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Hines-Rinaldi Funeral Home

11800 New Hampshire Ave, Silver Spring, MD

OBITUARY

Virginia M. Castillo

July 5, 1927September 8, 2019
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Virginia M. Castillo was born on July 5, 1927 and passed away on September 8, 2019 in Silver Spring, Maryland.

Services

  • Visitation Wednesday, September 11, 2019
  • Funeral Service Thursday, September 12, 2019
  • Burial Thursday, September 12, 2019

Memories

Virginia M. Castillo

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Lorraine Saxon

September 10, 2019

Dear Ate Ienne, Ate Ian, Kuya Audie, Andre, and Adrian,

We are lifting your family up in prayer and asking the Lord to comfort you through this difficult time as you mourn and miss Mamang. I've always loved her like my own and can only imagine the grief you are carrying right now. In time, may God's peace that passes all understanding flood your hearts, knowing that Mamang is rejoicing with her Heavenly Father... and, of course, with Papang! We love you all and will continue to pray.

"Precious in the sight of the LORD is the death of His saints." (Psalm 116:15)

Love always,
Lorraine for the Niguidulas

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Biography

Virginia Magalit Castillo was born on July 5, 1927, in New Washington, Aklan in the Philippines under American Occupation. Virginia grew up in a small fishing village, and her home nestled between the ocean and a river, which explains her pickiness about eating only the best fish. She was in high school when WWII erupted, and because older siblings were either guerrillas and scouts for the United States, their whole family went into hiding from the Japanese. When the war ended, she returned to school and graduated from Capiz National High School. It was there that she met Adriano Castillo, who stole her heart. Adriano and Virginia continued their studies in Manila, where he became an architect, and she became a school teacher.
They married on July 5, 1955, which was also her birthday. God blessed them with five children: Adrienne, Aurean, Audie, Andre and Adrian (their spouses Roberto Guerrero (deceased), Romel Gomez, Louwella Castillo and Lorraine Castillo) and four grandsons Miguel, Ryan, Rainier and Angelo. Adriano passed away in 2015.
Mrs. Castillo was a teacher for 30 years, and handled Grades I and II. It was important for her to take over the first two years of elementary school, which were the essential learning years that molded the student’s foundation. She taught them not just reading, writing and arithmetic, but also character and self-worth. She was as strict as she was kind, a benevolent disciplinarian.
Mamang was also way ahead of her time. Even before “environmental awareness” became fashionable, she recognized the need to care of our environment back in the 1960s. She was one of the starters of the “Green Revolution” in the Philippines and taught her students about how to be environmentally conscious. The Green Revolution was a project of the First Lady Imelda Marcos, to beautify the country by planting fruit trees and vegetables in the cities. Mamang was also concerned with poverty among her students. While a teacher, she planned and administered a feeding center by raising funds, weighing every malnourished child, and feeding them breakfast and lunch. She argued, “How can they think if their stomachs are empty and hurting.”
Nearing retirement, she went to the United States on two occasions. The first was when Adrienne and Roberto were married in 1983 and again in 1986 when she stayed permanently. She took care of all her grandsons in the US, starting with Miguel and later, Ryan and Rainier. Mang also took care of Angelo in Manila when she visited in 2012. In many ways, Mamang was the matriarch of her clan. She guided the lives of many, not just her children, but others. She welcomed everyone in her home and seemed to always have room for one more. She helped countless children to go to school - nieces, nephews, relatives, and strangers’ children. Many lived with her family in their home. Thanks to Mamang's generosity, these folks are now living very productive lives.
Virginia was kind to everyone. She preached to her children about the importance of AMISTAD. In Spanish, it means friendship, sympathy and concern for others. She led by example and inculcated the virtues of gentleness, kindness, humility, tolerance to hardships.
Above all, Virginia was prayerful. "Everything to God in Prayer" was one of her favorite phrases, and she passed along her steadfast faith in God to her children and grandchildren.
We will miss you, Mamang. You had a profound influence on our lives, and we will not be where we are if it had not been for you and your sacrifices. You have made this world a better place and your legacy will always live with us.