OBITUARY

Laurel B. Headley

April 4, 1939November 30, 2018

Laurel B. Headley was born on April 4, 1939 in Lansing, Michigan and died on November 30, 2018. She is survived by her husband John; her three children, Carrie Williams, Steven Headley (Beth), and Linda Headley; her five grandchildren, Aaron Williams, Christine Williams, Elizabeth Pratt, Jake Headley, Noah Headley, and Matthew Headley; and her brother, Fred Musolf. Her parents, Otto and Lola Musolf, and her sister, Mildred Vietzke, have gone before her.

Laurel lived a long, happy life, most of it alongside her best friend, closest confidant, and husband, John. Married more than 60 years, the two of them crafted a wonderful existence, filled with family, friends, and fun. Laurel and John had a true partnership—they worked together, parented together, traveled together, and played together. Even through Laurel’s long battle with cancer, they always found something to be thankful for and laugh about. Looking for meaning in every situation, finding joy in the simplest things, seeing the good in others—that’s what they did best. As John often said, Laurel (whom he affectionately called “Toots”) had beauty of great depth. She was loving, thoughtful, kind, supportive, and she made him the very best person he could possibly be.

As a mother, Laurel was engaged, loving, and always saw the best in her children. She had a way of knowing when they needed support and encouragement as opposed to a lecture or reprimand. Laurel skillfully balanced patience and kindness with a quiet toughness and resolve. In a generation where mothers faced many daily challenges, she always found time to spend with her kids. She skied, snowmobiled, golfed, fished, hiked, and even rock climbed. In the early years, it was not uncommon to find Laurel in the backyard playing catch, leading a Brownie or Cub Scout meeting, or swimming in the pool. She had a fierce evil eye, which she wielded on her children when they misbehaved (especially in church), but it made far fewer appearances than her frequent and gentle smile, which drew people in and reflected her love of life and those around her. That smile—which greeted her children upon every visit—never faded, even during her most difficult days.

Laurel especially cherished her grandchildren, who will fondly remember her welcoming lap, warm embrace, and willingness to play matchbox cars, make-believe, board games—whatever they enjoyed doing most. She taught them to sew, bake, play cards, and paint, and attended their many concerts, plays, and soccer, lacrosse, football, volleyball, and basketball games. Laurel made her grandkids more food than they could ever eat and gave them more love and support than they would ever need. Laurel was generous with her time and talents, always looking for ways to make life better for others. After the kids were in school, she went work for Central United Methodist Church, the United Methodist District Superintendent, and the Crop Office. She also volunteered in school classrooms, coordinated a food pantry, went on many mission trips, and served on nearly every church committee. This work demonstrated how much she loved helping others in any possible way.

In addition to serving others, Laurel loved baking, sewing, knitting, painting, skiing, and reading. But most of all she loved golf. It wasn’t just a hobby; it was a passion. She won two league championships and had two holes in one, both on the same hole at Highland Hills Golf Course. There are only two things her family knew she disliked: liver and her middle name (it’s Beatrice!). Although Laurel didn’t lead a flashy life, she made a deep and lasting impression on everyone who knew her. Unfailingly kind and friendly, she left the people she met happier for the time that they spent with her. She will be sorely missed.

The family will receive visitors December 14 from 6:00-8:00 pm at Gorsline Runciman Funeral Homes, DeWitt Chapel. Memorial Service will take place at 11:00 am December 15 with visitation one hour prior at the funeral home.

In lieu of flowers, please send donations to Gunnisonville United Methodist Church (2031 Clark Road, Bath, MI 48808 Attn: Joyce Barker), the Sparrow Clinton Foundation for the Food Pantry (805 S. Oakland Street, St. Johns, MI 48879) or Sparrow Hospice (c/o Sparrow Foundation, 1322 E, Michigan Avenue, Suite 204, Lansing, MI 48912, note that it’s for Sparrow Hospice in memory of Laurel Headley).

  • DONATIONS

  • Gunnisonville United Methodist Church
  • Sparrow Clinton Foundation Food Pantry
  • Sparrow Hospice

Services

14 December

Visitation

6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Gorsline Runciman Funeral Homes

205 E. Washington
DeWitt, Michigan 48820

15 December

Visitation

10:00 am - 11:00 am

Gorsline Runciman Funeral Homes

205 E. Washington
DeWitt, Michigan 48820

15 December

Celebration of Life

11:00 am

Gorsline Runciman Funeral Homes

205 E. Washington
DeWitt, Michigan 48820

REMEMBERING

Laurel B. Headley

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Pat Mort

December 10, 2018

I knew Laurel at Central United Methodist Church, where she was always kind, shining, gentle and loving. Her memories will be with us forever.

Peggy Coleman

December 8, 2018

Laurel was a regular customer of mine at quality dairy. coffee and a sour cream chocolate donut cut in half to share with her husband John . She loved hugs and was always smiling. It brightened my day to see her and get a hug. She will be greatly missed

Jeff Chastain

December 7, 2018

There are few people in this world who almost seem to glow with goodness. Aunt Laurel was one of them.

Alice Jean & Wayne Loomis

December 7, 2018

To John and Family,
We are so sorry for your loss Laurel was such a great lady and will be missed so much by all her friends and family, she also was such a strong person and gave us all hope,
Sincerely Alice Jean and Wayne Loomis

FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY

Biography

Laurel B. Headley was born on April 4, 1939 in Lansing, Michigan and died on November 30, 2018. She is survived by her husband John; her three children, Carrie Williams, Steven Headley (Beth), and Linda Headley; her five grandchildren, Aaron Williams, Christine Williams, Elizabeth Pratt, Jake Headley, Noah Headley, and Matthew Headley; and her brother, Fred Musolf. Her parents, Otto and Lola Musolf, and her sister, Mildred Vietzke, have gone before her.

Laurel lived a long, happy life, most of it alongside her best friend, closest confidant, and husband, John. Married more than 60 years, the two of them crafted a wonderful existence, filled with family, friends, and fun. Laurel and John had a true partnership—they worked together, parented together, traveled together, and played together. Even through Laurel’s long battle with cancer, they always found something to be thankful for and laugh about. Looking for meaning in every situation, finding joy in the simplest things, seeing the good in others—that’s what they did best. As John often said, Laurel (whom he affectionately called “Toots”) had beauty of great depth. She was loving, thoughtful, kind, supportive, and she made him the very best person he could possibly be.

As a mother, Laurel was engaged, loving, and always saw the best in her children. She had a way of knowing when they needed support and encouragement as opposed to a lecture or reprimand. Laurel skillfully balanced patience and kindness with a quiet toughness and resolve. In a generation where mothers faced many daily challenges, she always found time to spend with her kids. She skied, snowmobiled, golfed, fished, hiked, and even rock climbed. In the early years, it was not uncommon to find Laurel in the backyard playing catch, leading a Brownie or Cub Scout meeting, or swimming in the pool. She had a fierce evil eye, which she wielded on her children when they misbehaved (especially in church), but it made far fewer appearances than her frequent and gentle smile, which drew people in and reflected her love of life and those around her. That smile—which greeted her children upon every visit—never faded, even during her most difficult days.

Laurel especially cherished her grandchildren, who will fondly remember her welcoming lap, warm embrace, and willingness to play matchbox cars, make-believe, board games—whatever they enjoyed doing most. She taught them to sew, bake, play cards, and paint, and attended their many concerts, plays, and soccer, lacrosse, football, volleyball, and basketball games. Laurel made her grandkids more food than they could ever eat and gave them more love and support than they would ever need.

Laurel was generous with her time and talents, always looking for ways to make life better for others. After the kids were in school, she went work for Central United Methodist Church, the United Methodist District Superintendent, and the Crop Office. She also volunteered in school classrooms, coordinated a food pantry, went on many mission trips, and served on nearly every church committee. This work demonstrated how much she loved helping others in any possible way.

In addition to serving others, Laurel loved baking, sewing, knitting, painting, skiing, and reading. But most of all she loved golf. It wasn’t just a hobby; it was a passion. She won two league championships and had two holes in one, both on the same hole at Highland Hills Golf Course. There are only two things her family knew she disliked: liver and her middle name (it’s Beatrice!).