OBITUARY

Martin F. Connolly

July 21, 1949February 26, 2018
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Mr. Connolly died Monday, February 26th after valiantly fighting colon cancer with a positive attitude.

Martin had previously been employed by the St. Louis Board of Education in Communications and also served as an on air personality for the district’s radio station. He was a member of the Actors’ Equity Association. He was known as Cormac O’Sullivan to members of the Society for Creative Anachronism. He was also known as an unofficial ambassador for Tower Grove Park. He became well known as he walked his beloved Great Danes Bridget, Duke and Duchess daily through the park.

He was born July 21, 1949, in Troy, New York, the son of Frank X. Connolly and Marjorie (Sullivan) Connolly. He graduated from St. Ambrose College, Davenport, IA and earned a Masters of Fine Arts in Theater from St. Louis University.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, Great Dane Rescue Midwest or Barnes Jewish Hospital.

Those left to honor his memory include his brothers Paul of Mount Pleasant, IA, and Ed of Blaine, MN, sisters and brothers-in-law Mary and Dennis Andereck and Pat and Chris Brady all of Allen, TX, his nieces Deni and Erin Andereck and his nephew, Edward Brady.

A funeral mass for Martin F. Connolly (Marty) , 68, a resident of St. Louis, MO will be held Wednesday, March 7th at 10:00 a.m. at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, St. Louis, where he was an active member and lector. His brother, the Rev. Paul Connolly will officiate. Internment will be in Saints Peter and Paul Catholic Cemetery.

A visitation will be held from 4-8 p.m. at Calcaterra Funeral Home, St. Louis, where a Vigil Service will be held at 7:30 p.m.

  • FAMILY

  • Frank X. Connolly, Father
  • Marjorie (nee: Sullivan) Connolly, Mother
  • Paul Connolly, Brother
  • Ed Connolly, Brother
  • Mary (Dennis) Andereck, Sister
  • Pat (Chris) Brady, Sister
  • Deni Andereck, Niece
  • Erin Andereck, Niece
  • Edward Brady, Nephew

Services

PREVIOUS SERVICES:

  • Memorial Visitation Tuesday, March 6, 2018
  • Funeral Mass Wednesday, March 7, 2018

PREVIOUS SERVICES:

  • Inurnment
REMEMBERING

Martin F. Connolly

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Jeff Reeves

March 6, 2018

With heartfelt thoughts and memories, may you fly with angel wings to your next great adventure! Sato dark

Aaron Aubuchon

March 3, 2018



Thank you Marty Connolly.

You made an impression that lasts. Not just that day, but every time we met. Around a campfire, you sang songs that told stories both valorous and silly, that were clear to the ear even when you were deep in your cups. At a dartboard, you had an accuracy that I never could beat. On the tournament field, few could penetrate your defense and woe to any who judged you by your stature.
I've thanked you for all of this before, but thank you again. Thank you for coming to hang out with me at my modest campfire at my first Lilies War, a twenty year old kid in a pup tent. Thank you for sponsoring my project at Queens Prize, a humble spear that I still carry. Thank you for stories of the battlefield, terrifying or humorous. Thank you for the Best introduction to the SCA, where I have made lifelong friends.

Thank you for your friendship.
Farewell.

Aubrey d'Aubusson

March 3, 2018

When I met him, Sir Cormac O'Sullivan was the local representative of the royal family, a Baron, but more than just a man with a title, Cormac completely filled the role with his presence and demeanor.
My first encounter with him was at my first local SCA (historical re-enactment) event, the coronation of a new king.
The King called for the Knights to come forward and stay, to protect the Kingdom, and then He and Her Majesty removed their crowns and placed them on the empty thrones and walked out of the now silent throne room.
In the front of the group of knights was a rather stocky man, formidable, but visibly the shortest among them, with a white beard and quite a round middle. He looked to me like a character written by Tolkien.
Cormac stood less than ten feet from where I was seated with a very real sharp sword in his hand.
The double doors flew open and in strode a group carrying weapons and banners and a man in chain mail with an enclosed helmet and a sword in his hand. Cormac stopped the entire procession by commanding them, with a voice that filled the room, to halt and demanded that this leader identify himself and his intentions. Once it was established that he presented the right coat of arms and bore the Prince's ring, Cormac ordered him to remove his helmet. He was obviously the right man, for when his face was revealed, Cormac lowered his sword and took a knee, as did the other Knights behind him. I was used to theatre, but this was Real, made real by a man for whom it was important to present it as reality to folks like myself and my friend, new to the experience, and indeed to others who had seen ceremonies like this many times before.
I learned from him in conversations later that he had trained his comportment in theater and his voice for radio, but when I met him, that training was well in his past and it came naturally from him.
Thank you Marty Connolly. You made an impression that lasts. Not just that day, but every time we met.

Dolores Kane

March 2, 2018

One of my favorite stage performances involved Marty in his portrayal of Uncle Willie in "The Philadelphia Story". I still get a kick thinking about his delivery of the line "And who will go with me in my little car?"

FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY

Biography

Mr. Connolly died Monday, February 26th after valiantly fighting colon cancer with a positive attitude.

Martin had previously been employed by the St. Louis Board of Education in Communications and also served as an on air personality for the district’s radio station. He was a member of the Actors’ Equity Association. He was known as Cormac O’Sullivan to members of the Society for Creative Anachronism. He was also known as an unofficial ambassador for Tower Grove Park. He became well known as he walked his beloved Great Danes Bridget, Duke and Duchess daily through the park.

He was born July 21, 1949, in Troy, New York, the son of Frank X. Connolly and Marjorie (Sullivan) Connolly. He graduated from St. Ambrose College, Davenport, IA and earned a Masters of Fine Arts in Theater from St. Louis University.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, Great Dane Rescue Midwest or Barnes Jewish Hospital.

Those left to honor his memory include his brothers Paul of Mount Pleasant, IA, and Ed of Blaine, MN, sisters and brothers-in-law Mary and Dennis Andereck and Pat and Chris Brady all of Allen, TX, his nieces Deni and Erin Andereck and his nephew, Edward Brady.

A funeral mass for Martin F. Connolly (Marty) , 68, a resident of St. Louis, MO will be held Wednesday, March 7th at 10:00 a.m. at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, St. Louis, where he was an active member and lector. His brother, the Rev. Paul Connolly will officiate. Internment will be in Saints Peter and Paul Catholic Cemetery.

A visitation will be held from 4-8 p.m. at Calcaterra Funeral Home, St. Louis, where a Vigil Service will be held at 7:30 p.m.