OBITUARY

Steve Bradley Royer

November 19, 1945January 29, 2021
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Steve was a graphics artist, art director and sales specialist working most notably for Westwood Design and Hughes Aircraft Company, California and Boeing Company and Eddie Bauer, Seattle, Washington.

Stephen (Steve) B. Royer, 75 years of age, resident of Kirkland, Washington, passed away on January 29, 2021 of complications from cancer. He was born in Santa Monica, California on November 19, 1945 to parents Virgil (Red) Royer and Carol Headlee. He attended Art Center College of Design from 1963 to 1966. He was married to Susan Stovall At Wee Kirk o’ the Heather Church in Los Angeles, California on October 3, 1970.

Among his many design projects was the creation of the logo for the Portland Transit Group. His love of playing guitar, collecting and showing British motorcycles at various shows around the Seattle area were some of his many hobbies that brought him joy.

He is survived by his wife Susan; son and daughter-in-law Chris and Blie Lena; and his two grandchildren Cruz and Bliss.

Funeral service will be held at 11:00 AM, Friday, February 12, 2021 at Acacia Funeral Home and Memorial Park.

In lieu of flowers, the family is requesting that donations be made to the American Cancer Society or to St. Jude’s Cancer Research.

For a longer version of his life story, please scroll to the bottom of this obituary page. Thank you.

Services

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Memories

Steve Bradley Royer

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Bruce Juntti

February 12, 2021

A couple of memories of mine of Steve was when my wife, Forest, and I met Steve and Susan at Mount Rainier and they were camped out at Cougar Rock campground. I was an assistant scout master and one of the things I liked doing was dutch oven cooking, so I thought it would be cool to do a peach cobbler dessert there. Steve and Susan brought the canned peaches and we had PLENTY of peaches since I told Steve to get a "Costco-sized" can. Little did I realize the true size of a can of Costco peaches. Dessert turned out great (lots of peaches in the cobbler)! Another memory I have of Steve was his attention to detail when he was into H-O gauge (as I remember) model railroading. He would buy basically unpainted engines and train cars and detail them - they were amazing when he was done!

Christopher Couveau

February 11, 2021

Steve and I have shared the love of motorcycles dating back to the sixties. He had a 500 Triumph and I had an rd 400 Yamaha. We used to investigate the back roads in the San Fernando valley and surrounding hills before it was so built up. We continued that shared interest even when he relocated to Seattle and I stayed in Los Angeles. Every year the VME--a group of vintage motorcycle lovers would have the Isle of Vashon event where you would board a ferry from downtown Seattle and ride over to Vashon island. The whole event was to loosely mimic the famous Isle of Mann race where famous motorcycle riders would circulate the island a breakneck speeds. There was no racing at Vashon but more of a leisurely tour around the island which was also a poker run. It was always an invigorating event from the ferry ride often through the fog with hundreds of motorcycles on board, to the scenic ride around the island. One of the last events we attended was somewhat marred by a rather large arrogant member who insisted we pay for the poker run even though we were not participating in it. My instinct was to get away from him, but Steve showed a side to himself I had never seen. He was in this guys face asking his name and affiliation to report him to the VME association. He explained that he only gets to see his best friend once a year and this person had attempted to ruin the visit. Both Steve and I are quiet reserved people who do not engage in confrontation. But that day he was not about to have some bully try to push us around. If I had not realized before how important our visits were, I certainly did after that day and every day after.

Christopher Couveau

February 9, 2021

Steve and I decided to go up to the land of " flowers in your hair" sometime in the middle sixties . What was fairly unique about this trip is that it was accomplished in a red Austin Healy sprite with two guitars and a few overnight bags. Mind you, this car has barely enough room for its passengers, let alone anything else. We ended up sleeping in the car at the side of the road a few nights accompanied by the sound of ten wheelers thundering by and rocking the diminutive little car each time. We got out a few times to play in sing beside the pacific ocean on route 1. We visited a few coffee houses when we got to haight ashbury and the first one we came to said on its billboard that Chris and Steve were playing that night. That kind of made our trip in that our names were on display, obviously they must have been imposters since the real Chris and Steve had just arrived.

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Biography

Steve Royer


Personality: While he was a quiet and thoughtful man, he enjoyed interacting with different people that he would meet in his various work roles or in on-line sales of some of his hobby -oriented stock and clothing. His talents were in art, design and “word-smithing” and humor. His love of folk and ethnic music and guitar-playing added much joy to his life. His music choices were usually from the US, Canada and the British Isles and different eras. People enjoyed talking with him and his was knowledgeable on a range of subjects from music, British motorcycles, sports cars and gems and mineral collecting.
People enjoyed talking with him as he was knowledgeable on a range of subjects from music, British motorcycles, sports cars, antique marbles, and gem and mineral collecting.

Background: Steve was born in Santa Monica California and raised in the San Fernando Valley in northern Los Angeles County. His parents were Virgil and Carol Royer (nee Headlee) and he had one brother Donald.

As a child, Steve was a Cub Scout and enjoyed building himself a go-cart. He like going on hikes in the desert and in Yosemite National Park with his father where they would search for gems and minerals (not in the National Park!). He loved to draw, mostly cars. At Birmingham High School, he participated in gymnastics and for a short time in football. In his design class, he won an award for designing a brochure for a special show put on by the community of Encino for which he was featured in an article in the local newspaper. He graduated high school in 1963. His design instructor Barbara Brooks was the inspiration for him to continue to pursue graphic design as a career. He completed nearly four years studying various aspects of graphic design at the Design Center College in Los Angeles, California which would have earned him a degree. Unfortunately, the military was preparing to call him up, so he enlisted instead, hoping to obtain for a better role with the Army by doing so. He served three years’ active duty as an Army Medic SP4. Of that time, he served one year in the Viet Nam War. His last year was spent as a Medic stationed at the Yakima Firing Center, attached to Madigan Hospital at JBLM. He earned several patches and bars for his service. Most notable: at the request of his commanding officer, he designed a patch for his 50th Unit which was adopted and incorporated as one of their patch awards for the company.

Steve had several friends growing up – Norland Hoffer was one who was always thinking of ways for the two of them to try out new ideas. He was the motivator for Steve to start building a go-cart. For extra money, Steve mowed lawns and cared for yards of neighbors.
Later, as an adult, his best friends was Chris Couveau, who, with Steve, learned and played their guitars at various coffee houses in Southern California back in the 60’s. They bought sports cars at the same time. Steve’s first sports car was a Bug-Eye Sprite.

Steve married Susan Stovall in October 1970 and stayed married to her until his death. They were married at We Kirk o’ the Heather church at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Los Angeles, This church was the same one that Susan’s parents, aunt and uncle were married in during the first six months of 1937.
Steve and Susan had one child – Christopher Scot Royer – and with his wife Blie Royer, had two children of their own, Cruz a son, and a daughter Bliss.
As an adult Steve had been a member of the Muzzleloaders Club and VME (Vintage Motorcycle Enthusiasts) Club. He has actively built and sold model train cars and equipment, antique marbles and gems and minerals at various shows in the Northwest. He entered his 1972 Triumph Daytona motorcycle in Western Washington All British Field Meet for sports cars and motorcycles’ show three years in a row, winning 1st, 2nd and 3rd place awards.
He has financially supported organizations for Upper Midwest Native American tribes’ needs, as well as local food banks, St. Jude’s, Red Cross and Union Gospel Mission.

His favorite places to go for outdoor vacations, were Cannon Beach and Bend, Oregon as well as Cougar Rock Campground, Rainier National Park and various places in the San Juan Islands, Maui, Hawaii and locales in California.

Our three cats were the pets that Steve felt closest to but he got a big enjoyment out of our pet rabbit too.

Death: Steve passed away at home in Kirkland, Washington from complications from a challenging two-year battle with cancer. He is survived by his wife Susan, son Chris and daughter-in-law Blie Lena and two grandchildren. Service and inurnment to take place at Acacia Memorial Park and Cemetery.