OBITUARY

Beth Nadine Windsor

October 23, 1934April 25, 2021

Beth Nadine Windsor, age 86, of Seattle, Washington passed away on Sunday, April 25, 2021. Beth was born October 23, 1934.

Fond memories and expressions of sympathy may be shared at www.Evergreen-Washelli.com for the Windsor family.

Services

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Memories

Beth Nadine Windsor

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Eileen Scott

May 12, 2021

Typical of almost any given moment when Beth and her girls got together!

Leah Chapple

May 10, 2021

Grandma Beth was always there - a gentle, lovable, constancy in my life. I remember pulling up to grandma's apartment, she would greet us at the door or buzz us in. The musty sweet smell and dark gold carpet, up two short flights of stairs, and there was grandma Beth, always in the hall waiting for us. Her door was always open to us, literally. I remember holding her hands, so soft and wrinkled, her waving goodbye at the door. With grandma, every person always found love and acceptance. She always had the same kind of mint gum in her purse. The smell of spearmint reminds me of her. When she had nothing to say she would shrug, raise her eyebrows with her lips closed in a little smile, and then break out in a huge grin and laugh. She loved sweet things, always up for a root beer float, hot chocolate, piece of cake, or ambrosia salad. Grandma would drive us around in her old red car with the black stripes and roll windows, which was nice and toasty in the winter and even hotter in the summer. Lovingly displayed all over her apartment were family photos and an impressive collection of Windsor teacups. Somehow she managed to be at everyone's sport games, talent shows, plays, concerts, reunions, weddings, and holiday gatherings. She loved pale pink and knew she looked wonderful wearing it, and she really did! Her favorite thing was to be surrounded by family and was at such ease, like we were a warm blanket and she could wrap herself up in us. She brought us together, saw passed our differences, and loved us. It is these small moments, a collection of loving over a lifetime, that truly awakens within the real sense of the extraordinary blessing that was Grandma Beth. Thank you for your life, your presence, your love. You have made a profound difference in my life, and in the lives of so many. I love you Grandma Beth, for always.

Eileen Scott

May 3, 2021

Grandma Beth with her great grandchildren 4 years ago. Two more were born since this picture and one on the way.

Eileen Scott

May 3, 2021

Grandma Beth surrounded by almost all of her 16 grandchildren, and all being goofs.

Eileen Scott

May 3, 2021

Mom was happiest with her girls around her.

Shiloh Meisler

May 2, 2021

I am 2nd on mom's list of 5 daughters. Mom had a 'common sense' approach to dealing with unexceptable behavior. Like any family, we had rules, no lying, no stealing, be kind, treat other's the way you want to be treated, always do what you say you're going to do, if you know you're not going to do it, don't say you will. This has to do with the 2nd rule: When I was 9 or 10, I walked down to Benson's Store 4 blocks away. There were those turn style candy & toy dispensers out front. To my glee, someone had stuck a fake coin in the toy one, and it got stuck. I twisted it a couple of times put the 2 little plastic containers in my pocket and skipped home happily! Walked through the back door and mom was in the kitchen. I proudly showed her what I got. "Where did you get those?" She asked. I happily touted my good fortune. "Those aren't yours" she said. "We have to take them back" So back we went. She had me place them on the counter explaining to Mr. Benson how I got them & apologize. It was stealing, even though I didn't put the coin in, I knew it & I couldn't excuse it. There was no yelling, no spanking, just quietly walked me back to the store. It worked. I knew stealing. I knew I had stolen. It never happened again. Thank you for your soft Common Sense approach to discipiline mom. It worked. I Love you & I'll think of you Every day!

Eileen Scott

May 2, 2021

One of our favorite pictures of mom. Dad took it on the side of the road during one of our road trips.

Jenny Young

May 2, 2021

In 1973 at the age of 15, I came down with a devastating polio like paralysis called Guillain Barre Syndrome. I went from being a healthy active teenager to completely paralyzed and barely breathing within five days. My prognosis was very grim. My mother would walk to work every morning to cook in the elementary school kitchen, then after work she would walk to the hospital every day for the several weeks I was there. She showed up in her white uniform, armful of mail to go through and newspapers to read. My ICU room had no television, so sometimes she would just sit in silence looking out the window. What she did consistently every time was stroke my hands, arms and face with her healing hands. There was something about mom's hands that was particularly magic. After being flopped around like a rag doll by the busy staff, and moved very mechanically for the many tests and procedures I endured, mom's hands reminded me that I was human. She would stay for a few hours until it was time to walk home and make dinner for the rest of her large family. She was an example to me of incredible patience, indomitable strength and fortitude. When I was discharged from the hospital and still needing an immense amount of physical therapy, I arrived home to brand new sheets, a beautiful white bedspread and an extra thick mattress pad, since I had lost so much weight! She made my own room feel like a luxury hotel suite. She even made sure that the 30+ plants I owned were watered and well cared for the whole time I was gone. Everyone who came within mom's orbit was given a boost to thrive. Thank you mom for your many gifts of love and care. I love you forever.

Adrienne Chapple

May 1, 2021

As the youngest of Mom’s five girls, my memory of the countless young people who lived, stayed, visited us was only in my very young years. My memory of Mom is one of quiet strength. She was not an in-depth communicator, but she observed and felt people’s needs. She was a doer in the sense that she saw a need was able to give people a sense that their life was special, and she was so happy to be sharing her time and space with them. She wasn’t big on housekeeping, but her home was always welcoming and comfortable. Her requirements for her daughters were simple. Love each other, speak honestly, and be kind to others. She loved to laugh! When she and her daughters would get together, we would always end up doubled over in fits laughter and wiping tears from our eyes. She loved with an open heart, laughed easily, gave her time generously. If any family travelled far from her, she would simply want you keep in touch yet, we knew she would pray for us every day. Her prayers would include any extended family, foster kids, any children’s and grandchildren’s friends, anyone who came onto her radar who needed love and compassion sent out. She didn’t tell people she was praying, she just prayed. When we began to be too busy with our lives and seemed to be drifting apart, Mom demanded just one day a year that we all come together. We started with a summer picnic. This first picnic reminded us what a wonderful family we had. We grew closer than ever because Mom knew that if we just spent time together, we would see each other as she saw each of us and that each of her daughters, individually, but even more, together, with their unique personalities, were just too beautiful to be apart. Those picnics turned in to ever more reasons to gather, laugh, dance, sing, and express our love for one another. She was such a sweet, and generous soul. I think that she did what she came here to do, which was to spread love, generosity of spirit, and compassion. I love you forever, Mom!

Sam Windsor

April 30, 2021

I met Beth in a high school study hall in 1950. We were married March 15, 1953. All of her life Beth was a strong, effective advocate for those needing her tenacity . She taught youngsters how to laugh in the face of adversity, turning the rough spot in time into a step up and out of difficulty.

Her small size housed a loving heart of Grand Opera dimensions. Children and young adults receiving help learned to gain control of their lives and often were surprised that such a large bundle of love would cast such a small shadow. The memory of her joy, her sometime giggling delight changing frightening conndition into a visible path of hopeful perspective; will stay with each of us who knew her, forever!

Beth had the courage to live her life her own way and helped others pursue their independent dreams. I'm sure she has already been given a loving reception in non-phsical dimensions. I envision her receiving a hug from Christ with a quiet, "Well done, little girl; well done"!