OBITUARY

Leonard Norman Gibbons

3 July, 19231 April, 2021
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Leonard Gibbons born 3 July 1923 in Putney, London, England and passed away on Thursday, 1 April 2021 in Calgary, Alberta.

He is lovingly remembered and will be deeply missed by his beloved Vilma Matthews; her brothers Patrick, Percival (Marilyn) and Eugene (Usha), sisters Greta and Beulah (Patras) and nephews Sonna, Oswald, Gregory, Clinton (mom Christie) and Eddie, and nieces Jennifer (mom Gloria), Avril, Rachel, Rebecca and Olga. His son Brian (Karan), and Brian’s mom Dawn Gibbons. His daughter Carole Tolputt (Godfrey) in England. His nephew John Wren (Rosalind) and their families Gavin, Steven (Alison) and daughter Eleanor also in England. His very good friends Jim Long, Keith Cornelius, Bill Hawthorn, Wayne Cooper and Peter Crook in England. He will be lovingly remembered by his grandchildren, Taylor, Karen and Joanna and his three great grandchildren Evie, Lola, Willoby. Len was predeceased by his granddaughter Kelsey Gibbons and his son Andre (Bims) Gibbons.

A Private Celebration of Leonard’s life will be held at Foster’s Garden Chapel, 3220 – 4 Street N.W., Calgary, Alberta (across from Queen’s Park Cemetery) on April 10, 2021 at 2:00 pm. Those wishing to attend the service virtually may contact the funeral home for further details.

Since the current situation facing the world there is a need for donations everywhere, therefore anyone interested in making a memorial donation in Leonard Gibbon’s name may donate to your favourite charity.

Services

No public services are scheduled at this time. Receive a notification when services are updated.

Memories

Leonard Norman Gibbons

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Wendie *Elviss) KryaK

10 April 2021

Len and I worked at Canadian Superior Oil in the late 70's. Over several conversations, we realized that we'd gone to school in Putney, London, England. In fact his boys school was just over the stone fence from Putney High Girls school where I went when Dad was stationed overseas after the war.
I loved his dry wit, and he and I would swap insults and laughter, which made my day.
He was a remarkable man, and I felt a genuine loss when I changed companies, and had to leave him behind.