OBITUARY

Angelito De Castro Saqueton

October 3, 1938January 31, 2019

In Loving Memory

Angelito de Castro Saqueton, MD October 3, 1938 – January 31, 2019

February 22, 2019 Friday, 10:30 AM Mass Christ the King Church 7414 SE Michael Drive, Milwaukie, OR 97222. Reception – lunch at parish center.

February 23, 2019 Saturday, 10:00 AM Chapel Celebration of Life, Placement of the Urn Lincoln Memorial Park 11801 SE Mt Scott Blvd, Portland, OR 97086 Reception – lunch at Lincoln Memorial Reception Room.

HIS LIFE STORY AS TOLD BY LITO

Dr. Angelito C. Saqueton was born on October 3, 1938 in Kawit, Cavite, Philippines the youngest of nine children. His father was Angel Sambile Saqueton and his mother was Felicidad Rieta de Castro. The children were all professionals so that the townspeople thought they were wealthy. But they were not wealthy. As is typical of many Filipino families, the older siblings help financially with the education of the younger ones.

Lito was five years old during World War II. He had memories of that war. But his most vivid recollection of that war was when the Japanese soldiers got his father in the middle of the night for aiding the underground forces. His recollection was of bayonets close to their faces while they were lying down on banig mats on the floor while the older brothers were all facing the outside windows. Luckily, the Japanese soldiers did not allow his father to get dressed. They took him with his undershirt and underpants on. If they allowed him to get dressed, in his pants pocket were receipts from the underground showing the amount of rice that he supplied. When they released him from prison several months later, he wore the same undershirt and underpants on, but of course, they were tattered. He recalled that they were using fish bones to mend the rips and tears. He also recalled that the kindest person in prison were the educated Japanese officers. This reinforced his contention that you cannot judge a person by his race but by his individual character. This also solidified his belief in the value of education.

He was a lifelong “Number 2”. He was number two in a National Baby Contest during the Philippine Commonwealth years. Mrs Osmena, the wife of the Vice President, remarked “Que nina bonita!” He had curly hair, and Mrs Osmena thought he was a girl. He graduated salutatorian at Aguinaldo Elementary School. In 1954, he also graduated salutatorian at Kawit High School.

His medical schooling was interrupted by retinal detachment after the second year of medicine proper. That was when his greatest blessing came. He met and courted his future wife, Medy Cadiz Cajulis. *His wife says that broke his being lifelong “Number 2” because soon he topped the 1962 complete medical examinations given by the Philippine Board of Medical Examiners. He also graduated Cum Laude of UST medical class 1962.*

In 1962, he had a rotating internship at Clark Air Force Base as a requirement for graduation as a medical doctor (MD). In 1963, he had rotating internship at Ellis Hospital in Schenectady, New York. Looking back, that was a good internship with trainees from different countries – a fellow from Mayo Clinic, Albany Medical Center, New York, Canada, USA, Japan, Korea, India, Iraq, Argentina, France, Switzerland, and of course from three major universities in the Philippines. He recalled that when he was a pediatrician at Clark Air Force Base in Pampanga, Philippines (before the eruption of Mt Pinatubo) he was not getting enough sleep keeping the preemies alive so he made up his mind to specialize in dermatology. He had a three-year residency in Dermatology at the University of Chicago. He stayed on for another year as instructor in Dermatology at the University of Chicago before going home to the Philippines.

His practice was thriving in the Philippines, and Medy was well ensconced as instructor at the College of Education at the University of Santo Tomas when in 1972, President Marcos declared Martial Law. Decision time. Medical doctors and professors more established than him were leaving, and so, he decided to return to the U.S. In 1973, Lito joined a Dermatology Clinic in Norwich, Connecticut. Lito became very homesick and Medy did not like living in a small New England city after the bustling metropolis of Manila. Because of his severe ragweed allergy he looked at the pollen map and applied for a position. His choices were Portland, Oregon, Hawaii or Florida, but Portland accepted him first and this was close enough to the Philippines.

He liked Portland and the Oregon outdoors. He often referred to Oregon as “God’s country”. Family life made him forget about going home to the Philippines.

Lito was Vice President of the Oregon Dermatology Society when Mark Bauer, MD of Olympia, Washington was President. He stayed as a Kaiser Staff Dermatologist until his retirement in 2005. He retired as Adjunct Professor of Dermatology at Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU). He was voted as Outstanding Physician in 1996 and his daughter, Cecilia, was voted as Outstanding Physician in 2012. His two sons Gerry and Wil are also awardees in their professions. So are his son-in-law Charlie Muraki and daughter-in-law Julie Spottiswood Saqueton. He has five grandchildren Courtney, Kai, Ryan, Elena and Olivia.

Besides his professional career he also liked music, plants, fishing and tennis. Music – He played the piano by ear. He liked Philippine songs and knew many of the popular ones. He also prided himself in knowing some background about the music. For example, he knew that George Canseco (Kapantay ay Langit, Ngayon at Kailanman, Ikaw) was a journalist and had no formal musical training. He also liked Broadway Musicals and popular tunes. He knew that many composers/writers were of Jewish ancestry (Irving Berlin, Rodgers and Hammerstein, George and Ira Gershwin). Plants – He loved plants and prided himself in knowing the botanical names of some. Fishing – Come June he didn’t know whether to go to the coast for perch, the Columbia River for shad or the nearby lakes and reservoirs for trout. His best fishing buddy was the late Angel Ramirez. Tennis – He loved tennis although he was not a good tennis player. He loved playing tennis with his son, Wil (who is a good tennis player) whenever they got together. As president of the Filipino American Friendship Club of Oregon from 2008 to 2010 Lito organized Filipino cooking classes and encouraged the youth to plant with Friends of Trees. He was a 2012 Most Honored Elder Award Recipient of The Asian Reporter Foundation.

He liked to attend funeral services because the positive traits of the deceased are mentioned and he had a chance to compare himself. Most of the time he said he fell short, he could be a better father, a better husband, a better brother, a better friend.

Ultimately, he believed that the good Lord gave us time to change for the better. Do not waste it.

Remember me in quiet days,

while raindrops

whisper on your pane.

Remember in your memories

have no grief,

let the joy we knew remain.

Remember me if once you wake,

to catch a glimpse of red sunrise.

Remember when your thoughts

do turn to me,

know that I would not have you cry,

but live for me, and laugh for me.

When you are happy so am I.

Remember an old joke we shared.

Remember me when

spring walks by.

Think once of me when you are glad

And while you live, I shall not die!

Services

23 February

Service of Remembrance

10:00 am - 11:00 am

Lincoln Memorial Park & Funeral Home

11801 SE Mt Scott Blvd.
Portland, OR 97086

23 February

Reception

11:00 am - 1:00 pm

Lincoln Memorial Park & Funeral Home

11801 SE Mt Scott Blvd.
Portland, OR 97086

23 February

Commital

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Lincoln Memorial Park & Funeral Home

11801 SE Mt Scott Blvd.
Portland, OR 97086

REMEMBERING

Angelito De Castro Saqueton

have a memory or condolence to add?

ADD A MEMORY
Julie Manipon

February 18, 2019

Dear Medy, Gerry, Cecile and Willie - so saddened to hear of Lito's death. What a distinguished doctor he was and a humble gentleman as well! We know you will miss him greatly but it is so wonderful to know he is free - at peace with our Lord Jesus. I will always remember Lito's comment to me - back in 1988 when my mother-in-law (Espectation Manipon) died, we were at St Cecelia's and Lito was there for the funeral. It was such an ugly, rainy day and I had commented to Lito that is was an ugly day for a funeral and he said, with all kindness, "any day is a good day for a funeral" - I know Lito meant my mother-in-law was with the Lord. It was an honor to know Lito...until we meet again! Love to each of you!

Marsha Paras

February 13, 2019

Dear Medy,

My heart sank when last year I saw a family picture where all of you seemed happy just to be around Lito who was sitting on a wheelchair. It was not the Lito you came with when you visited me at home a few times. His genuinely happy smile seemed glued on his kind face; always saying something funny; sprightly moving about; squeezing or hugging you at every turn.

The wheelchair was an image of helplessness, but as always, you stood out as the pillar of strength for the family. All the smiles must have released a strong warmth that enveloped Lito in contentment. If I was sad seeing that image, I couldn't imagine what you must have felt when he finally had to leave.

But your strong Faith surpasses human emotions. Your big family is truly blessed to have you as their brilliantly shining guiding Star. God keep you always in His embrace.

Sincerely,
Marsha

Gloria Rivera

February 9, 2019

To Medy, and the Saqueton Family,
July and I are so saddened to hear about Lito's passing. We hope that you find comfort in the notion that he is now at peace and in the comforting arms of the Lord.
I have always admired people, especially men, who can play the piano, much more by ear. And Lito was one of them. My fondest memories of him is when we go to your house and practice Filipino, as well as English, Christmas carols and he would play the piano like there's no tomorrow. He was such a gentle soul that the Filipino American Friendship Club is so blessed to have the Saqueton Family as a pioneer and that the Filipino culture, heritage and values are continually instilled in the psyche of every Filipino in the Portland area and vicinity.
Lito, thank you for all the things you have done for the Club and for your fellow men. We will miss you but the memories will linger on. Rest in peace.

July and Glo Rivera
888 Dalumpinas Rd., Lingsat
San Fernando City, La Union
Philippines 2500

Joel Cadiz

February 9, 2019

The memories i had with kuya Lito was when i was still a kid then.... i remember him to be gentle and soft spoken, with humor - not the typical doctor that you will be afraid of to visit. Every time we bring our “Señor ” (the Cadiz’ family heirloom image of Christ in passion) for procession I remember him and auntie Medy because auntie always tell me the story of how they met in the procession...
Rest in Peace Kuya Lito: enjoy the bliss of heaven...

James Buxman

February 9, 2019

Dr. Saqueton was not only a true gentleman but also a highly respected dermatologist in Portland. My late wife Dr. Melodie Buxman was an academic dermatologist at OHSU and they had weekly dermatology "grand rounds" where they presented challenging cases for discussion. Dr. Saqueton always attended and according to Melodie often gave thoughtful and helpful input. She often commented on his dermatology excellence. After Melodie's passing I married Beth and became integrated into her filipino community where I developed a personal friendship with Lito. We shared a love of tennis and would often talk about the Grand Slam events like Wimbledon or US Open and our favorite players.
Lito, you have certainly inspired all of us to be better in every way.

James Buxman

max perena

February 8, 2019

To one of the kindest and gentlest persons I have ever known, I am lucky to have met you but saddened that you have left us.
When my daughter Jemma was in Portland for her studies, I advised her that if she has any problem-call Uncle Lito or Aunt Medy. I thank you for being available and for helping Jemma.
Yes Lito, we had fun time in Hawaii . Remembering the crab feed at my home, making siopao and baking buko pie with Boni and Dorina. We took one of the pies to the hotel. Next morning I was hungry for a pie but I did not know that you ate the whole thing for breakfast. I thought that was memorable and funny. It must have been a delicious pie.

Will continue to pray for you. With our love,
Max. Jemma and Jochelle

FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY

Lito learned to play the piano for two years when he was in grade schoo. After years of playing on his own he developed an ear for music. He can play any tune that he has heard

FROM THE FAMILY

The family acquired the Lyric piano towards the end of World War II. A family from Manila loaded it in a cart and traded it for sacks of rice.
Lito’s piano playing during our balikbayan years, 1998 to 2013 brought joy to neighbors in Kawit, Cavite.

FROM THE FAMILY

Gerry, Willy, Lito at our 2nd home.

FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY

Lito learned to play the piano for two years when he was in grade schoo. After years of playing on his own he developed an ear for music. He can play any tune that he has heard

FROM THE FAMILY

The family acquired the Lyric piano towards the end of World War II. A family from Manila loaded it in a cart and traded it for sacks of rice.
Lito’s piano playing during our balikbayan years, 1998 to 2013 brought joy to neighbors in Kawit, Cavite.

FROM THE FAMILY

Gerry, Willy, Lito at our 2nd home.

FROM THE FAMILY

Lito, the pianist, at caroling.

FROM THE FAMILY

Bennie & Angel. Angel used to sing as Lito played on the piano.

FROM THE FAMILY

Lito played Minamahal, a Philippine love song, on the grand piano at the summer palace of Queen Liliʻuokalani, a composer of Hawaiian music, author and the last reigning monarch of the Kingdom of Hawaii. That was when we attended a Dermatology Academy in the 1980s.


In France he played La Vie En Rose at one of the castles where we stayed overnight during a group tour we joined after retirement.

FROM THE FAMILY

Lolo Lito with Courtney.

FROM THE FAMILY

With Kai.

FROM THE FAMILY

With Ryan.

Biography

In Loving Memory

Angelito de Castro Saqueton, MD
October 3, 1938 – January 31, 2019


February 22, 2019 Friday, 10:30 AM Mass Christ the King Church
7414 SE Michael Drive, Milwaukie, OR 97222.
Reception – lunch at parish center.

February 23, 2019 Saturday, 10:00 AM Chapel
Celebration of Life, Placement of the Urn
Lincoln Memorial Park 11801 SE Mt Scott Blvd, Portland, OR 97086
Reception – lunch at Lincoln Memorial Reception Room.

HIS LIFE STORY
AS TOLD BY LITO

Dr. Angelito C. Saqueton was born on October 3, 1938 in Kawit, Cavite, Philippines the youngest of nine children. His father was Angel Sambile Saqueton and his mother was Felicidad Rieta de Castro. The children were all professionals so that the townspeople thought they were wealthy. But they were not wealthy. As is typical of many Filipino families, the older siblings help financially with the education of the younger ones.

Lito was five years old during World War II. He had memories of that war. But his most vivid recollection of that war was when the Japanese soldiers got his father in the middle of the night for aiding the underground forces. His recollection was of bayonets close to their faces while they were lying down on banig mats on the floor while the older brothers were all facing the outside windows. Luckily, the Japanese soldiers did not allow his father to get dressed. They took him with his undershirt and underpants on. If they allowed him to get dressed, in his pants pocket were receipts from the underground showing the amount of rice that he supplied. When they released him from prison several months later, he wore the same undershirt and underpants on, but of course, they were tattered. He recalled that they were using fish bones to mend the rips and tears. He also recalled that the kindest person in prison were the educated Japanese officers. This reinforced his contention that you cannot judge a person by his race but by his individual character. This also solidified his belief in the value of education.

He was a lifelong “Number 2”. He was number two in a National Baby Contest during the Philippine Commonwealth years. Mrs Osmena, the wife of the Vice President, remarked “Que nina bonita!” He had curly hair, and Mrs Osmena thought he was a girl. He graduated salutatorian at Aguinaldo Elementary School. In 1954, he also graduated salutatorian at Kawit High School.

His medical schooling was interrupted by retinal detachment after the second year of medicine proper. That was when his greatest blessing came. He met and courted his future wife, Medy Cadiz Cajulis. *His wife says that broke his being lifelong “Number 2” because soon he topped the 1962 complete medical examinations given by the Philippine Board of Medical Examiners. He also graduated Cum Laude of UST medical class 1962.*

In 1962, he had a rotating internship at Clark Air Force Base as a requirement for graduation as a medical doctor (MD). In 1963, he had rotating internship at Ellis Hospital in Schenectady, New York. Looking back, that was a good internship with trainees from different countries – a fellow from Mayo Clinic, Albany Medical Center, New York, Canada, USA, Japan, Korea, India, Iraq, Argentina, France, Switzerland, and of course from three major universities in the Philippines. He recalled that when he was a pediatrician at Clark Air Force Base in Pampanga, Philippines (before the eruption of Mt Pinatubo) he was not getting enough sleep keeping the preemies alive so he made up his mind to specialize in dermatology. He had a three-year residency in Dermatology at the University of Chicago. He stayed on for another year as instructor in Dermatology at the University of Chicago before going home to the Philippines.

His practice was thriving in the Philippines, and Medy was well ensconced as instructor at the College of Education at the University of Santo Tomas when in 1972, President Marcos declared Martial Law. Decision time. Medical doctors and professors more established than him were leaving, and so, he decided to return to the U.S. In 1973, Lito joined a Dermatology Clinic in Norwich, Connecticut. Lito became very homesick and Medy did not like living in a small New England city after the bustling metropolis of Manila. Because of his severe ragweed allergy he looked at the pollen map and applied for a position. His choices were Portland, Oregon, Hawaii or Florida, but Portland accepted him first and this was close enough to the Philippines.

He liked Portland and the Oregon outdoors. He often referred to Oregon as “God’s country”. Family life made him forget about going home to the Philippines.

Lito was Vice President of the Oregon Dermatology Society when Mark Bauer, MD of Olympia, Washington was President. He stayed as a Kaiser Staff Dermatologist until his retirement in 2005. He retired as Adjunct Professor of Dermatology at Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU). He was voted as Outstanding Physician in 1996 and his daughter, Cecilia, was voted as Outstanding Physician in 2012. His two sons Gerry and Wil are also awardees in their professions. So are his son-in-law Charlie Muraki and daughter-in-law Julie Spottiswood Saqueton. He has five grandchildren Courtney, Kai, Ryan, Elena and Olivia.

Besides his professional career he also liked music, plants, fishing and tennis.
Music – He played the piano by ear. He liked Philippine songs and knew many of the popular ones. He also prided himself in knowing some background about the music. For example, he knew that George Canseco (Kapantay ay Langit, Ngayon at Kailanman, Ikaw) was a journalist and had no formal musical training. He also liked Broadway Musicals and popular tunes. He knew that many composers/writers were of Jewish ancestry (Irving Berlin, Rodgers and Hammerstein, George and Ira Gershwin).
Plants – He loved plants and prided himself in knowing the botanical names of some.
Fishing – Come June he didn’t know whether to go to the coast for perch, the Columbia River for shad or the nearby lakes and reservoirs for trout. His best fishing buddy was the late Angel Ramirez.
Tennis – He loved tennis although he was not a good tennis player. He loved playing tennis with his son, Wil (who is a good tennis player) whenever they got together.

As president of the Filipino American Friendship Club of Oregon from 2008 to 2010 Lito organized Filipino cooking classes and encouraged the youth to plant with Friends of Trees.
He was a 2012 Most Honored Elder Award Recipient of The Asian Reporter Foundation.

He liked to attend funeral services because the positive traits of the deceased are mentioned and he had a chance to compare himself. Most of the time he said he fell short, he could be a better father, a better husband, a better brother, a better friend.

Ultimately, he believed that the good Lord gave us time to change for the better. Do not waste it.

Remember Me in Quiet Days

Remember me in quiet days,


while raindrops

whisper on your pane.

Remember in your memories

have no grief,

let the joy we knew remain.

Remember me if once you wake,

to catch a glimpse of red sunrise.

Remember when your thoughts

do turn to me,

know that I would not have you cry,

but live for me, and laugh for me.

When you are happy so am I.

Remember an old joke we shared.

Remember me when

spring walks by.

Think once of me when you are glad

And while you live, I shall not die!