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OBITUARY

Harry Himelblau Jr.

January 4, 1928January 7, 2020
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Harry Himelblau Jr.

WORK OBJECTIVE Obtain employment which utilizes my technical knowledge and variety of work experience in tructuraJ dynamics and aeroacou tics to support the goals of my employer. EDUCATION BSME, lllinois In titute of Technology, plus courses in aeroelasticity, acoustics, static and dynamic stability of structures, shell vibration, random data analysis, earthquake engineering, modal analysislte t correlation, and product reliability, mainly at UCLA. RECENT EXPERIENCE Jet Propulsion Laboratory 1986-Present Provided dynamic upport on Cassini, Galileo, Mar Pathfinder, NSCA T, Mars Observer, and other JPL spacecraft and instruments. Performed special NASA and Air Force studies. Casini Spacecraft (Saturn orbiter to be launched on Titan IV/Centaur). Cas ini upport included the exten ive editing and evaluation of prior Titan IV flight acoustic data, and the election and operation of Cas ini dynamic flight instrumentation. Galileo Spacecraft (Jupiter orbiter launched on ShuttJe/IUS). Galileo support comprised mainly of a nuclear hazard as essment of a potential Challenger-type Shuttle disaster on the structural integrity of the Plutonium-fueled Radioi otope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Directed penetration test of explosively-driven SRB segments through Orbiter structure to determine fragment velocity attenuation at RTG locations. Guidelines for Dynamic Environmental Criteria. With NASA funding, currently leading a task team to complete a detailed 300- page ummary on the development of dynamic design and test criteria. In addition, recently completed a pyroshock test criteria standard, which include a comprehensive review of problem associated with test performance, as well as the prediction, measurement, analysis and simulation of pyroshock environments. Performed a breakthrough 3-D vs I-D random vibration te 1 comparison. Handbook of Dynamic Data Acqui ition and Analysis. With Air Force funding, led a task team and co-authored a 350-page document on nearly all aspects of this field. Under Congressional pressure, the Air Force relinquished its right to publication, leaving JPL to select the Institute of Environmental Science to publish the document as a recommended practice. Team members have sub equentIy pre ented everal tutorial cour es u ing the handbook. PRIOR EXPERIENCE Rockwell International (now Boeing), Space Systems Group Space Shuttle Program. Made significant contributions to Rockwell's winning proposal. Suggested use of off-site facilities to reduce contractor costs, e.g., NASA/NSFC for scale model rocket engine acoustic tests and NASA/JSC for Orbiter structure vibroacoustic tests. Derived fir t generation aeroacoustic and internal vibration environments for Orbiter structure and equipment using Apollo, Saturn and Titan flight data. Participated in wind tunnel testing at NASA/ Ames to further define aerodynamic noise. Prepared many briefings. After contract award, participated in selection of large Orbiter vibroacoustic test specimens. Then concentrated on the Orbiter's critical Thermal Protection Subsystem (TPS). Proposed TPS fatigue tests. Originated and acted as test director of multi-environmental testing of Orbiter structureffPS configuration at NASA/Langley. Environments comprised rain, liftoff acoustics/inplane (IP) static load, transonic/qmax acoustic/IP and differential pressure (ΔP) static loads, ascent heating/vacuum, on-orbit cold/vacuum, entry heating/vacuum profile, TAEM acoustics/IP and ΔP, and landing static load. After loss of TPS tiles during first Orbiter delivery, supported studies by NASA/Langley and special TPS "Tiger" Team to improve TPS structural integrity. Following discovery of the Palmdale "bulge", reviewed Orbiter assembly tooling/GSE for seismic resistance. Specified structural modifications. Wrote GSE seismic criteria and reviewed NASA/KSC GSE and certain facilities used for Shuttle launches from VAFB (subsequently canceled after Challenger diaster). Supported evaluation of earthquake faults in the vicinity of launch site, the utilization of probabilistic risk assessment techniques for Shuttle prelaunch exposure, the effects of soil-structure interaction on Shuttle response, and the selection of eismological and earthquake engineering contractors. Performed flow-induced vibration analyses for a wide variety of feedline bellows and flexhoses, and directed flow tests.

B-1 Program. While on part-time loan, participated in wind tunnel definition of weapons bay aerodynamic noise and election of spoiler configurations to attenuate cavity resonances for the tandem multi-bay array. Coherence data processing was used to identify flow-induced resonance characteristics.

Saturn V S-II Stage. Revised vibration criteria based on S-IV and S-II flight data. Supported S-II component vibration tests, especially large, complex feedlines. Performed special studies related to S-II POGO resolution. Wrote a landmark assessment on vibroacoustic response prediction, analysis and testing.

Apollo Command/Service Module. Supervised dynarnicists who predicted Apollo shock and vibration environments, established general and detailed design and test criteria, analyzed ground test and flight data, consulted with designers and system engineers, monitored vendor analyses and tests, coordinated with stress, reliability, associate contractor and customer representatives. Performed a variety of specialized dynamic studies, including comparison of vibration respon e due to acou tic and aerodynamic noise, and prediction of pyroshock transmission.

Northrop Electronics (now Lockheed-Martin) Predicted and mea ured dynamic environments on Skybolt stellar-inertial guidance system. Consulted with designers regarding effects on system performance. De igned a pallet to protect guidance equipment from severe vibration of a rocket-propelled sled, elected led-borne instrumentation, supervised data reduction, and determined sy tern suitability to withstand the missile flight environment. Re earch on non-Gaussian distributions and collision of nearby oscillators. Made tructural impedance measurements on Snark missile. Prepared design and te t criteria for Ranger spacecraft.

Bolt Beranek and Newman (now GTE) Reviewed equipment vibration requirements for surface-launched Titan I and predicted silo-launched Titan II environments. Supported measurements of acoustic and hydrodynamic pressure fields for silo-launched Minuteman. Performed various small research studies, including design problems in high intensity acoustic facilities.

North American Aviation (now Boeing) Performed laboratory vibration tests of aircraft equipment and structures. Consulted with design groups on gun blast, equipment protection, flutter damping, landing gear brake chatter, dynamic criteria and instrumentation, mostly on F-86 and F-l 00 aircraft. Protected fragile Navaho guidance equipment from transportation and handling shock and vibration.

Armour Research Foundation (now IITRI) Elimination of automobile brake chatter, the cau e of which was determined from laboratory and road test data analy is. Various potential solutions were road tested. Studied vibration from large slow-speed single-cylinder steam engines. Recommended ten different methods of attenuation. Field inspector and site representative for test structures (over 75) and instrumentation (650 sensors, 400 cbannels) at the 1953 Nevada nuclear test (Knothole). Measured propeller-induced vibration of a Great Lakes ore carrier.

US Naval Engineering Experiment Station (now NSRDC) Reduced machinery vibration transmission, mainly by selection and positioning of re ilient mounts. Theoretical predictions were checked by submarine tests. Determined equipment response to high impact shock tests. Practical methods of attenuating structurebome noise were evaluated, e.g., machinery part redesign, and application of damping materials. TECHNICAL SOCIETIES AND AWARDS

Acoustical Society of America, Fellow. (Former member, Technical Committee on Structural Acoustics) (Former Chairman, LA Chapter)

Institute of Environmental Sciences, Fellow. (Recipient, Irwin Vigne Memorial Award) (Recipient. two Maurice Simp on Best Paper Awards) (Certificates of Appreciation)

SAE Committee G-5 on Aerospace Shock and Vibration, Vice-Chairman. (Certificate of Appreciation, SAE Technical Board) TEACHING University of California at Los Angeles Instructor, "Fundamentals and Applications of Structural Dynamics and Aeroacou tics", three quarters, offered biannually.

Pennsylvania State University Lecturer on fatigue and crack propagation, and plate and shell vibration, "Vibration Control Seminar". Technical Papers Authored or Co-Authored by Harry Himelblau 1. "Isolating the Noise and Vibration of Rotating Machines", Product Engrg, June 1952. 2. "Effects of Resilient Foundation on Vibration Isolation", Product Engrg, Nov. 1952. 3. "Fundamentals of Guided Missile Packaging", DOD Doc. RD 219/3, three sections, July 1955. 4. "How to Perform a Vibration Analysis", Machine Design, Dec. 1955. 5. "Analytical Method for Designing Dynamic Vibration Absorbers", Machine Design, Sept. 20, 1956. 6. "A Comparison of Periodic and Random Vibration Problems", Proc. 3rd Nat. Flight Test Instrumentation Symp., Instr. Soc. Amer., May I, 1957. 7. "A Statistical Method for Determining Vibration Damage to Airborne Equipment", SAE Paper 195A, Oct. 1957. 8. "Equipment Rigid-Body Properties for Providing Vibration Protection", SAE Paper 195B, Oct. 1957. 9. "Optimum Selection of Reed Gage Natural Frequencies", SAE Paper 195C, Oct. 1957. 10. "A Reliable Approach to Protecting Fragile Equipment from Aircraft Vibration", SAE Comm. G-5 Doc. 67, Oct. 1957 (AI 0 NAA Rep. NA-56-J030). 11. "Random Vibration Nomograph", Noise Control, July 1959. 12. "Space Requirements for Simple Mechanical Systems Excited by Random Vibration", 1. Acoust. Soc. Amer., Jan. 1960. 13. "Vibration of a Resiliently Supported Rigid Body", Shock and Vibration Handbook, Ch. 3, McGraw-Hill, 4th Ed., 1994. 14. "Universal Random Vibration Nomograph", Noise Control, Sept. 1961. 15. "Measurement of Mechanical Admittance or Impedance", Design of Vibration Isolation Systems, App, 3.7, SAE Doc. AE-3. 1962. 16. "On the Quantitative Description of Non-Gaussian Random Signals", 1. Acoust. Soc. Amer., May 1962. 17. "The Response of Nonlinear Systems to Random Excitation", 1. Acoust. Soc. Amer .. Nov. 1962. 18. "Comparison of Predicted and Measured Vibration Environments for Skybolt Guidance Equipment", Shock and Vibration Bull., No. 33, Pt III, Mar. 1964. 19. "Graphical Method of Calculating rms Values for Shaped Random Vibration Spectra", Shock and Vibration Bull., No. 33, Pt 2, Dec. 1964. 20. "Use of Abbreviated Serie to Describe Non-Gau sian Random Signals", 1. Acoust. Soc. Amer., June 1965. 21. "Desired Telemetry System Characteristics for Shock, Vibration and Acoustic Measurements", Proc. 2nd Internat. Telemetry Conf., Oct. 1966. 22. "Mechanical Shock of Honeycomb Structure from Pyrotechnic Separation", Shock and Vibration Bull., No. 37, Pt IV, Jan. 1968. 23. "Assessment of Space Vehicle Aeroacoustically-Induced Vibration Prediction, Design, Analysis and Testing", NASA CR-1596, July 1970. 24. "Aeroacoustic, Vibration and Shock Environments for the Space Shuttle Orbiter", UCLA Structures Seminar, Oct. 1971. 25. "An Interim Report on Shuttle Orbiter Vibroacoustics", Shock and Vibration Bull., No. 47, Pt 3, Sept. 1977. 26. "The Shuttle Orbiter DI-19 Multi-Environmental Test Program", J. Acoust. Soc. Amer., Dec. 1981. 27. "Evaluation of a Procedure for the Analysis of Nonstationary Vibroacoustic Data", J. Inst. Envir. Sc., Vol. xxxn, No.2, pp 35-42, Mar./Apr. 1989 (Simpson Award winner). 28. "Development of Cassini Acoustic Critera Using Titan IV Flight Data", Proc. 38th ATM, Inst. Envir. Sc., Vol, 2, pp 307-331, May 1992. 29. "Summary of Guidelines for Dynamic Data Acquisition and Analysis", Proc. 64th Shock and Vibration Symp., Vol. I, pp 121-132, Oct. 1993. 30. "Summary of Cassini Acoustic Critera Using Titan IV Flight Data", 1. Inst. Envir. Sc., Vol. XXXVI, No.5, cover and pp 19-27, Sept./Oct. 1993. 31. "Handbook for Dynamic Data Acquisition and Analysis", lnst. Envir. Sc. Doc. IES-RP- DTE012.1, 350 pp, Mar. 1994 (received Vigness Award). 32. "A Procedure for Editing Flight Dynamic Data Using a Combination of Digital Processing and Manual Removal of Electrical Noise Spikes", Proc. 65th Shock and Yibration Symp., Vol. I, Nov. 1994. 33. "Effects of Triaxial and Uniaxial Random Excitation on the Vibration Response and Fatigue Damage of Typical Aerospace Hardware", Proc. 66th Shock and Vibration Symp., Vol. I, pp 15-32, Oct.lNov. 1995. 34. "Development of Acoustic Test Critera for the Ca sini Spacecraft", Proc. 41 st ATM, Inst. Envir. Sc., pp 266-285, May 1996 (Simpson Award winner). 35. "The Proposed NASA Pyroshock Test Criteria Standard", Proc. 67th Shock and Vibration Symp., Vol. 1, pp 243-262, Nov. 1996.

  • FAMILY

  • Anne Marie Calhoun, Daughter
  • Jon Himelblau, Son
  • Jackie Kaufman, Daughter

Services

  • Visitation Thursday, January 16, 2020
  • Memorial Service Sunday, January 19, 2020
  • Inurnment Sunday, January 19, 2020
  • Celebration of Life Sunday, January 19, 2020

Memories

Harry Himelblau Jr.

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Bill Hughes

January 14, 2020

Harry was a wonderful friend. As a NASA employee, I was fortunate to know and work with Harry for 30 years. Harry was a great person to work with, a structural dynamics engineering expert, and a walking history book of the aerospace industry. I appreciate all that Harry did to welcome and assist me during my own career, as well as his overall contributions to NASA. The technical guidance given and the numerous impacts made by Harry to the vibro-acoustic world will continued to be utilized by the aerospace community for many years to come. He is missed both personally and professionally.

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