living the life of a good man who was both practical and trustworthy. He was committed to the traditional values that he upheld his entire life. He committed himself to being a hard worker who expected the same effort in return from those around him. Most of all, he was committed to those he knew and loved.