OBITUARY

Raymond Leroy Dudden

12 July, 192421 June, 2018

Raymond Leroy Dudden, age 94, passed away on June 21, 2018 from complications of a stroke in Edinburg, TX where he has resided for the past two years. Raymond was born July 12, 1924 in Venango, Nebraska, to the late Barney and Belle Dudden. He is preceded in death by his brothers, Garrett B. Dudden and Orville J. Dudden; his sisters, Alis Bellairs and Berdena Sattler; and survived by his sister, Christine Rosenbach. Raymond is survived by most of his 15 nieces and nephews and their many children.

He is also preceded in death by his wife Patricia Hubbard Dudden (2002) and his wife Marilyn Darlington (Van Demon) Dudden (1962) and his two sons, Cary M. Dudden (1975) and Fredrick I. Dudden (2012). He is survived by his three grandchildren, Laura M. Dudden, her son Julian, of Golden, CO; Philip Dudden, his two children, Skyla and River, and wife, Casey, of Northglen, CO; and Amber Dudden and her three children; and his sons’ wives, Rosalind Farnam Dudden, Pat Allburn Dudden, and Tony Dudden Schwartz.

Raymond served in World War II, first as a Merchant Marine and then as a member of the Army of Occupation in Japan and China. He was a proud veteran and participated in American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) events.

Raymond lived in the Denver area from the 60s while farming in the summer in Nebraska and supervising harvest crews on the Great Plains. From the 1970s, he farmed in the Champion and Imperial areas of Nebraska. In 2002 he moved to Texas while still going to Nebraska to work on his nephews’ farms in the Venango area in the summer. He was valued part of a large family that keep in touch in the Venango area with family celebrations.

Memorials for Raymond will be held at 1:30 pm on April 27, 2019 at Mount Lindo and on Memorial Day, May 27, at the Venango, NE, cemetery. Contact Rosalind or Laura Dudden for more information. (roz@rozfarnam.info; lauradudden@hotmail.com)

In lieu of flowers, please donate to the American Legion Post #270 in Venango, NE. Send donations to Dave Deden, 29794 County Road 6, Venango, NE 69168. Checks would be made out to the American Legion Post #270.

Memories

Raymond Leroy Dudden

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Rosalind Farnam

25 May 2019

This is a picture of Raymond in a bowling shirt. Kristi said he owned a bowling alley at one time. Also he owned a vending machine company in the 70s where Fred and other cousins worked. Fred had this picture on his Facebook page along with this story:
From January 5, 2012 ·
I woke up dreaming of spam and eggs today.
My father loved spam and we ate it whenever he cooked. Fried spam and eggs; spam omelets; span gravy on toast; fried spam sandwiches; I swear he bought it by the case.
When we got our first blender in 1960, he was ecstatic and his first breakfast was making scrambled eggs by tossing into the blender whole eggs still in the shell. I still remember him trying to convince us that the crunchy, gritty bits of shell would make us healthier. But he never fixed that dish again.
He is 87 and he still works on the farm running the tractor during summers. He's in better health than I am!

Rosalind Farnam

7 May 2019

Raymond and his immediate family were honored to have four guests at his internment on April 27 at Olinger Mount Lindo Cemetary where we laid Raymond to rest next to his second wife, Pat. Sorry this picture is out of focus. We were joined by Kristi Williams, Vel Naugle, and Jan Meyers, Raymond's nieces, and Kristi's husband, Ken. When asked, they all shared remembrances of Raymond and their interactions with him as children. It was very kind of them to come and remember Raymond. Afterwards, we adjourned to our home in Golden for refreshments. Ken and Kristi shared some movies of the Dudden family that they have been preserving.

The next memories contain four other pictures of the ceremony and place where Raymond has been laid to rest. As announced, we are also placing part of Raymond's ashes next to his first wife, Lyn, and his sons, Fred and Cary at the cemetery in Venango, Nebraska, on May 27th at 1:30 pm.

Rosalind Farnam

7 May 2019

The internment ceremony took place in front of the open crypt which had a green curtain in front of it. During the ceremony we moved the ashes from table to the crypt behind the curtain. The cover of the crypt with his name on it is on the floor below.

Rosalind Farnam

7 May 2019

This is the urn we prepared with part of Raymond's ashes. We attached buttons from his service uniform which we actually had until about 15 years ago. We had to toss it due to moths but kept the button and arm patch. We are using the Patch on the Urn we are burying in Venango.

Rosalind Farnam

7 May 2019

This is a picture of Raymond's side of the crypt.

Rosalind Farnam

7 May 2019

Finally, here is a photo of the inscription on Pat's side of the crypt so Janice, Pat's niece, and Verne, her husband can see it.

Rosalind Farnam

7 May 2019

To continue, this is a close up of the first combine. It is a family oral history that this lady is Raymond's sister, Berdena Dudden Stattler. This might work as she would have been in her late teens in the late 30s. Neat!

Rosalind Farnam

7 May 2019

To continue Barney's story about Raymond, here's a picture of a combine crew from the late 30s we think that Raymond's son Fred owned. Upon examination you can see that the first combine has a lady driver and is "self-propelling." Not sure that is the right word. The other combines are being pulled by tractors. They might be "real" combines as the definition of a combine is a harvester that "combines" the operations of reaping, threshing, and winnowing.

Vernon and Janice Bolz

26 April 2019

Uncle Raymond was the kindest person we have ever known. We have lots of fond memories of him and so does our children and grandchildren.

Rosalind Farnam Dudden

23 April 2019

From Barney Deden,
Part 2:
I ran the wheat field operation for Raymond up through the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma and on through Kansas. We reached Venango about July 15th and I did not continue North from there because I was needed on our farm. I enjoyed the work but certainly did not like the absence of a shower at the end of the day. A "splash bath" from a basin of water is not very refreshing. Fred and Cary made the trip with us and stayed in the new trailer home Raymond and Pat pulled along with the crew. They spent most of their time scheduling work as we moved North. I sometimes would not see Raymond for as much as two weeks but I remember that I had 5 pretty good men working for me and we had few problems, none of which we could not correct. Some good memories of an early time in my life.

From the Family