OBITUARY

Bud Burkhart

April 23, 1922March 11, 2014

91, a retired Denver Police officer who passed away peacefully on March 11, 2014 in Littleton, Colorado. Born April 23, 1922 in Denver, Colorado to Francis & Sophia Burkhart. He is survived by his loving family; daughters, Cindy (Dennis) Gordon, and Pamela (Scott) Gulley, grandchildren; Becky (Tom) Cole, Bud (Kristi) Bullard, McKinzie (Dave) Russell, and J.R. Gordon, Jr., great grandchildren; Stefany Bullard, Taylor Cole, Ryan Bullard, Torrie Cole, Kellan Russell, and one great great grandchild; Garrett Duvall. Bud was preceded in death by his loving wife, Gladys "Glady" E. Burkhart who passed away on March 7, 2013, and his parents Francis and Sophia.

A Celebration of Bud's Life will be held Saturday, March 15, 2014, 10:00am in the Chapel of Peace located at Olinger Crown Hill Mortuary. Interment will follow at Olinger Crown Hill Cemetery.

Services

  • Funeral Service Saturday, March 15, 2014
REMEMBERING

Bud Burkhart

have a memory or condolence to add?

ADD A MEMORY

receive updates when new memories are posted

RECEIVE UPDATES

March 16, 2014

Uncle Bud was such a nice person. He taught us both how to water ski and was so patient with us, especially me. We all went to Lake Powell in the 80's and had a great time. If you took off your shoes, they would go missing. Uncle Bud would put them away. He was such a neat person and that was the cleanest ship ever. I'm glad he is now with Auntie Glady . Ron & Skip Ancker

Becky Cole

March 15, 2014

I am unable to be there with my family today because I'm struggling with two losses - one of a well-lived, long life, only being called to Heaven because he couldn't bear living without his sweetie any longer, and another beautifully lived life that was cut way too short by a horrible disease that she didn't deserve, but fought bravely through it until her body could do no more. I lost my sister in-law Nancy exactly one hour before I lost my grandfather this week. Both were shining examples of how to live your life as an example to people through your actions and not just words. In grandpa's case, very few words, because we all know the poor guy could never get a word in edgewise when grandma was around!!

Bud and I spent a lot of summers with him and grandma. As I've gotten older, and reflected back on our time with them, they were such a wonderful example of "Love Thy Neighbor". Grandpa used to mow lawns during the summer, and a lot of his customers were widowed women, usually older than he and grandma. They didn't just care for their lawns, though, they cared for them, catering to whatever need they had. I remember Mrs. Huff, she didn't have any local family to visit her, and as she grew older she ended up in an assisted living highrise, which of course didn't require any lawn work. Grandpa and grandma still visited her frequently, bringing us along during the summers. Grandma was the social support, grandpa would fix whatever needed fixing, or move whatever needed moving, or bring up whatever groceries she had requested. She was not the only customer/friend they helped in this way. They also spent many years caring for their parents as they aged and needed help. In addition to teaching us to help those around us who need it, without expecting reward in any way, they also taught us to take care of our things. Grandpas cars were so well taken care of, he could drive them for 20 years, take them back to the dealer to trade them in, and the salesperson would be amazed that the car still looked brand new!

Grandpa was a quiet, humble man, but full of character and integrity. He served proudly in the Navy as a young man, and as a police officer for 25 years when he returned. I remember him getting ready for work, putting on his uniform, strapping on his gun, and getting that hat on just perfectly so. After he retired, we spent a lot of time in the summers waterskiing, and he would spend hours out there on the lake, quietly pulling in the rope, and throwing it back out again, and giving us tips while we drank gallons of lake water learning how to ski. He and grandma were in such great shape they were still skiing in their 70's!

Going through pictures last year for grandma's funeral, it really struck me how wonderful grandpa's smile was - it lit up his face, and his eyes laughed. I loved it when he would find something funny, and do this quiet chuckle, and give you this look like he knew a secret that he wasn't going to tell. I'm sure grandma was waiting for him, and I'm sure he gave her that wonderful smile of his as he crossed over into heaven, into the waiting arms of "his sweetie" and other family and friends he's lost along the way.

Love,

Becky Cole

March 15, 2014

I am unable to be there with my family today because I'm struggling with two losses - one of a well-lived, long life, only being called to Heaven because he couldn't bear living without his sweetie any longer, and another beautifully lived life that was cut way too short by a horrible disease that she didn't deserve, but fought bravely through it until her body could do no more. I lost my sister in-law Nancy exactly one hour before I lost my grandfather this week. Both were shining examples of how to live your life as an example to people through your actions and not just words. In grandpa's case, very few words, because we all know the poor guy could never get a word in edgewise when grandma was around!!

Bud and I spent a lot of summers with him and grandma. As I've gotten older, and reflected back on our time with them, they were such a wonderful example of "Love Thy Neighbor". Grandpa used to mow lawns during the summer, and a lot of his customers were widowed women, usually older than he and grandma. They didn't just care for their lawns, though, they cared for them, catering to whatever need they had. I remember Mrs. Huff, she didn't have any local family to visit her, and as she grew older she ended up in an assisted living highrise, which of course didn't require any lawn work. Grandpa and grandma still visited her frequently, bringing us along during the summers. Grandma was the social support, grandpa would fix whatever needed fixing, or move whatever needed moving, or bring up whatever groceries she had requested. She was not the only customer/friend they helped in this way. They also spent many years caring for their parents as they aged and needed help. In addition to teaching us to help those around us who need it, without expecting reward in any way, they also taught us to take care of our things. Grandpas cars were so well taken care of, he could drive them for 20 years, take them back to the dealer to trade them in, and the salesperson would be amazed that the car still looked brand new!

Grandpa was a quiet, humble man, but full of character and integrity. He served proudly in the Navy as a young man, and as a police officer for 25 years when he returned. I remember him getting ready for work, putting on his uniform, strapping on his gun, and getting that hat on just perfectly so. After he retired, we spent a lot of time in the summers waterskiing, and he would spend hours out there on the lake, quietly pulling in the rope, and throwing it back out again, and giving us tips while we drank gallons of lake water learning how to ski. He and grandma were in such great shape they were still skiing in their 70's!

Going through pictures last year for grandma's funeral, it really struck me how wonderful grandpa's smile was - it lit up his face, and his eyes laughed. I loved it when he would find something funny, and do this quiet chuckle, and give you this look like he knew a secret that he wasn't going to tell. I'm sure grandma was waiting for him, and I'm sure he gave her that wonderful smile of his as he crossed over into heaven, into the waiting arms of "his sweetie" and other family and friends he's lost along the way.
Love,
Becky

Michael Halingstad

March 14, 2014

You could always count on him to greet you with a smile. He will be missed, but he won't be forgotten.

My thoughts and prayers are with his family at this time.

Bud Bullard

March 14, 2014

I have always been proud to say that I was named after my Grandpa Bud. Being a highly decorated WWII Veteran and a retired DPD police officer I respected him a great deal. But it was more the strong and quiet man that taught me many life lessons about how to work hard, treat others with respect, and take care and protect others that may not be as fortunate. He and grandma always talked about the gift and value of family and friends, and to surround oneself with good people that possess big hearts. He also showed me that the best thing a man can do for his children is to love their mother. For over 70 years of marriage that's exactly what he did with grandma. You can't think of one without the other, and now they are back together again. They are inseparable…

A good part of my upbringing was done by my grandparents, so losing them both in the last year has been quite difficult. But I am truly blessed to have had two such loving and inspirational people in my life. They will be greatly missed, but never forgotten.

-Buddy

Larry & Sharon Ray

March 13, 2014

No bond is as great as that between a parent and child. My deepest condolences are with you as you grieve.

Jean Brienza

March 13, 2014

You were the one who kept me in shape all those years. God bless you Bud. You were a great friend.

George and Jean Brienza

Kathy Lowell Whiting

March 13, 2014

Uncle Bud was the sweetest man. Always a smile for you. I am so grateful for him.

Steve & Mel Duffy

March 13, 2014

You and your family are in our thoughts and prayers

Cathy Everitt

March 13, 2014

We were so blessed to provide care for Bud. We know that he is now with his "love". Thank you for allowing us into your family.

The staff of Above and Beyond Premier Home Care Services.

Cathy Everitt & Jim Schorer