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Memorial Park Funeral Home & Cemetery

13313 North Kelley, Oklahoma City, OK

OBITUARY

Jimmie Earl Stravlo

July 9, 1933February 29, 2020
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Jimmie Earl Stravlo, a lifelong resident of Oklahoma City, was born the second of two children to Fred Stravlo and his wife, Anna.

He graduated to his heavenly home on February 29, 2020, after fighting a brave battle with cancer. Jim faithfully served our country from 1953-1955 during the Korean Conflict. Jim attended Classen High School and continued to attend monthly luncheons with his classmates until the end of his life. He also attended Oklahoma University where he met and married his first love, Virginia McCroskey, on December 26, 1953.

From this union two children were born, Vicki Lynn and Peter Todd. Jim later abandoned bachelorhood when he discovered and courted a lovely teller at Quail Creek Bank. After a whirlwind romance in 1980, Jim and the great love of his life, Joyce Ann Trimmer, married on September 19, 1981. Jim followed his father, Fred, and his brother, Richard, into the brick mason trade. Later, his graduation from the School of Dale Carnegie led him to a long and successful career as a salesman with Westinghouse, A.B. Chance/Hubbell, and Pelco Products.

Throughout his storied career, he unselfishly encouraged, inspired and mentored many people who credit him with helping them in their own careers. Jim was a faithful believer in God and his favorite book was Jesus Calling, which he read every morning. He was also an avid golfer, he was always ready with a funny story or joke, and also loved playing Poker and Texas Hold-Em.

Jim is survived by his wife, Joyce Stravlo; daughter, Vicki Chapin (and Warren) of Tulsa; son, Peter Stravlo (and Peggy) of Denver, CO; grandson, Matthew Burdt (and Vanessa) of Oklahoma City; granddaughter, Teri Sloan (and Aaron) of Denver, CO; grandson, Nathan Schoonover, of Denver, CO; granddaughter, Jessica Lucas of Indianapolis, IN; and granddaughter, Alice Sconyers of Hot Springs, AR; as well as seven great-grandchildren, two great-great grandchildren; many nieces and nephews and a host of friends.

Jim was preceded in death by his mother, Anna Stravlo, his father, Fred Stravlo, and his brother, Richard Stravlo.

  • PALLBEARERS

  • Matt Burdt
  • Bob Magness
  • Jim Stengle
  • Monte Stutterheim
  • Scott Talley
  • Andy Trimmer
  • Dick Bevins
  • Henry Blott
  • Les Harness
  • Zack Hays
  • Phil Parduhn
  • Bobby Teel

Services

  • Visitation Wednesday, March 4, 2020
  • Celebration of Life Thursday, March 5, 2020

Memories

Jimmie Earl Stravlo

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Vicki Stravlo Chapin

March 26, 2020

Dad was a real worrier. When I started driving to Tulsa on the turnpike to see Mom, Dad would say "Call me when you get there." Back then calling long distance cost money. But "thrifty" Dad had a plan. When I got there I would have the operator make a direct call and I would ask for "Richard". When Dad answered and told the operator, "There's no Richard here. It must be a wrong number" - Voila! He knew I was safe and sound and he didn't pay a cent! In more recent years, with FREE cell phone calls and texts, we asked Dad to "Call or text us when you get home, Dad". The last time I heard those words from him he was in his hospital bed saying, through his oxygen mask, "Call me when you get there". I replied, "Dad, I'm just going to Edmond." He smiled with a twinkle in those blue eyes he repeated , "Call or text me anyway." So, of course, I did.
I think most of us would agree that Dad was a Master Story Teller and Relationship Builder, a true "people person". Dad's lifeline was being around other people. So it was natural that Dad wanted to see and talk to as many friends and relatives as possible in the last few weeks of his life. He fought an amazing fight against cancer for over two years and then, at the end, with pneumonia.
We lost count of the stream of people flowing through Dad's hospital and hospice rooms. The old stories being told and the raucous laughter were the best medicine Dad could have been given. He just wanted to hear your voice and tell you "I love you". As speaking became more difficult for him, with those loving blue eyes and sweet smile, he would take your hand and squeeze it tightly. Towards the end, Dad could still greet you or say good-bye with a big Thumbs Up.
I can hear Dad now, telling his stories in heaven and making people laugh. Well, Dad doesn't have to "call or text" us now. He's safely in his Forever Home in Heaven. You go Dad! See you soon!
THUMBS UP!!

Joyce Stravlo

March 7, 2020

There is so much more that Jim taught me about life, he loved to get out of bed each day, just to see what God had in store for him. He had the energy of the Energizer Bunny, and kept himself on the go most of the time, until he just had to sit down, then he was soon asleep in his chair. He just had to feel he had accomplished something in a days time, or he felt he was being lazy.

His laughter would fill a football stadium and he loved to laugh, when he got really tickled he would slap his hands on his legs and stomp his feet on the floor, because his whole body was laughing. His most common farewell to visitors was, be sure to call if we can help you with anything and he meant it.

Most of all though, was his capacity to love -- as with everything else in his life he loved with everything he had and asked only for your love in return. So Jimmie Earl Stravlo, you are moving on up, where all you will encounter is love and happiness, soak yourself in it for you have earned it.

Joyce Stravlo

March 7, 2020

As a teen he tested the waters with his parents to the inth degree, and finally got in trouble with a couple other boys for stealing a Case of Empty Pop Bottles, for which you could receive $.50 cents when you returned them to the grocery store. The police took him to the station and called his Mother, when she picked him up, she had a bag of his clothing packed and he was taken to Tulsa, OK., to spend the summer working with his Father, which wasn't so bad he thought but when Mother came to take him back for school, he was driven to Claremore, OK., and a year at the Military Academy. He loved it there and worked hard to keep his grades up and not get into any trouble, so he could go back home to graduate from Classen High School. His positive attitude made the most of this situation, and he learned many important life lessons because of it.

If ever a man was born to be a Father, Jim was it -- he absolutely adored his Daughter, Vicki and his son, Pete. They were his reason for existing in this ole world, from the day they were born, until the day he left this Earth, he was there cheering them on, saying anything was possible in life and they could do whatever they chose to with their lives. They both have a College Degrees and own and run their own business'.

Joyce Stravlo

March 7, 2020

Jim was the kindest, most considerate man I have ever known, he would always go the extra mile to help anyone and give them second and third chance's when needed.

He was raised modestly, mostly by his Mother, because his Dad was a brick mason and often worked on jobs which were out of Oklahoma City. But, he treasured his childhood and thought it was the happiest, most secure time of his life, because he trusted in his parents unconditional love, which made him feel safe. He was always an independent soul though, never allowing his mother to oversee his choice of clothing, therefore he was the only boy in class with a pair of riding pants and boots, and he never knew how many other boys envied him.

He was always TALKING in kindergarten class, one day the teacher asked him to bring his favorite pair of socks to school the next day, he was so excited, thinking they were going to play a new game. He hurried to school the next day, gave the socks to the teacher and she immediately took him to the corner, unfolded the socks, stuffed one in his MOUTH and then tied the other around his mouth to keep the first sock in place, and he was made to stay in the corner all of the class period. The teacher told him she was going to get some class time in, without him jabbering all the time, then when penny loafers first became the style he wanted a pair, but Mother thought he must have shoe laces or he could never keep them on his feet. He argued oh yes I can and besides you can put a penny in the front of them. Mother was sure he was telling a story, but they later shopped for them and he proved her to be incorrect.

Joyce Stravlo

March 7, 2020

Jim was the kindest, most considerate man I have ever known, he would always go the extra mile to help anyone and give them second and third chance's when needed.

He was raised modestly, mostly by his Mother, because his Dad was a brick mason and often worked on jobs which were out of Oklahoma City. But, he treasured his childhood and thought it was the happiest, most secure time of his life, because he trusted in his parents unconditional love, which made him feel safe. He was always an independent soul though, never allowing his mother to oversee his choice of clothing, therefore he was the only boy in class with a pair of riding pants and boots, and he never knew how many other boys envied him.

He was always TALKING in kindergarten class, one day the teacher asked him to bring his favorite pair of socks to school the next day, he was so excited, thinking they were going to play a new game. He hurried to school the next day, gave the socks to the teacher and she immediately took him to the corner, unfolded the socks, stuffed one in his MOUTH and then tied the other around his mouth to keep the first sock in place, and he was made to stay in the corner all of the class period. The teacher told him she was going to get some class time in, without him jabbering all the time, then When penny loafers first became the style he wanted a pair, but Mother thought he must have shoe laces or he could never keep them on his feet. He argued oh yes I can and besides you can put a penny in the front of them. Mother was sure he was telling a story, but they later shopped for them and he proved her to be incorrect.

Tyler Sconyers

March 7, 2020

It's so hard to select a single memory of Papa, looking back at everytime I was with you guys we were always busy going someplace fun. Being younger I didn't think of what could be learned from such an exemplary and selfless man.

I cherish every memory I have of him, he was comedic, charismatic and quite the charmer of hotel clerks!! We always asked Papa how many friends he had made in his endeavors to complete hotel check-ins.

Papa and Grammy purchased my first good guitar, about eight years ago for me and now I use it every week to play music in Hot Springs, AR., which makes people happy, just like Papa would have wanted me to do.

These memories will carry on with me until the end of my days. I hope to be half the man he was and I hope I can make him proud as he continues to watch over me and the rest of us until we meet again. (I love you too Grammy and I hope you are staying strong until I get there so I can be strong for you. I will see you soon.)

David Stapleton

March 7, 2020

I have only known Jim a little over a decade, he was quite a man, you never knew what to expect from him.

My very first Christmas with the family, Jim came out dressed in elf shorts and an elf hat for Christmas dinner. It was hilarious.

I am so proud to have known him and to have been accepted into the Stravlo family. He will truly be missed!!

Alyssa Murray

March 7, 2020

Thinking of all of the memories that Papa Jim and you gave us growing up, I believe the ones that stick out the most to me are the times he played dress up with Jessica and I, where he was usually wearing dresses and make up. Or having you guys feed us marshmallow circus peanuts while we acted like wild animals. Anything to keep us laughing. ❤️

I can rest assured knowing how much he loved us and how proud he was of us.

Alice Sconyers

March 7, 2020

This is really hard because some of the best memories in my life have Grandpa and Grandma in them. Starting with me finally being able to call him grandpa when they got married, to a really long trip from Texas all the way to Canada with my Sylvester the cat.
One of the next was my most wonderful 16th birthday party and getting my first car. The car one got a little hairy. Skiing Trips, Disney World, and the list keeps going and going.
The most important thing he did for me is be a constant part of my life and put up with me when I was a pain Granddaughter. Then just a few days ago when he told me how proud of me he was. It meant the world to me to hear that from him. I will miss him dearly.

Andy and Rose Trimmer

March 7, 2020

Every memory we have of Jim is a fond one and makes us smile or sometimes even laugh out loud.

Jim was a social butterfly that no matter where he went he would run into someone he knew. He worked but, didn't consider it working. It was more like going to see his friends on a daily basis. He went to a Nascar race with some guys. He said it wasn't his cup of tea. It was too loud for him to talk.

When we would go out to eat or sit around visiting Jim pretty much kept us in stitches. He always had a story to share. For instance the time that he and Phil were getting off the turnpike in his brand new Cadillac. Neither of them had change for the toll. They had to ask another driver for the 15 cents, after she had already given them four quarters. When he told the story he had us rolling with laughter. When Jim was in a room, the room was bright and happy.

Jim was a giving and humble man. You could always depend on him to be there if he was needed.

FROM THE FAMILY
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