OBITUARY

Alice Oholendt

November 8, 1917April 20, 2021

Alice Louise Ringer Oholendt died peacefully on Tuesday, April 20. She was 103 years old. Alice was born in Boulder, CO on November 8, 1917. She moved to North Little Rock as a young child and remained a resident most of her life. In her lifetime, she survived the Spanish Flu pandemic as an infant and the Covid19 pandemic as a centenarian.

The third child of Georgia Grove Ringer and Robert Ringer, Sr., Alice played harmonica on local radio and went on to win school awards in recitation and choral music. She graduated North Little Rock High with the mid-term class of January 1936. In 1940 she married Francis E. Oholendt; the couple were married 56 years before his death in 1996.

Alice loved the arts and served as director of the North Little Rock Women’s Club Art Exhibit and worked as a volunteer at the Arkansas Art Center. She volunteered at her church and local schools, taught Sunday school, and put in many years as a member of the Memorial Hospital Auxiliary. Skilled in knitting, crocheting, embroidery, and needlepoint, she could also sew clothing, costumes. curtains, and slipcovers. Painting ceramics, playing piano, gardening, and refinishing furniture were among her other pastimes. She was a knowledgeable collector of antique glass and an avid reader.

Her husband’s work took them to Pine Bluff, AR from 1950 - 1953 and to Ft. Worth,TX from 1973 - 1987, but when he retired the couple returned to North Little Rock and built the house where she lived until her passing.

She is preceded in death by her parents and her husband as well as by her sisters, Mildred Ringer Shillcutt and Faye Ringer Jackson and brother, Robert Ringer, Jr. She is survived by her son, Grove Oholendt of Charlevoix, MI and daughter, Rebecca Oholendt Brinkley (Carl) of Seattle, WA. Alice also leaves behind five grandchildren; Kelley Oholendt Hutchens, Michael Oholendt, Benjamin Brinkley, Claire Brinkley Noonan, Weston Brinkley, and ten great-grand children as well as many loving nieces and nephews.

A graveside service will be held at Edgewood Cemetery Monday, April 26 at 1:00pm. Mrs. Oholendt’s niece, Billie Oholendt Dreher, will officiate.

Services

No public services are scheduled at this time. Receive a notification when services are updated.

Memories

Alice Oholendt

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Lee Moore

April 25, 2021

Dear Grove, Becky and family,

As a life-long friend of Grove and all we have shared over these many years I send heart felt sorrow at the loss of your dear Mother. My memories of Alice are from 60 years ago or more as she drove carpool when none of us had a car in high school. She was funny and witty and in later years always made me feel like she was happy to see me. I thank God for her wonderful long life, her precious son and daughter and all those lovely grand-children AND great-grandchildren. There are few people one really remembers from their youth, but Alice was one of those rare people who blessed my life and I have never forgotten. Particularly, she blessed me with one of my life’s dearest friends, Grove, the kind of friendship that is always current even after long periods of time out of touch, a truly lasting gift . The love of a wonderful friend and the love of a mother are the riches in life.
In love and sympathy,
Lee Moore

Lynda Englehart

April 24, 2021

Alice and my mother, who is Gail Shillcutt Ervin, were both friends and family. Me too, thank goodness, and my daughter, Jaclyn, and her daughter, Helen. Alice gave us her precious time. She had uniqueness, great insight, and understanding. Alice had faith.
She decorated her house for the holiday seasons. She wanted photos taken every year in her yard standing beside a giant painted Easter bunny that was surrounded by daffodils.
We watched movies on Tuesday nights. We celebrated Derby Days with good advice, hats, corned beef, crushed ice, lucky glasses, and mint.
Alice was light-hearted and fun. She liked reminiscing. She would say, ¨I should write a book.¨
Mildred was the studious one, Faye was the party girl, Robert was the baby, and they just let me grow. When Grove went to Woodrow Wilson Elem., he walked home for lunch and stopped at Melrose Grocery for whatever he wanted that day. One day, he bought a whole chicken.
She said, Dr. Fulton told Grove one time that his hair was just as red as his. During WWII, when there was rationing, Alice shopped for shoes on her lunch hour, picked a shoe out from a bin that was her size and another girl had a firm hold on the other shoe of that same pair. She didn´t say who got them. Alice worked at McKesson´s then, and remembered seeing a co-worker carried out in an iron lung.
There were many of her close friends she talked about. Conventions and entertaining. There was cajoling of customers, and dancing, and a steak that was far too rare. She drew a Razorback hog on a dollar bill she lost in a bet, and years later won the same dollar back. They poured that one woman onto the plane after one too many mixed drinks of a version of a Scarlett O´Hara called a Rhett Butler. That reminds me, she said, when Gone with the Wind was first released, my grandmother, who had a young and engaging family then, locked herself in the bathroom and stayed up all night to read it cover to cover.

Becky Hight

April 24, 2021

I was so surprised to see your mom’s obituary in this morning’s online ArkDemo/Gazette.. Mrs Oholendt was the elderly lady that I hope to be. ( I’m getting closer to elderly by the minute.) I remember spending the night, exploring Cherry Hill, and eating breakfast in that kitchen on D Street. My prayers go out to your family.

Noelle Means Brannon

April 21, 2021

Remembering Alice brings to mind the entire Oholendt family. Dutch and Alice, Grove and Becky. The Oholendt’s lived 4 blocks away on West D. How cool to have a friend my age-Becky. My brother, Jay, and Grove remained close until Jay’s death. Alice’s basic wittiness tickled Mama and Daddy loved Dutch and the whole family.
Spending the night with Becky under the picnic table in their backyard with sheets draped to make a mysterious tent, lit only by a candle with a chimney. Jay and Grove took turns telling us ghost stories with whoever was outside making weird howls and noises until we scurried into Alice with big eyes, out of breath. She’d good-naturedly suggest we continue our evening in Becky’s room. After rescuing the candle, we’d enter to hear Dutch, covered by his newspaper, folding/rattling it to cover his laughter.

If Alice became perturbed at all, she’d apologize that Jay and I couldn’t stay for dinner that night, as Dutch was having ( cold) cheese sandwiches. He’d groan.

My last visit with Alice was after Easter of 2004. After my Mom’s death and visitation, Alice took me aside at her home where Jay spent a few days with Grove, and showed me the house and the study where “Dutch had loved to read his paper.” She had many years there alone and handled it with her basic aplomb. I admired that. She was funny and real and concentrated on the other person in conversation. There are fewer of those basic sweethearts left. I will miss Alice and the stories she adopted from Grandmother Ringer who referred to one’s backside as their BTU. (Becky would lean over and whisper, “ British Thermal Unit!”) So Alice came by her humor honestly!
In memory of Alice...with love, Noelle Means Brannon

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