OBITUARIO

Russell Orville Brown

7 marzo , 193017 mayo , 2020
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Russell Orville Brown, age 90, was born March 7, 1930 in Knoxville, TN to Herman A. & Helen E. Russell Brown. He passed away at his home Sunday, May 17, 2020. A Navy Veteran, and 1954 University of Tennessee Electrical Engineering graduate, Russell worked for Schlumberger Well Service for over 26 years, retiring as Senior Sales Engineer for their Southeast Division. He was preceded in death by his parents; his son, Douglas S. Brown; his daughter-in-law, Joy Sistrunk Brown; his sister, Barbara Cheek and brother, Thomas Brown. Russell is survived by his two sons, Edward A. Brown and wife, Virginia (Savannah, GA), D. Russell Brown and wife, Melba (Keller, TX); daughter, Patricia E. Davis and husband, Robert (Sherman, TX); step-son, John Ratcliff and wife, Mary (Shreveport, LA); step-daughter, Beth Batey (San Antonio, TX); near daughter-in-law, Cris Noll (Morton Grove, IL); sister-in-law, Sandra & husband, Ed Turner (Knoxville). His many grandchildren/step-grandchildren include: Hope & husband, Dan Owen (Knoxville), Matthew R. Brown (Ft. Worth, TX), Allison & husband, Brandon Weddle (Princeton, TX), Meredith & husband, Sam Shapiro (Los Angeles, CA), Bethany Simons (San Francisco, CA), Mitchell, Mary Frances & Walker Ratcliff (all of Shreveport, LA), Jordan & wife, Briana Batey (McMinnville, OR), Kazdan & wife, Jenna Batey (Hill AFB, Layton, UT), Kylee & husband, Jason Haueter (Rexburg, ID), McKenzee, Eathan & Gracee Batey (all of San Antonio, TX). His great/step-great-grandchildren include: David William Owen (Knoxville, TN), Brylee & Logan Weddle (Princeton, TX), Liam, Nixon & Cohen Batey (McMinnville, OR), & Logan Lynn Powell, Murphee & Riggins Batey (Hill AFG, Layton, UT). Russell's very dear nieces and nephews, Janis & husband, Bob Crye, Vicki Cheek, Steve & wife, Brenda Brown, and Michael & wife, Paula Brown, all of Knoxville. The family will receive friends from 9:00am – 10:45am Monday, June 1st at Berry Lynnhurst Funeral Home with a 11:00am graveside service to follow in Lynnhurst Cemetery. Pallbearers are Ed Brown, D. Russ Brown, Matthew Brown, Dan Owen, Steve Brown, and Michael Brown.

Servicios

  • Visitation

    lunes, 1 junio , 2020

  • Graveside Service

    lunes, 1 junio , 2020

Recuerdos

Russell Orville Brown

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Biografía

Russell Orville Brown was a modest man, quiet and observant in his ways. He was trustworthy and traditional in his approach to his life and in his relationships. He was tough-minded with the kind of “stick to it” attitude that earned the respect of all who knew him. He was also a man who was meticulous, carefully disciplined, and orderly in virtually everything he undertook. Realistic about life, he was always ready, prepared to take on responsibility.

      Russell was born on March 7, 1930 at Knoxville General Hospital in Knoxville, Tennessee. His parents were Herman and Helen Brown. Russell was raised in Knoxville, Tennessee. He was brought up to be self-confident and dependable. These were traits that would serve him well throughout his life.

Growing up in the Brown household was a bit different than most homes. There were good times to be had, but just as often there were a fair share of challenges as well. However, Russell was able to work through the usual family problems when they appeared, and he was constantly involved in helping around the home. Russell was raised with two siblings. He had one younger sister, Barbara and one younger brother, Tommy. Russell and his siblings may have had the typical rivalries while growing up but Russell was always consistently loyal to his family.

As a young child, Russell was never someone who needed to be the center of attention. He wasn’t pushy and never forced his way into games or other activities. Russell developed a variety of interests and the things he enjoyed doing, he did well. He was always curious about the world around him and was often eager to explore it. He was a Cub Scout, and later became a Den Chief of Cub Pack #3205 of Knoxville, TN. Progressing to Boy Scouts, he attained the rank of Life Scout, while being a Senior Patrol Leader in Troop #9 of Knoxville, TN. In his spare time he liked hiking, playing with his friends and cousins and going to a movie. Russell's childhood activities were mostly work related and included having a paper route, carrying coal, caddying at Whittle Springs Golf Club, working at a gas station, the A&P Grocery store as a bag boy, and later in their meat market. He also worked at the UT Agricultural Farm in their Experimental Dept. & sold soft drinks in the stands at University of Tennessee football games. However, what Russell enjoyed most was simply playing and spending time with his many friends and family.

While his teachers and even his friends generally thought of Russell as being a serious person, he managed to have a pretty good time in high school as he made that critical transition from adolescence to adulthood. He graduated from Knoxville High School in 1948. While attending he was involved in the ROTC and a member of the ROTC Glee Club, Choir, and the HI-Y, Hiking and French Clubs. He was also a member of one of the all boy social clubs, the "Dukes". It was during his senior year, and with a bit of persuasion from Bruce Shuler, that Russell joined the US Naval Reserves. Bruce had discovered that they would receive their training during a 10 week "Baby Cruise" that summer. So, with friend Lonnie Brown, they departed on the USS Donner LSD-20 for the Mediterranean, and what he thought would be his one chance to “see the world”. Russell was a very logical person who enjoyed learning about factual information. Using his exceptional memory, he was able to learn much through observation. Russell always seemed to have a command of the facts and was able to make it seem as though he could easily master any problem that might be presented to him.

College life brought with it a new set of challenges, but Russell handled them well. At first, he attended college through the Co-op Program, working alternate quarters at the KUB Engineering Dept. After the Korean War, he was able to complete college on the GI Bill. He pledged with Delta Tau Delta Fraternity in 1949, and worked part-time, after school, drafting at the Knox County Courthouse Tax Office. Additionally, while attending UT, he worked as a USPS Mail Sorter during Christmas recess, set up for Student Center meetings after his school classes, and lastly was a Fire Guard. Being a critical thinker who always remained intellectually independent, Russell was able to focus on the task at hand in order to complete his class work. The ability to efficiently complete the task at hand was a skill that served Russell well during his college experience. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Tennessee in 1954.

Always considered to be a solid friend, Russell was fortunate to have numerous acquaintances and several very close friends during his life. Since he disliked making generalizations about people and preferred to draw his own conclusions based on direct observation, Russell was able to see beneath the surface of relationships and became a true friend to those who knew him. He was committed to his friends and valued the trust they placed in him. It was not uncommon for Russell to go beyond the call of duty for others, and friends frequently sought him out for advice because he had a knack for coming up with practical solutions to any type of dilemma. While growing up, some of his best friends were fellow "Dukes": Ken McMahan (best man at his wedding), Jim McCorkle, Bob Danner, Dewey Peters, Ora Wells, Jim Huff, Bob Lykens, and John Montgomery. Also, Lester Madison, Lonnie Brown, Bruce Shuler, Bill Lawhon; cousins, Bob Wyrick, Billy Popejoy, & Actor, John Cullum. Later in life, he became friends with many from his work, church and scout life.

On December 23, 1950, Russell exchanged wedding vows with Ellen Sample at the Central Methodist Church, of Knoxville, TN. Together, while pursuing his career with Schlumberger with moves to Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi and Louisiana, they raised their four children: Ed, Russ, Pat and Doug. Though this marriage came to an end in 1974, Russell again exchanged wedding vows with Elizabeth “Liz” Reddit at Grace United Methodist Church in Natchez, MS on February 19, 1977. This union also added two additional children from Liz’s previous marriage. Though this union also came to an end, Russell always remained close to the step-children and became “Grandpa Russ” to their children. Russell held endearing, traditional values about marriage and family life, and though the stresses of life took their toll on his family life, he constantly provided for them, and never turned his back for any of them who had a need.

Russell applied the same traditional values by which he was raised to how he raised his children. He was a good parent to them, always firm yet fair in his dealings. He would always listen carefully and think things through before he acted, even when it was an adverse situation. Russell was also a walking schedule, always seeming to know what everyone in the family needed to do, where they needed to be and when they needed to be there. Russell was blessed with four children from his marriage to Ellen, three sons, Ed, Russ and Doug and one daughter, Pat; and from his marriage to Liz, one step-son, John Ratcliff and one step-daughter, Beth Ratcliff. He was also blessed with two grandchildren and twelve step-grandchildren, Hope & Matthew Brown, Ali Davis, Meredith & Bethany Simons, Mitchell, Mary Frances & Walker Ratcliff, and Jordan, Kazdan, McKenzee, Kylee, Eathan, & Gracee Batey, and
nine great/step-great-grandchildren.

Russell greatly enjoyed what he did for a living. He was a hard worker who expected the same in return from his co-workers. He was skilled at working effectively in small groups and in one-on-one situations as well as handling solo assignments efficiently. Russell enjoyed dealing with concrete ideas and could penetrate any amount of fuzzy information to reach the essential facts. Always able to attend to the task at hand, Russell was excellent at meeting deadlines. He was an efficient worker, one who paid careful attention to detail, allowing sufficient time to complete one task before moving on to the next. His primary occupation was as a log analyst, and then sales engineer. While in sales, he was involved in many Oil Invitational Golf Tournaments and Crawfish/Shrimp Boils. In addition, he became the acting Manager when the Managers took their yearly month long vacations. He was employed for 30 years with Schlumberger and in this time wrote, published and presented the paper, "Fracture Identification Log Use in Cretaceous of N. Louisiana and Mississippi" (1978). He also co-wrote, published and presented the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) 9269 Paper, "Predicting the Orientation of the Hydraulically Created Fractures in the Cotton Valley Formation of East Texas" (1980). Russell worked hard to be a team player, doing what was necessary in order to get the job done.

Russell was a proud Navy veteran. He was an Electronics Technician as a Radio Repairman on the USS Donner LSD-20 the summer of 1948, then the USS White Marsh LSD-8 from 1950-1952. Russell saw action for two years during the Korean Conflict. During his time in the Navy, he was able to see things unimaginable to him. His fondest memories were of visiting the Parthenon in Greece, the French Foreign Legion headquarters in Algeria and Monte Carlo. Traveling north from Bermuda to Greenland, he received a certificate for crossing the Arctic Circle into the Navy’s “Northern Domain of the Polar Bear” on June 9, 1951. He also received praise for his valor, including being awarded a letter of commendation for the USS White Marsh's Fire & Rescue Assistance. This assistance was rendered to the USS Valcour AVP-55, on May 14, 1951, off the coast of Norfolk, VA, after it's collision with the SS Thomas B Tracy. He was discharged March 5, 1952 with the rank of Electronics Technician Seaman. A literal thinker who possessed a calm exterior, Russell seemed to enjoy the routines set forth by the military. His result-oriented approach to things made him committed to the job, and he understood well his role in serving his country.

Russell liked to experience things first-hand as well as learn about them. This trait carried over into his hobbies, where he was very methodical in how he organized his activities and categorized things. Since he enjoyed his private time, Russell always tried to allocate a specific time for working on his hobbies. His favorite pursuits were wood-working (musical church, doll house), model building (airplanes); coin collecting; genealogy; rock hunting (agates, petrified wood); reading (voracious!); cross word puzzles; and playing golf. Russell was content to enjoy his hobbies alone but was also willing to share his interests with others.

Russell found pleasure in sports. Being a person who was comfortable making win/lose decisions throughout life, he could appreciate that athletes made those types of decisions in sports. He applauded those who won, and he enjoyed the statistical data and sports facts and could find himself wrapped up in those details. He would watch his favorite sporting events whenever he got the opportunity. Tops on his list were any University of Tennessee games; College and Pro Football; and Golf.

Many organizations were grateful to have Russell as a member, since he always brought with him a “stick to it” attitude and a high degree of common sense. Using straightforward methods to successfully complete the job, Russell was a great planner who was incredibly well organized. It seemed that he was able to schedule any event or activity with ease. He always seemed to know exactly what needed to be done. Throughout his years, Russell was a member of the Boy Scouts, Delta Tau Delta Fraternity, Society of Professional Well Log Analysts, and American Institute of Mining Engineers.

Russell was a man who was dedicated and devoted to his faith. He was a member of the United Methodist Church. During that time, he served on various church committees, and was involved with the local and regional Boy Scouts.

Russell sought out practical solutions, not individual recognition. He was always grounded and objective, feeling a strong sense of responsibility for taking care of what needed to be done. This selfless attitude earned Russell many accolades for his efforts and achievements. Some of his most prestigious awards included Schlumberger's 1967 Gold Letter Award (for quality logs and interpretation for John Goodson at Humble Oil Co); 1968 Wildcatter's Award (for “conscientious log evaluation” that discovered the first commercial James Lime oil production in South Arkansas through Triad Drilling Corp.); & 1976 Wildcatter's Award (for interpretation of logs and Repeat Formation Tester data that converted a dry hole into a “very good Wilcox well” for Munoco’s #1 Angelina; Bee Brake Field; Concordia, LA).

Russell enjoyed taking vacations back to Knoxville, TN for yearly family visits and trips to the Smoky Mountains. He also enjoyed his yearly vacation time with family in Daytona Beach, FL. Traveling with Russell appeared effortless. He packed the car, drove, had meals ready for the road side picnic stops, & comic books on hand for travel entertainment. Later he enjoyed traveling in his RV. He enjoyed researching all of his examined options and applying cost-effective planning techniques. Favorite vacations include a trip to Niagara Falls with son, Doug, and any trip to see family, children or grandchildren.

When Russell’s retirement finally arrived in 1985 from Schlumberger, he was well prepared. He always trusted and placed value in what was logical and in the things he knew, so he was very confident in planning his retirement. He had begun the process early and had his retirement all laid out well in advance. In retirement, he found new pleasure in doing contract work for oil entities such as Victor P. Smith & Associates & Greer Energy in Shreveport, LA. He later formed his own company, ROBCO Investments, Inc, and became a landlord of many properties in Shreveport, LA.

After hanging up all his work shingles, Russell became intrigued and fascinated with tracing his family line. Genealogy became his new passion. Discoveries, like his great-great-grandfather, Joseph Allison Brown’s move from Canada to Louisville, TN….this due to his inheriting his brother-in-law’s estate, Maple Grove, still operating in Knoxville as the Maple Grove Inn/Estate; or his great-grandfather, John Thomas Brown’s Civil War heroic exploit…sneaking through enemy lines, to deliver a note from General Grant to General Burnside, during the siege of Knoxville; or his great-grandfather, Calvin W Russell, who heading home from the Confederate Cahaba prison, survived the steamer ship “Sultana” explosion; were some of his fascinating family finds that filled him with awe. Even in retirement, Russell continued to stay in touch with his old friends and through his genealogy research, connected with many family members.

In 2007, his new retirement life involved a move from Shreveport, LA to Knoxville, TN. This allowed him to be closer to his sister, and provide a home for granddaughter, Hope, who was starting her freshmen year at the University of Tennessee. A few of the special moments shared are remembered by Hope and her husband Dan. Hope: “The best was the weekend he showed me around Knoxville after I moved here. He showed me where he grew up and what has changed over time. He took me to the Smoky’s, and we ate at his favorite restaurants. I won’t ever forget him moving to Knoxville to help me out. I also really loved that he lived to see his great-grandson, David William Owen. Growing up, seeing Granddaddy in Shreveport was just a stop on the way to more family, but these last ten years, with him in Knoxville, were really special. I got to know him and his kindness, his encouragement and his stories. I will miss him, and wish I had more time, but I will never forget the last ten years I had.”

Dan: “My favorite memory of Granddaddy was when he taught me how to change a tire. He sat with me the whole time, and patiently talked me through it. He always trusted me with tasks around the house, telling me I had a good head on my shoulders. His encouragement is something I will miss the most. On a side note, he weekly told me about the first time he had a taco! And I miss that, too.”

Russell Orville Brown passed away on May 17, 2020 at at his home in Knoxville, Tennessee. Russell died instantly from cardiac arrest. He is survived by his children, Ed, Russ, and Pat; step-children, John and Beth; grandchildren, Hope and Matt and step-grandchildren, Ali, Meredith, Bethany, Mitchell, Mary Frances, Walker, Jordan, Kazdan, McKenzee, Kylee, Eathan and Gracee; & 9 great/step-great-grandchildren, David, Brylee, Logan, Liam, Nixon, Cohen, Logan Lynn, Murphee and Riggins. Services were held June 1, 2020, at Berry Lynnhurst Funeral Home. Russell was laid to rest in Lynnhurst Cemetery in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Commitment is a key word that can be used to describe the life of Russell Orville Brown. He was committed to living the life of a good man who was both practical and trustworthy. He was committed to the traditional values that he upheld his entire life. He committed himself to being a hard worker who expected the same effort in return from those around him. Most of all, he was committed to those he knew and loved.

We love you Dad, Granddad, Grandpa "Russ" and miss you dearly - Your Family