OBITUARY

Larry Warren Isbell

December 12, 1938May 13, 2019
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Larry Warren Isbell, age 80, of Henderson, Colorado passed away on Monday, May 13, 2019.

Larry was born December 12, 1938 in Denver Colorado.

He was an avid hunter, fisherman and outdoorsman who was at his happiest out in nature with his loved ones.

He professional life consisted of very few positions because of his work ethic and loyalty. He retired from the City of Northglenn after 20 years of service.

He was adored by the family that he loved, supported, and gave everything he had to the very end. He is survived by his wife of nearly 61 years, Donna Marie Isbell.

His surviving children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren who were the absolute light of his life.

Daughters: Wendy Dickey (Robert) Kandy Wagner (Paul)

Son: Larry Isbell (RuthAnne)

Grandchildren: Devin Brown 31 Colton Wagner 29 Elizabeth Isbell 25 Joey Isbell 24 Alyssa Wagner 24 Rachael Isbell 16

Great-grandchildren: Danny Makhi Brown 8 Owen James Purcell 2

Surviving siblings: Maryellen Hoffman Butch Isbell (Julie)

Preceded in death by both his parents, his beloved son Lisle Wayne Isbell, his grandson Lisle Warren Isbell, two sisters, five brothers, and many friends.

Please send condolences to the family via Facebook or other social method.

Please send any contributions in his name to Backcountry Hunters and Anglers to help keep the public lands that he loved so much so public hands so the next generation can enjoy them as much as he did. https://www.backcountryhunters.org/

Visitation at Olinger Crown Hill Mortuary in Wheat Ridge, Colorado 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm on Thursday May 16, 2019

Funeral Service at Olinger Crown Hill Pavilion of Reflection 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

  • PALLBEARERS

  • Larry Isbell
  • Joe Isbell
  • Paul Wagner
  • Colton Wagner
  • Devin Brown
  • Ryan Keltch

Services

  • Visitation Thursday, May 16, 2019
  • Funeral Service Friday, May 17, 2019
  • Committal Service Friday, May 17, 2019

Memories

Larry Warren Isbell

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Larry Isbell

May 15, 2019

A look of pure admiration for his young family

Larry Isbell

May 15, 2019

Larry Isbell

May 15, 2019

Picture of the needlepoint done just after they were married in 1958

Alyssa Wagner

May 15, 2019

Alyssa Wagner

May 15, 2019

Alyssa Wagner

May 15, 2019

Alyssa Wagner

May 15, 2019

Alyssa Wagner

May 15, 2019

Alyssa Wagner

May 15, 2019

Alyssa Wagner

May 15, 2019

FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY
FROM THE FAMILY

Biography

Hello everyone. Thank you all for coming today to support our family and pay your respects to a great man.
It has been a rough week for us all as I’m sure you can imagine
It has been a week of memories of Pops flooding back. Memories that, in time, I know will make me smile but right now they cause heartache. The heartache comes because I know that we have reached the time when, despite the best efforts of his doctors and all the love in the world from his family, we can’t make any new ones.
We now must treasure all the time and memories we had.
For example, I was sitting with my wife talking about Pops the other night and as I looked up at the almost full moon, I was transported back to my childhood by one sure treasured memory. I was taken back to one of the nights that Pops and I spent in the front yard of the house I grew up in, on 78th Ave. Pops and I would sit in the yard and use a telescope that they had gotten me to look up at the heavens.
It was not the greatest telescope in the world and there was a good amount of light pollution blocking our view even back then. Despite that we looked out at the stars and the planets in wonder and awe. We were looking out into space in a way that was a new adventure for us both.
What we could always see the clearest was the moon. All the craters and surface detail were ours for the viewing. We sat for hours and talked about all the things we could see and all the things we could not.
Little things like that, a memory I hadn’t accessed in many years, really help to define Pops for me. A simple activity shared with family. That is what made him happy. Family.
All the time he spent in the mountains chasing all manner of game animal; what he really cherished about that time was the time spent with us. The time with his brothers. The time with his closest friends. The time with Joey and me. That is what mattered.
He connected to each of us in his own way.
He was not a man of many words in most cases, but he had a razor-sharp wit and he absolute delighted in playfully pushing our buttons. I will never forget that wicked little grin when he knew he had gotten under your skin just a little. We all loved it. Even if you were the butt of the playful joke that day. That playful nature is a trait that everyone of us kids gathered up huge helpings of when we developed our own personalities.
Pops made a huge impact on so many people. He made an impact by example; By going about his business and taking care of his family each and every day. So much so that each of us kids had friends that adopted him as “dad”, “daddy” or “pops”. And he adopted them in return. He knew that sometimes everyone needs a strong and safe place to call home and be safe.
I love you, Pops. I miss you.
You did things your way at every opportunity in your life and you stuck to what you held as your moral code.
You showed me everyday what it means to be a man and if I wind up being half the man you were, I will count myself lucky.
You have left shoes so enormous that I don’t have much chance in filling them, but I will spend the rest of my life trying to live up to your example. I will approach decisions and situations asking myself ‘what would Pops do?’ That has been a guiding light of my life for as long as I remember and that will only be more prevalent philosophy now.

Thank you for everything.
I would not be the man I am today without you.
Rest now and enjoy the love and attention of those who left this world before you. Your parents. Your brothers and friends. Your son and grandson.
Don’t worry about us. We will take it from here.