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Zoeller Funeral Home

615 Landa, New Braunfels, TX

OBITUARY

George Anthony Ellis

January 5, 1947May 28, 2019
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George Anthony Ellis Born January 5, 1947, to Jessie & John Ellis, in Seven Oaks, Kent, England, who have preceded him in death. George is survived by: his wife, Doris Johnson Hitchcock Ellis; his 3 step-children Matt Hitchcock and his wife Debra; Mark Hitchcock and his wife Gloria; Holly Friesenhahn and her husband Robert; his 5 grandchildren Matthew Hitchcock, Morgan Hitchcock and his wife Amber, and Jordan Hitchcock; and Ann Marie and William Friesenhahn; and his sister Lucy Ellis Casey and her husband Greg. He is also survived by many cousins and friends in England and Texas. George was loved by all who knew him. George went through boarding school from age 7 to 17 at Ashdown House and Winchester College (equivalent to high school), in the south of England, then to Kings College, Cambridge, for a Masters Degree in Civil Engineering. During his teens he took gliding lessons which helped him when he joined the Royal Air Force (RAF) after university. He was 21 when he joined the RAF. He always said he joined the air force to fly fast planes, so after 13 years in the cockpit of a Lightning fighter, and other planes he figured his next promotion would likely be a desk job, so he resigned his commission with the rank of Flight Lieutenant. Before he left the RAF he was given training as a test pilot, so after leaving the air force in 1980, he went to work for British Aerospace as a test pilot. He worked for them for about 15 years, then another 2 years as test pilot in Wichita, Kansas for Raytheon Aircraft Co. Worried about his elderly folks back in England, he left Kansas for England and flew free-lance for 2 years before going to work for easyJet, a low-cost airline in England, as Captain. He retired from easyJet in 2007. George met his wife, Doris, in early 1986 while he was in San Antonio working on a joint venture project for his company British Aerospace with an American aircraft company. Since his air force days he had been flying old planes from Shuttleworth Museum in Old Warden Village near Biggleswade, Bedfordshire, England, in air shows every spring and summer. After retiring from easyJet he continued to fly the old planes until 2009. He was 62. In retirement he took over the cooking at home and joined a bicycle club. He loved to cook and he loved his bicycle and his new friends in the club. He rode every day that the sun shined and twice a week with his club. Most years he went to France with some of the members for a week or two to ride the French country side. Finally in 2015 they immigrated to the USA (Texas) so Doris could spend her last years close to her children and grandchildren. It took quite a number of months to apply and receive his Green Card which is the 'permission to live' in the USA. His plan was to wait the required 3 years and apply to become a citizen. Just as he was about to be awarded his Green Card he was diagnosed with Prostate Cancer and stunned to find he was already Stage 4. He decided it would be less complicated to remain in England for the chemotherapy treatments and go to Texas afterward. So in October 2017 George finally was able to move/or immigrate, to Texas. He lived with Doris in New Braunfels for the last years of his life and was able to live a reasonable retired life and ride his bicycle with his cancer right up to the point the cancer made riding impossible. He always said it was less painful to pedal than to walk. He died on May 28, 2019 at his home in New Braunfels, Texas.

Services

  • Memorial Service Sunday, June 9, 2019

Memories

George Anthony Ellis

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Gregory Casey

June 13, 2019

Lucy knew George longer than anyone on here , so has asked me to share this picture! (apologies from me its a quick pic of a pic)

Tricia Coles

June 11, 2019

My memories of George make me smile..............
He was a real English Gentleman, always polite with a gentle nature.
His dry sense of humour often accompanied by a wiggle of his eyebrows and a twinkle in his eyes.
The lunches he cooked on my many visits to Bramhall to see both him and Doris. This even extended to almost instant freshly baked scones for afternoon tea.
His hospitality on my second visit to Texas when he cooked lunch almost every day of my 3 week visit, after his long morning bike rides.
I will miss you George and always be grateful to have had you in my life over the last 20 years, not only for yourself but for bringing my now dearest friend Doris to me. Until we all meet again.
God Bless.
Tricia


Holly Friesenhahn

June 10, 2019

Lucy Casey

June 8, 2019

My brother had wanted to fly since he was a small boy; mum told me how as a toddler he would point to the sky at the sound of a plane overhead and announce ‘George fly aeroplane’.
Through the air cadets he got the chance to learn, and as a teenager he flew Tiger Moths at Biggin Hill, not far from where we lived.
Many years later George made the day for the two small sons of my friends. As part of his job with British Aerospace he took the last airworthy Mosquito to air shows and one of these was at Greenham Common, near where my husband Greg and I lived. George advised us to stand on a hill near a mast south of Newbury to see the aircraft coming in, so we climbed up with my friend and her boys. Out of the clouds came the Mosquito and as it approached, George waggled its wings for us. The boys were over the moon.
Later that night I phoned George to thank him. ‘Waggle my wings? There I was in a wooden plane with no radar and a map on my knee, I was flying in cloud and I was trying to avoid the aerial mast!’
It wasn’t true, of course, as he later admitted.
My brother was witty, but I never heard him say an unkind word.

Shirley Mohler

June 6, 2019

George & Doris were my next-door neighbors. They came to meet us the day after the movers left us-with a welcome gift. They were leaving for one of their England stays. I was always glad to see them come back to Texas. When I’d go to their house, George always offered me a cup of tea! George was a wonderful cook, and I loved trying the English dishes he made for company.
Most of all I loved George’s stories. Most of the time he knew of a book on (whatever) topic. If not he’d quickly Google the subject. He never quit learning, caring, and smiling! I’ll miss George. He was special.

Tim Miller

June 5, 2019


George at RAE Bedford, 1977
George was pilot on one of the earliest military tests to fly a Harrier from the experimental adjustable-slope takeoff ramp at RAE Bedford. Each takeoff run was calculated for the conditions (wind, temperature, altitude, aircraft weight) and the aircraft carefully placed at the required distance from the ramp. The further back the start point, the faster the Harrier hit the ski-jump. Test data was used to design the optimum ramp angle and provide the Navy pilots with their operating performance figures.
After the Hawker team had left the RAE with their instructions on how it was done, the very first takeoff resulted in a damaged nose wheel, folded back on itself. George was faced with an unplanned configuration and no information on how to land it. The Harrier did not carry much fuel for these tests, so there was not much time to put a plan together. A normal landing from the hover would have risked unknown effects as the nose dropped and the thrust vector tilted. A plan was devised to hover the aircraft with the nozzles in the braking stop (slightly forward of the vertical) so that the nose was already inclined downwards before landing. Then George took the aircraft to a landing grid designed to keep the jet efflux away from the engine intakes, and neatly touched down at exactly the right angle to match what was left of the undercarriage. All this happened right outside the pilots’ crew-room window where we were able to watch the performance from about 50 yards away.
Why did the nose wheel fail? Turned out the company measured their takeoff distances from the top of the ramp but this take off was set up using their figures but with the distance measured from the start of the ramp! There are no stupid questions until you don’t ask.

Bill Vavra

June 5, 2019

I had the privilege of flying with George and getting to know both he and Doris in 1995 when Raytheon Aircraft sent me to England to help finish certification flight tests on the Hawker Model 800XP. I continued to fly with George when he came to Kansas until his return to England to be with his parents. George was a true gentlemen and I will always value his friendship and the knowledge he passed along to me. Rest in Peace my friend.

Gregory Casey

June 4, 2019

George doing what he loved

FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY

George and Doris - 80th birthday

FROM THE FAMILY

George and Doris in Switzerland

FROM THE FAMILY

George and Phil Johnson

FROM THE FAMILY

George and some of the girls at Doris' 75th

FROM THE FAMILY

George at the 4th of July parade

FROM THE FAMILY

George in Europe on trip reading map of the city

FROM THE FAMILY

George showing Doris how to cut her cake

FROM THE FAMILY

Biography

Born January 5, 1947, to Jessie & John Ellis, in Seven Oaks, Kent, England, who have preceded him in death. George is survived by: his wife, Doris Johnson Hitchcock Ellis; his 3 step-children Matt Hitchcock and his wife Debra; Mark Hitchcock and his wife Gloria; Holly Friesenhahn and her husband Robert; his 5 grandchildren Matthew Hitchcock, Morgan Hitchcock and his wife Amber, and Jordan Hitchcock; and Ann Marie and William Friesenhahn; and his sister Lucy Ellis Casey and her husband Greg. He is also survived by many cousins and friends in England and Texas. George was loved by all who knew him. George went through boarding school from age 7 to 17 at Ashdown House and Winchester College (equivalent to high school), in the south of England, then to Kings College, Cambridge, for a Masters Degree in Civil Engineering. During his teens he took gliding lessons which helped him when he joined the Royal Air Force (RAF) after university. He was 21 when he joined the RAF. He always said he joined the air force to fly fast planes, so after 13 years in the cockpit of a Lightning fighter, and other planes he figured his next promotion would likely be a desk job, so he resigned his commission with the rank of Flight Lieutenant. Before he left the RAF he was given training as a test pilot, so after leaving the air force in 1980, he went to work for British Aerospace as a test pilot. He worked for them for about 15 years, then another 2 years as test pilot in Wichita, Kansas for Raytheon Aircraft Co. Worried about his elderly folks back in England, he left Kansas for England and flew free-lance for 2 years before going to work for easyJet, a low-cost airline in England, as Captain. He retired from easyJet in 2007. George met his wife, Doris, in early 1986 while he was in San Antonio working on a joint venture project for his company British Aerospace with an American aircraft company. Since his air force days he had been flying old planes from Shuttleworth Museum in Old Warden Village near Biggleswade, Bedfordshire, England, in air shows every spring and summer. After retiring from easyJet he continued to fly the old planes until 2009. He was 62. In retirement he took over the cooking at home and joined a bicycle club. He loved to cook and he loved his bicycle and his new friends in the club. He rode every day that the sun shined and twice a week with his club. Most years he went to France with some of the members for a week or two to ride the French country side. Finally in 2015 they immigrated to the USA (Texas) so Doris could spend her last years close to her children and grandchildren. It took quite a number of months to apply and receive his Green Card which is the 'permission to live' in the USA. His plan was to wait the required 3 years and
apply to become a citizen. Just as he was about to be awarded his Green Card he was diagnosed with Prostate Cancer and stunned to find he was already Stage 4. He decided it would be less complicated to remain in England for the chemotherapy treatments and go to Texas afterward. So in October 2017 George finally was able to move/or immigrate, to Texas. He lived with Doris in New Braunfels for the last years of his life and was able to live a reasonable retired life and ride his bicycle with his cancer right up to the point the cancer made riding impossible. He always said it was less painful to pedal than to walk. He died on May 28, 2019 at his home in New Braunfels, Texas.