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Cook-Walden/Capital Parks Funeral Home & Cemetery

14501 North Ih-35, Pflugerville, TX

OBITUARY

Ronald "Ronnie" Kenneth Corbin

February 9, 1940November 29, 2019
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Ronald Kenneth Corbin, 79, passed away on November 29, 2019, in Temple, Texas. He was born to Charley Carl Corbin and Odetta Mabel Rose Corbin at his family home in Zalma, Missouri on February 9, 1940. Ronnie attended High School in Miama, Oklahoma, and moved to Midland, Texas his senior year where he graduated from Midland High School. Following graduation, he enlisted in the United States Air Force. While on active duty he was stationed in California, Greenland, Southeast Asia, South Carolina, and Texas. After being honorably discharged from the service, Ronnie returned to Midland, Texas where he worked for Southwestern Bell Telephone Company. He retired after 27 years.

Ronnie dedicated extensive time to the Boy Scouts of America. He earned the rank of Eagle Scout and received Vigil honors in the Order of the Arrow. He volunteered many hours devoting his time to his Explorer Troup in Midland Texas, and the Buffalo Trails Boy Scout Camp in the Davis Mountains.

He returned to his family home in Zalma, Missouri in 2002, enjoying many years on the family farm where he had grown up as a young child. His hobbies included collecting vintage cars, car repair, reading, and home remodeling projects.

He is survived by his wife of 36 years Judith Lee Corbin; children Charles Carl Corbin, Robert Kenneth Corbin, Ruth Anne Corbin, & Jessica Parker Mitchell; brother Gary Lynn Corbin, 11 grandchildren, and 16 great grandchildren.

Services will be held at 2:00 p.m. Friday, December 6, 2019 at the Cook - Walden Capital Parks Funeral Home in Pflugerville Texas. A memorial service will also be held at Morgan’s Funeral Home in Advance, Missouri, December 11, 2019 with internment to follow at the Union Hill cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Patriot Paws Service organization. https://Patriotpaws.org

  • FAMILY

  • Ronald is survived by his wife of 36 years Judith Lee Corbin; children Charles Carl Corbin, Robert Kenneth Corbin, Ruth Anne Corbin, & Jessica Parker Mitchell; brother Gary Lynn Corbin, 11 grandchildren, and 16 great grandchildren.

Services

  • Visitation Friday, December 6, 2019
  • Funeral Service Friday, December 6, 2019

Memories

Ronald "Ronnie" Kenneth Corbin

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Wes Schoof

December 3, 2019

Robby Gaines

December 3, 2019

Many members of the Explorer Post that Ron Corbin led are still in touch with one another and met and have fun. Some of those members are;
Phillip Bell, Mark Nicolas, Sherry Kading, Linda Harrington, Robby, and Richard Gaines, Patti Paxton, Christi Branum, Beth Rusnak, Mark Philpy, Charles House, Kevin, and Bruce Belknap, John Shearer

Robby Gaines

December 3, 2019

First off I am sad to hear Mr. Corbin has passed away. He was a good man and a mentor to a lot of boys and girls.

I am one of those boys. I was a member of the Explorer post that met at the Corbin's house or garage on Kansas street in Midland in the 70s.

There were about fifteen boys and five girls in the post. On any given Saturday you could find us there working on someone's car or the project car we had, an old Ford pickup truck. We would tear down an engine and rebuild it, do a tuneup or just change the oil. You would walk up to a car and see legs; male and female sticking out under a car.

We became particularly good at working on Volkswagon Beetles.
We could drive a beetle onto the driveway and in ten minutes have the engine out and on a test stand that we had built. On the other hand, we could put the engine back in the car and be backing it out in fifteen minutes.

But what was unusual was that Ron Corbin welcomed us and always made us feel like family. It was not unusual to have any number of us spending all day and most of the night hanging around talking and doing things. And Ron was there to listen and advise where he could, and tell stories, lots of stories.

Those times were very special and this man made it that way.

All of us still see each other and refer to ourselves as "the Explorer Post". So here's to a special man that helped mentor a group of young men and women into adulthood. Thanks, Ron Corbin.

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Biography

In 1989, Ron, Jessica and I took a vacation through Ron’s childhood. We went to the area between Tulsa and Oklahoma City where Ron grew up. We started with McLintock Scout Ranch where Ron lived in a log cabin. He was so proud his parents lived in the house next door. Ron said there wasn’t even any reason to “sneak home” when he borrowed the car. We even saw the bus stops which really were snowy and uphill both ways. He showed us Sandy Creek and the bridge Gary sings about. He would swim there and live out the pretend dreams every young man has at that age. Every year dozens of troops from all around the country arrived to add new friends to the adventures.
We saw Bartlesville and the downtown Ron remembered so well. Next we went to Osage Hills State Park. Ron showed off the cabins and the dumpsters because cabin maintenance was his first job. He got his social security card at only eight years old.
We toured Claremore and Will Roger’s home where school trips used to go and Vinita and his beloved buffalo herd. The trip shifted to schools he attended. Herd grade school had become a private residence but Miami High School was still open. Some of the Boy Scout locations and Honor Rolls were still there, also. Ron relived having his Eagle Scout award banquet and getting picked for his Order of the Arrow, which he stood Vigil for to achieve Boy Scout’s highest honors.
In Miami, we ate at the Sonic and reminisced about the cars. The ’57 Chevy is still in the family so I could picture the late night tours by the teens as they circled to “see and be seen”. Ron always, really, had the nicest car, the loudest radio and the prettiest lady. He was the leader of the pack. He got the beer and the cigs which he always wore in his T-shirt sleeve, which was the hallmark of teenage freedom then.
Somehow you never expect to really see and touch your spouse’s history so intimately. To be able to picture the boy learning his job at eight. The youngster growing up in a free and easy wooded park area that happened to include hundreds of friends every summer; but, also included the responsibility of his own log cabin was so easy to see. And, finally, the teen crowing to full manhood in the full 50’s era of fast cars and loud radios. But this also included his Dad’s work with Woolaroc Museum and helping coach basketball games for the Phillips family of Phillips 66.
I can now hold dear very clear memories of ages 8 to 18 that most women never get to touch. I had met Ron the adult by touring the Davis Mountains. I now understand as much as possible how the contrasts of total freedom and the strictures of formal dinners at the Phillip’s , the contrasts and the similarities, helped create the astounding person we all hold so dear.
Judith Lee Corbin
Proudly, Mrs. Ronald K. Corbin