OBITUARY

Harriett A. Bradley

August 29, 1925March 30, 2019
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Harriett Andrews Bradley, 93, passed away on March 30, 2019. Harriett was born in Atlanta to Harry B. Andrews and Bayma Gaddy Andrews. She was preceded in death by her parents, her husband Charlie Bradley, and an infant daughter Priscilla Ann Bradley. Survivors include sons Ben Bradley, and wife Maridon of Kennesaw, GA; Andy Bradley, and wife Kimberly of Dacula , GA; Joe Bradley, and wife Terri of Monroe, GA; eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Visitation will be on Saturday, April 6, from noon until 2:00pm at Eternal Hills Funeral Home, 3594 Stone Mountain Hwy, Snellville, GA. Funeral service will follow at 2:00pm in the Eternal Hills Funeral Home chapel. Harriett’s nephew, Stanley Pittman, will officiate. Burial will follow at Eternal Hills Memory Gardens. The family wishes to express their appreciation to Regency Hospice, particularly Julie, Natalie and Lin, for their kindness and caring for Harriett in her final days.

Services

  • Visitation Saturday, April 6, 2019
  • Funeral Service Saturday, April 6, 2019
REMEMBERING

Harriett A. Bradley

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Steve McKeel

April 5, 2019

I never knew Harriett, but I know her son Joe. She must have been a wonderful person. Pam and I pray God will comfort you in this time.

Matthew Bradley

April 3, 2019

Matthew Bradley

April 3, 2019

Charlie Bradley

April 3, 2019

Charlie Bradley

April 3, 2019

Matthew Bradley

April 2, 2019

Matthew Bradley

April 2, 2019

Matthew Bradley

April 2, 2019

FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY

Biography

Mom was born and raised in the Ormewood Park neighborhood of Atlanta. She was the youngest, by several years, of three girls. Her oldest sister was 12 years older than she, and they were very close all of their lives, always living no more than a few miles from each other. She grew up during the Depression, so times were tight. Like a lot of men during that time, her dad was in and out of work. She always said that they must have been poor, because most everyone was, but she didn’t know that they were, because her mother always had food on the table. She went to Girls High School and rode the streetcar there and back every day. She was raised in Omrewood Park Presbyterian Church, being active in the youth group there, playing the piano at their gatherings.

She married our dad in 1952, the wedding being held at the church she grew up in. Being the “baby” of her family, she had not learned to cook before she got married, and so Daddy was her “Guinea Pig”. She once tried to cook beans in a pressure cooker, and the valve blew out, sending beans all over the ceiling. Another time, she tried her hand at gravy. During the process, the gravy became too thick, so she called her mother for help. She was advised to add water, which then made it too thin. She called her mother again, and this time was advised to add corn starch, which resulted in it being too thick again. This process went back and forth several times, until in the end she said she “had enough gravy to feed an army”. And then once she was going to be a loving wife and make my dad a cake. He said that when he walked in from work, the side he saw was beautiful. But when he looked at the backside, it looked like a ski slope. He made the BIG mistake of laughing at it, and she ran out of the room in tears, promising to “never make him a cake again!”, and she said that she didn’t for a long time.

As they began to try and start a family, they had difficulty. Their first child, a girl, was born with a severe birth defect, and lived only a few minutes. As was the practice then, she did not get to hold, or even see, her baby. She carried the hurt from this throughout her life. Over the next few years, several other pregnancies ended in miscarriage. Finally, in 1957, she had her first son, Ben, although this birth was not easy either, and she and Ben nearly didn’t make it. After this, she had two other sons without any incident, Andy in 1959 and Joe in 1964.

Having not had any brothers as a model, raising three active boys was quite the new experience for her! We grew up in a nurturing, loving and caring home. Mom was easy-going, but firm and consistent in her discipline. She meant business, and kept a “switch” on top of the refrigerator, which she was not afraid to use when the situation called for it. She never used harsh words during these times, though, although I’m sure that we pushed her to the edge. We all have fond memories of family beach vacations every year (although, we don’t know how they were able to afford these), camping trips, and magical Christmases.

Mom and dad were married nearly 41 years before he died in 1993. In the years that followed, she volunteered at Emory Eastside hospital in Snellville, ultimately being recognized for more than 2,500 volunteer hours. She also took up line dancing.

She lived alone, and took care of herself for the next 19 years. When she was diagnosed with Vascular Dementia in 2012, she went to live with Ben and his family, where she was until her passing. Ben’s wife, Maridon, became the daughter she didn’t have, lovingly caring for her every need.

Mom had eight grandchildren, who she loved dearly, and who loved their “Nanny”. She had three great-grandchildren, but unfortunately, because of the dementia, she couldn’t really know them. One of them, however, Benji, also lives with Ben and Maridon, and she enjoyed watching him play, as it reminded her of her boys. When she couldn’t remember much of anything else, she remembered raising her boys. Every night as Maridon was getting her ready for bed, she would tell the story, “You know, I had three boys. I didn’t have any brothers, so it was new to me. My friends used to tease me about how I managed them, and I would say, ‘I keep a switch on top of the refrigerator, and they know that I will use it’”.

We are grateful that we were raised by a godly, loving and wise mom (and dad), and we know that is a gift that not everyone shares. We know, without a doubt, that she is in heaven now, and reunited with our dad, her parents, her sisters, and her baby girl, Priscilla Ann.