OBITUARY

Theodore A. Hannibal, Jr.

October 10, 1939April 13, 2018
Play Tribute Movie

Hannibal, Jr. Theodore A. “Ted”

On April 13, 2018 THEODORE A. “Ted” HANNIBAL, JR.; beloved husband of Ginger Hannibal; loving father of Jeanne Marie Andrews and her husband Richard, Theodore A. Hannibal, III and his wife Allison and David Stuart Hannibal and his wife Missy; dear brother of Thomas Julian Hannibal and Margaret Eldridge; cherished “Pop Pop” of Caitlin, Daniel, Jack, Brigid, Dalila, Xavier, Cecilia, Roman, Violet and Vivian.

The family will receive friends at the LEMMON FUNERAL HOME OF DULANEY VALLEY INC., 10 W. Padonia Road (at York Road) Timonium, MD 21093 on Wednesday, April 18, 2-4 & 7-9pm.

A Funeral Mass will be celebrated in the Chapel at St. John the Evangelist, 13305 Long Green Pike, Hydes, MD 21082 on Thursday, April 19 at 11am.

Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.

In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy may be directed in Ted’s memory to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, please visit www.nami.org.

A Guest Book is available at www.lemmonfuneralhome.com

  • FAMILY

  • Theodore Albert Hannibal, Sr., Father
  • Margaret Reamy, Mother
  • Ginger Hannibal, Wife
  • Jeanne Marie Andrews, Daughter
  • Richard Andrews, Son-in-law
  • Theodore A. Hannibal, III, Son
  • Allison Hannibal, Daughter-in-law
  • David Stuart Hannibal, Son
  • Missy Hannibal, Daughter-in-law
  • Dear brother of Thomas Julian Hannibal and Margaret Eldridge; cherished “Pop Pop” of Caitlin, Daniel, Jack, Brigid, Dalila, Xavier, Cecilia, Roman, Violet and Vivian.

Services

  • Visitation Wednesday, April 18, 2018
  • Visitation Wednesday, April 18, 2018
  • Funeral Mass Thursday, April 19, 2018
  • Committal Service Thursday, April 19, 2018
REMEMBERING

Theodore A. Hannibal, Jr.

have a memory or condolence to add?

ADD A MEMORY

receive updates when new memories are posted

RECEIVE UPDATES
Carl Wallin

April 19, 2018

I worked with Ted for many years in Cockeysville. He was truly one of the nicest people I ever had the pleasure of working with. Always smiling and never a bad word about anyone. I think everyone who knew him probably feels the same. He will be greatly missed by those that knew and love him. He and his family will be in our thoughts and prayers

FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY

Biography

Hannibal, Jr. Theodore A. “Ted”

On April 13, 2018 THEODORE A. “Ted” HANNIBAL, JR.; beloved husband of Ginger Hannibal; loving father of Jeanne Marie Andrews and her husband Richard, Theodore A. Hannibal, III and his wife Allison and David Stuart Hannibal and his wife Missy; dear brother of Thomas Julian Hannibal and Margaret Eldridge; cherished “Pop Pop” of Caitlin, Daniel, Jack, Brigid, Dalila, Xavier, Cecilia, Roman, Violet and Vivian.

The family will receive friends at the LEMMON FUNERAL HOME OF DULANEY VALLEY INC., 10 W. Padonia Road (at York Road) Timonium, MD 21093 on Wednesday, April 18, 2-4 & 7-9pm.

A Funeral Mass will be celebrated in the Chapel at St. John the Evangelist, 13305 Long Green Pike, Hydes, MD 21082 on Thursday, April 19 at 11am.

Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.

In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy may be directed in Ted’s memory to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, please visit www.nami.org.



Jeanne's Eulogy


Good morning. On behalf of my mother, Teddy and David I want to thank you for joining us this morning to celebrate the life of our Dad. I know that if he were here, he would be sure to greet you with that legendary Hannibal grin and a booming
“How the Hell are you!”

I’d like to take a few moments to share with you what it was that made Ted Hannibal so truly incredible... because there are no two ways about it... he was one of a kind.

Daddy grew up on a 50 acre farm in Jacksonville, where he lived with his brother Tom, sister Margaret, parents, and grandparents who had emigrated from Germany. Life on the farm wasn’t easy, money was scarce - he didn’t even have indoor plumbing until he was in high school. But one thing that was present in spades was love. He had a tight bond with his siblings and loved his parents, I’d go as far to say that he idolized his Dad, and from everything I have heard it was well justified.

When he was in his early 20s, he happened to be attending a horse show in Perry Hall. There he met a gorgeous, one of a kind woman, who would later become his wife. Side note, thank you Aunt Margaret for setting them up! - you KNOW a girl from Dundalk wouldn’t have found her way to a horse show in the boonies otherwise. After the show mom needed a ride home, which Dad was happy to provide. Dad had this beautiful Austin Healey convertible, red of course, since it was his favorite color. Once in Dundalk she invited him in for a glass of water and he met her grandparents. As he was leaving the house, her grandmother ran to the basement and yelled down the steps to Mom's mother who was doing laundry “Get up here and see what Ginger brought home!”

These two kids fell in love and it grew every day, every year, every decade they were together. He didn’t just become the most important person in Mom’s world though, he filled a hole that existed within her family. His generosity, love, kindness, and laughter brought joy to her mother and siblings. Uncle Bobby has said he was like the father they never had. He even taught his mother-in-law, at 48 years of age to drive - stick shift. There was this one time when they were practicing in Dundalk. Mom was with them sitting in the back seat of the car. My grandmother was stopped at a 4 way stop and Dad was instructing her how to make the upcoming move, which involved a U-turn. The car behind them started laying on their horn. Dad rolled down his window and yelled “Blow it Out Your Ass” At this point Mom turned around and said Ted - it’s a cop! He said “I don’t give a damn.” The police officer got out of the car and approached the passenger side and said, “What did you say?” and Dad very clearing stated “Blow It Out Your Ass!” - he said Get out of the car. Dad went on to explain he thought it was some punk kid, and he was trying to teach his mother in law how to drive. Well, the cop let him go but said, get this, “We don’t use that language in Dundalk.”

Dad was serving in the Navy when they were engaged, but locally so he was able to come home on weekends. He was approached by the Captain who saw in Dad a potential for advancement in the Navy and said he wanted him to take the test to be a Quartermaster. Now this was a position that people actually took classes to achieve, but Dad just had a copy of the book to study from. Wouldn’t you know he passed that test, scoring higher then the fellas that were school educated.... I was always pretty impressed with that. He probably could have had a good career in the Navy, he loved the ocean, but he loved Ginger McAvoy A HELL OF A LOT more.

Mom and Dad shared the kind of bond that I’ve only ever read about in fairytales. I’m not saying their years of marriage were problem free, but the COMPLETE and UTTER lifelong devotion to each other takes my breath away. Mom was the most important thing in his world and this was obviously mutual. She said recently “to this day when he kisses me, my knees buckle.”

The boys and I had the great fortune to be born into this family. Dad was just The Best. He always put his family first. When we were little there were times he needed to work two jobs to keep up with expenses. On top of that he took night classes to pursue a Management degree. But he could have cared less about career advancement or social status, he only took the classes to try to make life better for us.

Our childhood was filled, I mean FILLED with fun, laughter, silliness, and love. Some of our favorite memories were times spent outside as a family. He would take us on hikes - all over, we would go crabbing on the Wye river, would play catch in the yard, have foot races, and somehow they found the means to take us to Ocean City for a week every summer. Sometimes we would all pile into the station wagon and drive up to Pennsylvania for apples and then see if we could get lost on the trip back home.

Sometimes when riding through the Watershed and he would say, did you hear that? I’m sure that was the elusive Ookabadooka bird! Can you see it? I don’t know how many years we tried to find that darn bird.

Once when Dad was driving the family across the Warren Road bridge, the boys and I were playing in the backseat trying to hold our breath until we reached the other side. He must have known this, because he started driving slower and slower and slower. When we finally burst! he LAUGHED so hard.
Hearing that man’s laughter was an marvelous experience, you to HAD to laugh, it made you feel good. Being with Daddy made you happy.

One of our favorite memories was when Dad would read aloud to us. We would sit at his feet and hang on every word of the story. He was a marvelous storyteller. Mom would be sitting on the couch doing cross-stitch. We spent countless evenings that way. I’m sure it’s one of the reasons we all enjoy reading today.

Dad taught us the importance of doing your best at whatever it is you are doing. He said even if you are going to dig ditches, then you be the best ditch digger there is.

He taught us to take responsibility seriously and do what you say you are going to do. One time there was a heavy snow, the kind that would probably keep most people home from work. Dad got his shovel and dug out his car, he dug out the driveway, then he dug out Stansbury Mill Road, until he could get to Jarrettsville Pike which had been cleared, to go to work at Western Electric. His work ethic would put a whole lot of people to shame.

Dad was generous. As a newlywed he had his sister come live with him and mom because life on the farm had gotten pretty tough. He opened his house to his sister-in-law Mary and stepped in when she was in trouble. When his mother-in-law was dying of cancer she spent the last year of her life in his home. If you needed something he was there, no questions except for "how can I help."

But don’t mess with his family. Oh the stories of Dad standing up for a family member are many. There’s a reason people said, “Don’t mess with Ted” My brothers and I got to see Dad in action once and it is one of our favorite stories.

Our family took a trip across the United States. Dad spent 3 weeks driving us to California and back. I am so grateful for that adventure. We were just kids between 7 and 12 I think. Well, we were spending the night in a little one room Motor Lodge in Oklahoma City. It was late and we were all tucked in when we heard this noise at the door. Someone was trying to come in the door! We were all sitting up in bed looking from one to the other, terrified. Dad jumped out of bed and grabbed a billy club he brought with him for protection. He raced across to the front window which was floor to ceiling and pulled back the curtain. Picture Dad in his white Tshirt and tighty whities - He points to the man - he points to the billy club - then he cracks the billy club into his hand. That guy fled! Turns out he was a trucker who someone had given a key to steal a free night sleep, but heaven help him if he had made it through the door.

In addition to Daddy’s limitless capacity for love, strong work ethic, generous nature, and kindness, that man had a sense of humor! He enjoyed making people laugh and especially enjoyed embarrassing his family. He could be heard while at the checkout line in the grocery store to tell mom loudly “So when is your husband coming home?” The first night Richard came to pick me up for a date he told him, “Well you gotta get her home by 10 because that’s when Bill is coming over” If the boys brought a girl home and Dad knew a song with their name, you can bet he would just belt it out for them. I think Daniel may have been 5 when Dad first started asking if he had a girlfriend yet.

And then there was his love of singing. He instilled in us a love for Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, the Kingston Trio and countless other original country and folk artists. Many were the times we would be in the car and Dad and Mom would be singing and we just had to join right in. It’s a legacy we all enjoy and share with our children. There wasn’t a time that we were all together that the family didn’t have a sing a long and listening to the grandkids singing these old favorites with their Pop-Pop is a memory I will cherish forever.

Our Dad was a man with a big heart, a winning grin, and an infectious laugh. But my favorite feature was his eyes. Man were they blue! But more than being this amazing blue they would twinkle. And they had these deep laugh lines. When I was little used to sit in front of the mirror and try to squeeze the edges of my eyes together to make them like Daddy’s because I knew that meant you were happy. I’m happy to say I take pride in every one I’ve earned.


The final thought I would like to leave you with today is this. It’s an expression that sums up the unique humor of this incredible country boy in just one phrase and I encourage all of you to use it on some occasion, and think of him. When someone asks you “How are you doing?” answer with my Daddy’s favorite response: Fine as Frog’s hair! And if they say what? Reply “Have you ever Seen frog’s hair?”

Thank you.