OBITUARY

Dr. Margaret Ann Newman

October 10, 1933December 18, 2018
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Dr. Margaret Ann Newman passed away on December 18, 2018 at Allen Morgan Nursing Home at the age of 85.

Margaret was born on October 10, 1933 in Memphis to parents Ivo M. and Mamie Love Newman. She was preceded in death by her parents and her brother, Donald I. Newman and is survived by her sister-in-law, Bertha Mae Newman; her niece, Donna Newman Mehr and her husband Dr. Larry Mehr; great-niece Leigh Ann Carkeet and her husband Geoff Carkeet and their daughters, Kendall and Maddie Carkeet; and two cousins, Cecile Warrington of Memphis and Dorothy Shank of Meridian, MS.

Margaret graduated from Central High School in Memphis and received a B.A. from Baylor University in Waco, TX. After college, Margaret returned to Memphis, where she worked at Grace Chemical Co. and became the primary care-giver for her mother who had Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gerig’s disease). Having learned from her mother that one can be healthy even in the face of disease, Margaret felt a call to nursing and entered nursing school at UT College of Nursing. After receiving her baccalaureate nursing degree, she entered graduate nursing studies at the University of California, San Francisco and received her master’s degree in 1964. Margaret returned to Memphis and served as UT Assistant Professor of Nursing and the UT Clinical Research Center Director of Nursing. Margaret spent the next 10 years at New York University—first in doctoral studies, receiving her PhD in 1971, and then as faculty. While at NYU, she initiated a post-doctoral summer workshop on nursing theory development and co-authored A Sourcebook of Nursing Research (1973, 1977). Dr. Newman assumed the position of Professor in charge of Graduate Studies in Nursing at Penn State in 1977, at which time she also organized an international nursing theory think tank. She introduced her theory of health as expanding consciousness in 1978 and published the earliest primer on developing nursing theory: Theory Development in Nursing (1979). In 1984, she assumed a position as nurse theorist and professor at the University of Minnesota, where she furthered the development and testing of her theory, working closely with doctoral students. In the 1980s, she served as a civilian consultant to the U.S. Surgeon General for Nursing Research. Dr. Newman retired from teaching in 1999, yet remained active for another 17 years advancing nursing theory, education, research, and practice through her presentations and publications, including her 7th book, Transforming Presence: the Difference that Nursing Makes (2008). Dr. Newman’s theory of health has been widely embraced around the world and her life will be commemorated in many countries.

In 2008, the American Academy of Nursing named Margaret a “Living Legend.” Dr. Newman was a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and was named outstanding alumnus by the University of Tennessee and New York University. The Zeta Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International has established a Margaret Newman Scholars Award to support doctoral students whose research extends Dr. Newman’s theory.

Margaret returned to Memphis in 2004 and appreciated living downtown and subsequently at Trezevant Episcopal Home, where she enjoyed her friends and being with her family. The family wishes to thank the employees at Trezevant and Allen Morgan and Debra Rucker, her caregiver, for her faithful service during the past several years.

A memorial service will be held in the Chapel of Trezevant Manor on Thursday January 10 beginning at 1 p.m., followed by a reception.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be given to the MargaretNewman Endowed Chair at the UT College of Nursing. giving.uthsc.edu/Margaret Newman

  • FAMILY

  • Bertha Mae Newman, Sister-in-law
  • Donna Newman Mehr (Dr. Larry), Niece
  • Leigh Ann Carkeet (Geoff), Great Niece
  • Kendall Carkeet, Great Great Niece
  • Maddie Carkeet, Great Great Niece
  • Cecile Warrington, Cousin
  • Dorothy Shank, Cousin
  • She was preceded in death by her parents, Ivo M. and Mamie Love Newman and her brother, Donald I. Newman.

Services

  • Memorial Service Thursday, January 10, 2019
REMEMBERING

Dr. Margaret Ann Newman

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Marcia Schulz

March 6, 2019

Feel so privileged to have attended your Scholars' Dialogue in Memphis (2009) and shared consciousness. Truly, it was a highlight in my life. You remain an inspiration to me and in my nursing practice. May you rest in peace, dear Dr. Newman.

Emiko Endo

January 9, 2019

Dear Dr. Margaret Ann Newman,

You taught us many important characteristic of humanness, human's wholeness, dignity, power within..... We learned from you that vulnerability, suffering, disease, death do not diminish any person. In keeping your assertaion in mind, we, nurses, relate to clients with caring in our nursing pracatice. We will make efforts to expand nursing practice based on Health as expanding consciousness in Japan and other countries.
We dedicate our love and respect to you.

The Non-Profit Organization Corporate in Japane:
Newman Theory/Research/Practice Society



Martha Alligood

December 27, 2018

Fond memories of Margaret from NYU, many SRS Rogerian conferences, and her visit to the College of Nursing at UT College of Nursing in Knoxville. Here work is a popular chapter in my nursing theory book. Peace and sympathy to her family at this time. Her work lives on...

Coleen Turman Bertsch

December 21, 2018

Margaret Ann was such a brilliant person and outstanding nurse. When I taught nursing theory at Widener College in PA and again at the Univ of Maryland, it was always a pleasure to say she had been my classmate. She certainly used her knowledge to further the profession. I'm glad I had the opportunity to know her. The world of caring for others is made better by her contributions.

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Biography

Dr. Margaret Ann Newman passed away on December 18, 2018 at Allen Morgan Nursing Home at the age of 85.

Margaret was born on October 10, 1933 in Memphis to parents Ivo M. and Mamie Love Newman. She was preceded in death by her parents and her brother, Donald I. Newman and is survived by her sister-in-law, Bertha Mae Newman; her niece, Donna Newman Mehr and her husband Dr. Larry Mehr; great-niece Leigh Ann Carkeet and her husband Geoff Carkeet and their daughters, Kendall and Maddie Carkeet; and two cousins, Cecile Warrington of Memphis and Dorothy Shank of Meridian, MS.

Margaret graduated from Central High School in Memphis and received a B.A. from Baylor University in Waco, TX. After college, Margaret returned to Memphis, where she worked at Grace Chemical Co. and became the primary care-giver for her mother who had Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gerig’s disease). Having learned from her mother that one can be healthy even in the face of disease, Margaret felt a call to nursing and entered nursing school at UT College of Nursing. After receiving her baccalaureate nursing degree, she entered graduate nursing studies at the University of California, San Francisco and received her master’s degree in 1964. Margaret returned to Memphis and served as UT Assistant Professor of Nursing and the UT Clinical Research Center Director of Nursing.

Margaret spent the next 10 years at New York University—first in doctoral studies, receiving her PhD in 1971, and then as faculty. While at NYU, she initiated a post-doctoral summer workshop on nursing theory development and co-authored A Sourcebook of Nursing Research (1973, 1977). Dr. Newman assumed the position of Professor in charge of Graduate Studies in Nursing at Penn State in 1977, at which time she also organized an international nursing theory think tank. She introduced her theory of health as expanding consciousness in 1978 and published the earliest primer on developing nursing theory: Theory Development in Nursing (1979). In 1984, she assumed a position as nurse theorist and professor at the University of Minnesota, where she furthered the development and testing of her theory, working closely with doctoral students. In the 1980s, she served as a civilian consultant to the U.S. Surgeon General for Nursing Research. Dr. Newman retired from teaching in 1999, yet remained active for another 17 years advancing nursing theory, education, research, and practice through her presentations and publications, including her 7th book, Transforming Presence: the Difference that Nursing Makes (2008). Dr. Newman’s theory of health has been widely embraced around the world and her life will be commemorated in many countries.

In 2008, the American Academy of Nursing named Margaret a “Living Legend.” Dr. Newman was a Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and was named outstanding alumnus by the University of Tennessee and New York University. The Zeta Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International has established a Margaret Newman Scholars Award to support doctoral students whose research extends Dr. Newman’s theory.

Margaret returned to Memphis in 2004 and appreciated living downtown and subsequently at Trezevant Episcopal Home, where she enjoyed her friends and being with her family. The family wishes to thank the employees at Trezevant and Allen Morgan and Debra Rucker, her caregiver, for her faithful service during the past several years.

A memorial service will be held in the Chapel of Trezevant Manor on Thursday January 10 beginning at 1 p.m., followed by a reception.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be given to the MargaretNewman Endowed Chair at the UT College of Nursing. giving.uthsc.edu/Margaret Newman